SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

F-4 Phantom Exhaust advice needed

855 views
14 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    January, 2015
F-4 Phantom Exhaust advice needed
Posted by TheMongoose on Tuesday, April 04, 2017 9:00 PM

I think i had a good concept here for adding burnt metal to the exhaust but as usual i was too ham fisted with the brush. Before i just jump in and try to cover it up could anyone offer some advice on how i might make this come out looking good? 

I used a flat, square edged brush about 1/4" wide. I tried to use a drybrush approach but got too much paint on the one side for sure, and maybe on the other side too. Those are Tamiya clear green and blue ove Vallejo flat aluminum.

should I  apply jet ehaust over it and count on that to cover it up? Possibly just paint over it with flat aluminum? Or something totally different? I'm hoping someone else has done something similar and can offer up a fix!

On the bench - 1/35 F-35A Lightning II, 1/72 Sptfire MkVb & for a change of pace a 1/700 USS New York

 

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by KnightTemplar5150 on Tuesday, April 04, 2017 11:08 PM

Tamiya transparent paints are a funny beast to work with, Mongoose. They can be a pain sometimes with a brush and the airbrush is really the tool for this stuff, but even that requires a bit of testing and playing around to get the most of the paint. If she were my bird, I'd just strip and repaint because metal finishes usually don't hold up well when I try to fix things and I make more problems. Looks like it's one part, so no major problems in starting fresh. The effects that I think you have in mind would be airbrushed with Alclad's line - they've got some great stuff to simulate the heat staining and color shifts. Best wishes to you, 'Goose!

  • Member since
    September, 2010
  • From: California
Posted by mikeymize on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 1:26 AM

  I agree with KnightTemplar on this one. I've had some bad experiences with both Tamiya clear colours as well as the "smoke" one. They're good products however they require a little tweaking at times. I would start fresh; strip off the old stuff and re spray a metalizer or whatever paint you like. I've had reasonable success with the Tamiya pigments or see what MiG has to offer. Best of luck with it!

 

"Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time".


  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • From: providence ,r.i.
Posted by templar1099 on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 4:32 AM

B1 Crew Chief posted a good technique in the aircraft section for his F4 build,might want to take a look.

"le plaisir delicieux et toujours nouveau d'une occupation inutile"

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 8:19 AM

I strongly suggest using an air brush for this. You will be able to get subtle fading that is extremely difficult to get without the use of one.

The F-4s area in question is a dark steel wich darkens from the exaust. I shot mine in black enamel first followed by Alclad steel then flat black subtle staining. Tamiya clear blue thinned 50/50 came last setting low psi to get very subtle bluish heat discoloration. Double click on the picture for a closeup.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 9:10 AM

Your brush was not dry enough.  I can get just as thin a coat of paint by dry brushing as I can with my airbrush.  The advantage of the dry brush method is that the paint goes on a bit unevenly, hitting mainly high spots, giving more texture and depth to the result.

Like airbrushing, or any painting technique, it takes practice.  Practice on scrap plastic, not good kit parts.  Keep reducing the amount of paint on the brush till you get the result you are looking for.  I dip the brush in the paint, then brush it out on the surface of a coated cardboard, or plastic sheet.  I then pick up paint from that paint on the "palette". It dries fast, so you have to keep redoing the paint on the palette, even with enamel.  I find enamel or oil far better for airbrushing, because acrylic dries so fast.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • From: providence ,r.i.
Posted by templar1099 on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 9:11 AM

plasticjunkie
The F-4s area in question is a dark steel wich darkens from the exaust.


Thanks for at least straightening me out PJ,being a grunt I wouldn't realize the difference. 

"le plaisir delicieux et toujours nouveau d'une occupation inutile"

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 9:21 AM

templar1099
 
plasticjunkie
The F-4s area in question is a dark steel wich darkens from the exaust.

 


Thanks for at least straightening me out PJ,being a grunt I wouldn't realize the difference. 

 

No worries Big Smile

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 9:26 AM

Another option to consider is Tamiya's Weathering Master set "D", which contains "burnt blue" and "burnt red" mediums (I'm not going to call them pigments because though similar in application, they aren't).

Watch the demo here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVjjvSaQeew  

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 9:41 AM

Phil_H

Another option to consider is Tamiya's Weathering Master set "D", which contains "burnt blue" and "burnt red" mediums (I'm not going to call them pigments because though similar in application, they aren't).

Watch the demo here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVjjvSaQeew  

 

That is another method that would look good. I do think that less is more and IMO he went heavy handed with the colors. Had to mute out that background music LOL.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 12:04 PM

I know a fellow hobbyist in another forum used a technique that's out of world using Alclad lacquers. All done using an airbrush....

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by TheMongoose on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 8:55 PM

Awesome response, thank you all! I will go with the concensus and start over.

Any additional advice for stripping the metal colors? I don't see anything obvious on the vallejo website. I'm going to watch the video and look at the airbrush technique referenced before decidng whether to stay with the drybrush approach. Don I'm glad to hear this has merit and is reasonable to try.

...edit...I'm with plasticjunkie, i watched that video just now and had to mute it within 15 seconds!

On the bench - 1/35 F-35A Lightning II, 1/72 Sptfire MkVb & for a change of pace a 1/700 USS New York

 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Thursday, April 06, 2017 2:13 PM

Muted it in 3 seconds. What a way to ruin a how-to video...

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by TheMongoose on Friday, April 07, 2017 10:25 PM

Found a new piece on ebay. It'll be here Monday. In the mean time i worked on this one for practice. I used jet exhaust to streak the tail and cover up alot of the clear green and blue just leaving the lines on the edges like i saw in the pictures. what do you think?

On the bench - 1/35 F-35A Lightning II, 1/72 Sptfire MkVb & for a change of pace a 1/700 USS New York

 

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by KnightTemplar5150 on Friday, April 07, 2017 11:49 PM

Yes 

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

SUBSCRIBER-ONLY CONTENT
FREE NEWSLETTER