SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Ships From Literature

1541 views
46 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Ships From Literature
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, December 5, 2019 7:36 AM

Here's a good one.

   This is going to be short and sweet. How many Surface ships are described in Literature Besides the Jules Verne Nautilus and the Titanic??

 Now I know the Nautilus from Verne is NOT a surface ship. There have been many iterations of her besides just the Harper Goff/Disney version . She definitely did not look as Verne described her.

    How many surface ships can you think of besides, say the H.M.S. Surprise from Patrick O'Brian's novels? How many of them were sailing Ships and how many were Steamships?

  • Member since
    December 2019
Posted by Ambrose on Thursday, December 5, 2019 8:30 AM

Hey...I'm new to the forum as a participant, but I've been following the message threads for quite awhile now, having especially enjoyed many of the build suggestions, build logs, and historic references.

This thread really caught my attention as it helped me to remember the first seafaring novel I remember reading.....Douglas Reeman's HMS Saracen.

HMS Saracen as I remember was a very well written story about a monitor..... one of those Royal Navy shore bombardment beasts that appeared in WWI, then became a backwater staple in the second war. I think the book is out of print now, but may be available in the secondary market.

Incidentally, Reeman is best know for his Bolitho series novels, published under the name Alexander Kent.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, December 5, 2019 8:55 AM

Lots and lots from C S Forester's novels, especially the Hornblower novels.  And the Bounty, of course.  Also, the ones from Winds of War and its sequel (forget the author).  Forget the name of the ship in Caine Mutiny.  How about the ship featured in the Odessy?  There was a fictional book about a German commerce raider, but forget the name of the book and the name of the ship.  Are we talking only fiction novels or do you include non-fiction as literature too?

Oh, there was the book by London, featuring a sail vessel, again forget the name of the novel and the name of the ship.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, December 5, 2019 9:29 AM

The Winds books and The Caine Mutiny were written by Herman Wouk.

U.S.S. Caine.

Thousands. I think Song of Fire and Ice series has several dozens.

Pequod from Moby Richard.

The Ark.

HMS Compass Rose.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Thursday, December 5, 2019 9:42 AM

Melville, HG Wells, Robert Louis Stevenson

  • Member since
    July 2008
  • From: Co.Kerry, Ireland.
Posted by Est.1961 on Thursday, December 5, 2019 12:34 PM

Jason's Argo. 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, December 5, 2019 2:34 PM

C.S. Lewis- 'Voyage of the Dawn Treader' You have the version in the novel and the live-action movie. 

The 'Emma' and 'Alert' from H.P. Lovecraft's 'The Call of Cthulhu' You could do a pretty awesome diorama of the 'Alert' ramming Cthulhu in the face! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    December 2006
  • From: Jerome, Idaho, U.S.A.
Posted by crackers on Thursday, December 5, 2019 5:34 PM

In the New Testiment, Acts of the Apostles, around the year 60, Saint Paul was under arrest to be taken to Rome to be tried as a political rebel.The Roman grain ship named CASTOR and POLLUX that transported Saint Paul, was wrecked on the Island of Malta, even though four anchors were cast out to restrain the doomed ship. Fortunately, all passengers including Paul swam to safty. Upon reaching shore, they made a fire to dry themselves. CASTOR and POLLUX, named after the heavenly twins in Roman and Greek mythology is the first known ship to have a name.

Happy modeling   Crackers  Big Smile

Anthony V. Santos

  • Member since
    December 2018
Posted by Ted4321 on Thursday, December 5, 2019 5:58 PM

Joshua Slocum's Sailing Alone Around the World.  His journey was in a sloop named Spray. 

HMS Beagle from The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin.  

And of course The Millennium Falcon from Star Wars... maybe that ship belongs in a different thread.  Stick out tongue

T e d

 

  • Member since
    October 2005
Posted by CG Bob on Thursday, December 5, 2019 9:51 PM

USCGC PANACHE, a 280' medium endurance cutter, was described by Tom Clancy in "Clear and Present Danger".  The PANACHE was loosley based on the 270' Famaous or BEAR class of cutters.  

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Thursday, December 5, 2019 10:40 PM

Speaking of Tom Clancy, USS Reuben James (FFG-57) appears in print in "Hunt for Red October" and "Red Storm Rising". I actually saw Reuben James berthed in Sydney Harbour beside some of our own (now decommissioned) FFG's about 15 years ago.

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Friday, December 6, 2019 12:47 AM

Speraking of which .  .  . Thought I'd share this as I was there for part of the filming.

And of course .  .  . these go too.

Hey, you got to take advantage of the opportunities, Right!!

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, December 6, 2019 11:25 AM

Hi Don;

 There was a story-I don't remember the author-About Ocean Going Steam Tugs as escorts in W.W.2. The main protagonist was a double stacked tug called the "Isabelle Quell".

   Now that said, It was a very fascinating story about small ships and strong men against the sea. 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Friday, December 6, 2019 1:36 PM

The Destroyermen fantasy sci fi series by Taylor Anderson. 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, December 6, 2019 1:50 PM

Tanker - Builder

Hi Don;

 There was a story-I don't remember the author-About Ocean Going Steam Tugs as escorts in W.W.2. The main protagonist was a double stacked tug called the "Isabelle Quell".

