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Questions about Bare Metal Foil

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  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Questions about Bare Metal Foil
Posted by MrStecks on Thursday, September 14, 2017 3:48 PM

Hey All, as I'm working along on the Eduard 1/32 P-47 Dottie Mae, I've been testing several NMF options, one of which is Bare Metal Foil.  The finish looks nice and it hasn't been too hard to work with in my testing.

But my question mainly is, can I spray acrylics on top of it, or should I lay down the acrylic first and put the foil on top of it?  

Thanks for any help.  Bare Metal Foil is completely new to me.

Cheers, Mark 


On the bench: Eduard 1/32 P-47 Dottie Mae

In the queue: Tamiya 1/32 P-51 Mustang;  WNW 1/32 Fokker D.VII (Fok.) "Early";  Revell 1/48 B-25J;  AMT 1/48 Lockheed Vega;  AMT 1/48 Stinson Reliant SR-9;  Revell 1/48 TBF Avenger;  Hasegawa 1/48 Nakajima E8N1 Type 95 Reconnaissance Seaplane (DAVE) Model 1

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Thursday, September 14, 2017 4:42 PM

MrStecks

Hey All, as I'm working along on the Eduard 1/32 P-47 Dottie Mae, I've been testing several NMF options, one of which is Bare Metal Foil.  The finish looks nice and it hasn't been too hard to work with in my testing.

But my question mainly is, can I spray acrylics on top of it, or should I lay down the acrylic first and put the foil on top of it?  

Thanks for any help.  Bare Metal Foil is completely new to me.

Cheers, Mark 

 

Bare Metal publishes a $2.50 booklet on how to use their products. Bare Metal came on the market in 1970 year after I'd quit the hobby, SNJ products marketed their airbrush spray Metalizers around then, met the proprietor one time later in the 1970s. I should give Bare Metal a try before I "finally" quit the hobby, probably something simple like an "off the assembly line" 1/72nd scale P-51.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Thursday, September 14, 2017 9:04 PM

Why not use Alclad or any metallic paint brand instead? The thing with using BMF is the task of burnishing it out without getting any wrinkles.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, September 15, 2017 8:45 AM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

Why not use Alclad or any metallic paint brand instead? The thing with using BMF is the task of burnishing it out without getting any wrinkles.

 

I agree.  I have given up on metal foil for large areas because of the wrinkle and bump problems.  I only use it for small areas and stripes.  I find Alclad great for large areas.  Secret is getting a flawless undercoat, and putting on Alclad in very thin coat, paint flow dialed way back.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by MrStecks on Friday, September 15, 2017 9:36 AM

Thanks for the info and links guys, I appreciate it.  I'm still just in the experimentation phase, so I'm looking at all options.  I really liked the AK Xtreme Metal paint I used on my last build, but that was my first NMF so I'm exploring other things this time around.  I'll be testing Alclad this weekend.

I got a sheet of Bare Metal Foil and have been tinkering with it on some scrap plastic.  I can see it's potential on small parts, but it does look like large areas would be tough to manage.  I'm also testing Molotow Liquid Chrome, which looks amazing... sometimes.  Problem is I can't get a consistent results with it yet, so testing continues.  When it lays down correctly though, it is stunning. 

Cheers, Mark


On the bench: Eduard 1/32 P-47 Dottie Mae

In the queue: Tamiya 1/32 P-51 Mustang;  WNW 1/32 Fokker D.VII (Fok.) "Early";  Revell 1/48 B-25J;  AMT 1/48 Lockheed Vega;  AMT 1/48 Stinson Reliant SR-9;  Revell 1/48 TBF Avenger;  Hasegawa 1/48 Nakajima E8N1 Type 95 Reconnaissance Seaplane (DAVE) Model 1

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Friday, September 15, 2017 2:22 PM

I know that a lot of modelers, if not most, use some type of paint to duplicate a NMF. I have seen some really great results; however, I have stopped using Alclad, and any other paint, when it comes to doing a NMF finish on airplanes. I only use Bare Metal Foil. This is just my opinion, only metal can look like metal.

I have been using BMF for years and have had no problem with wrinkles on large panels. The solution is simple, Cut the BMF a bit larger than the panel to be covered. Apply the BMF along one edge of the panel with your fingers. Then use a paper blending stick/stump to smooth out the BMF. It works like a charm. No wrinkles. Just keep in mind, this process takes  time and a lot of patience.  The paper blending stick/stump can be found in any craft store in the same department as colored pencils. I use two different colors of BMF, Matt Aluminum and Improved Chrome. After I apply each pnel I lightly rub the BMF with 0000 steel wool.