   Now that said, It was a very fascinating story about small ships and strong men against the sea. 

 

You may be thinking of the Farley Mowat book "The Grey Seas Under". The ship was the Foundation Franklin, originally Aberdeen built tug named HMS Frisky that was rescued from a ship breaker in Germany between the Wars.

I think her bell is in a museum in Nova Scotia. That is a really good book, and she's a popular RC subject.

 

 

  • Member since
    December 2012
Posted by rwiederrich on Friday, December 6, 2019 3:53 PM

Poseiden Adventure.......

  • Member since
    December 2012
Posted by rwiederrich on Friday, December 6, 2019 3:58 PM

The Last voyage....SS Claridon

  • Member since
    December 2012
Posted by rwiederrich on Friday, December 6, 2019 4:07 PM

Reap the Wild Wind.....Jubilee

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Friday, December 6, 2019 7:55 PM

Many years back, my brother assembled some clipper ship model, Cutty Sark I believe. Anyway, the cat decided that it did not need to share the shelf with the ship so cat VS ship equals one very trashed ship model. After the rebuttal by my brother at the cats expense, a diorama ensued entitled "Wreck of the Hesparus" (with apologies to H. W. Longfellow). 

  • Member since
    October 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by sharkbait on Saturday, December 7, 2019 12:25 PM

You have never been lost until you've been lost at Mach 3!

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Saturday, December 7, 2019 3:22 PM

Now See, Sharkbait;

 That one is excellent for a Tramp Steamer!

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Saturday, December 7, 2019 3:24 PM

Hi " G "

    Yes, that was an excellent book! That's what I am talking about .

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by Surface_Line on Saturday, December 7, 2019 5:23 PM

Funny you should mention ships from (not Great American Classic) literature.
I'm working now on a NUMA ship from Clive Cussler's novels.  May even add my first-ever 1/700 figure, seeing as how Dirk Pitt must be aboard.  I don't know which ship it will be yet, but it will have a helo deck and a few submersibles on the after deck by some big cranes.  The superstructure will probably have square windows instead of portholes.  And it will certainly be turquoise.

Also, I became interested in wartime tug operations many years ago while reading Jan de Hartog's "The Captain", about Dutch tugs in service on the English Channel.  I don't remember the names of the tugs; will have to read it again, I guess.

And with G's mention above of Farley Mowat's "Grey Seas Under", I am reminded of another of his books - "The Serpent's Coil", seeing Foundation Josephine and Foundation Lilian as the tugs in the rescue/salvage of a worn out Liberty Ship named Leicester.

  • Member since
    December 2006
  • From: Jerome, Idaho, U.S.A.
Posted by crackers on Saturday, December 7, 2019 6:53 PM

The American whaler ESSEX

The American whaler ESSEX, was launched at Nantucket, Massachusetts in 1799. While on a whaling voyage in the South Pacific. she was rammed and sunk by a sperm whale on November 20, 1820. Twenty members of her crew made for South America in whale boats over a thousand miles. Suffering dehydration, starvation and exposure, they were forced to eat those who had died. Only eight survived the ordeal. This story became the basis of Herman Melville's novel, Moby ***

Happy modeling     Big Smile

 

Anthony V. Santos

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by PFJN on Saturday, December 7, 2019 7:24 PM

sharkbait

Hi,

Looking at a couple stills from the video that you posted the ship looks close enought to the old Lindberg Q Ship, that you may be able to use that model as a base for building this tramp steamer, if you wanted. Stick out tongue

SC1

SC2

SC3

Q Ship

1st Group Build

  • Member since
    March 2019
  • From: Post Falls, Idaho
Posted by Sigep Ziggy on Saturday, December 7, 2019 8:37 PM

Run Silent, Run Deep, by Capt Edward L. Beach Jr

USS Walrus, Japanese destroyer Akikaze

Harm's Way, by James E. Bassett Jr

USS Salt Lake City (CA-25)

At Dawn We Slept: The Untold Story Of Pearl Harbor (ToraT Tora! Tora!) by Gordon Prange

Japanese Fleet, US Fleet

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, December 7, 2019 9:55 PM

With hats off to our departed friend, Dr. Tilley was a great fan of the Glencannon series of books.

That ship was the Inchcliffe Castle, the Chief Engineer was Mr. Glencannon.

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Saturday, December 7, 2019 10:20 PM

You want to read a good book, try IN REPOSE, by Brian O'Connor. It's a non fiction piece about a U.S. Navy diver, working on the wreck of the USS ARIZONA in Pearl Harbor with the National Park Service. Comfortable read with lots of info about the ship and her demise, without being overly technical. Even has a glossary in the back for the non-nautical types. Check it out at http://www.bootinanniepublishing.com 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, December 7, 2019 10:24 PM

Know the author?

In that vein, the last survivor of the sinking of BB-39 who has chosen to be buried there was, today. I think only three others are still with us.

 

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Saturday, December 7, 2019 10:43 PM

Yes, and those three have all selected to be interred elsewhere (though that is subject to change). So, Lauren Bruner will probably be the last interred aboard ARIZONA.

Oh, and yes, I do know the author personally. Nice guy, real modest.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.