Following are some exampls of BMF:

I am currently working on the Revell 1/48 B-29 in BMF. It is taking a long time. Following are a few pictures of the WIP:

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Saturday, September 16, 2017 7:10 PM

Those kits look great... if you're looking for the new and restored look. In reality, most bare metal look aircrafts don't look like that during WW2 or while in active service. Yeah, they keep them clean and all but certainly not shiny. I don't care for the foil method because to me, it looks unrealistic. Each to his own.

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Saturday, September 16, 2017 10:07 PM

Monogram, B-29, though, not Revell.  Big Smile

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Saturday, September 16, 2017 11:02 PM

the Baron

Monogram, B-29, though, not Revell.  Big Smile

 

Yep, you are correct. Monogram, not Revell.Wink

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Sunday, September 17, 2017 4:27 PM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

Those kits look great... if you're looking for the new and restored look. In reality, most bare metal look aircrafts don't look like that during WW2 or while in active service. Yeah, they keep them clean and all but certainly not shiny. I don't care for the foil method because to me, it looks unrealistic. Each to his own. 

I agree, each to his own. I also think that not every model needs to look like a beat-up WWII airplane. In last month's edition of FineScale Model it was discussed that over weathering of  planes and tanks has gotten a bit out of hand.  The following are two of my models. The B-17 looks like a beat-up bomber and the B-24 was painted with Testors' Metalizer. I like the B-17 because it looks like it's been around the block a few times, but it doesn't look over weathered. I think that the B-24 looks okay, but it still looks like a painted model. I am considering buying another B-24 and using Bare Metal Foil on it because I do not like the painted look. Yes, you can call me obsessive. 

 

For some reason, a lot of modelers get really riled up when I post photos of my BMF airplanes. There was a guy on the ARC Air website that really reamed me out for using BMF. He told me that he hated my models and that I should stop modeling. Talk about nuts!

I just think that using products like Alclad or Testors' Metalizer paints do not make for a realistic NMF (my opinion). The following is a photo of two of my F-86 models. The one on the left is finished with Testors' Metalizer Aluminum and the one on the left is BMF. The one on the left does not look shiny, but it doesn't look like real aluminum. It just looks like a painted surface. The one on the right looks like a real metal surface because it is real metal.

Following are two photos that I found on the Internet of F-104 planes models (these are not my models). They were painted with a NMF paint.  Both are well done models, but neither model looks like a real NMF because they were painted. Plus, IMHO, the panel lines are over accentuated. Just my opinion.

It is not possible, IMHO, to duplicate the subtlties of real metal with paint. Following is a photo of a real F-104. Checkout the appearance of the metal. It is not possible to duplicate that with paint. 

 

Following is a close up of my F-104. Notice the subtle panel lines and the "grain' of the metal panels. I do not think that it is shiny at all. It just looks like a clean plane with a metal finish.

Just one my thing. My F-86 is very shiny because I tried to duplicate a restored F-86. The top photo is a photo of a restored F-86 and and the second photo is my model.

Now that a got that off my chest I feel better!!!!!

Back to my first statement, "I agree, each to his own."  If a modeler likes using Alclad or Testors' Metalize to duplicate a NMF finish, more power to him/her. If someone likes to use BMF, more power to him or her. All that really matters is that they enjoy themselves.

By the way BlackSheepTwoOneFour, can you post some photos of your NMF airplanes? I would like to see them, maybe I can learn something new.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Sunday, September 17, 2017 6:31 PM

Per their website, Bare Metal Foil has been on the market 47 years, do folks here still have models made with the stuff from decades ago? How's it holding up?

Given my age won't live long to see how any model I've made with the stuff has held up say 30 years from now, way short of that I'd love to see photos of old models from folks here how the self-adhensives have held up.

Also, and this is important, can Bare Metal Foil be masked for spray painting over?

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Sunday, September 17, 2017 8:17 PM

Retired In Kalifornia

Per their website, Bare Metal Foil has been on the market 47 years, do folks here still have models made with the stuff from decades ago? How's it holding up?

Given my age won't live long to see how any model I've made with the stuff has held up say 30 years from now, way short of that I'd love to see photos of old models from folks here how the self-adhensives have held up.

Also, and this is important, can Bare Metal Foil be masked for spray painting over?

 

That is a good question regarding the  lifespan of the adhesive I just asked the owner of the company that question. 

I have never had good luck masking BMF. The tape tends to pull up the foil.

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Sunday, September 17, 2017 9:19 PM

JohnnyK

 

 
Retired In Kalifornia

Per their website, Bare Metal Foil has been on the market 47 years, do folks here still have models made with the stuff from decades ago? How's it holding up?

Given my age won't live long to see how any model I've made with the stuff has held up say 30 years from now, way short of that I'd love to see photos of old models from folks here how the self-adhensives have held up.

Also, and this is important, can Bare Metal Foil be masked for spray painting over?

 

 

 

That is a good question regarding the  lifespan of the adhesive I just asked the owner of the company that question. 

 

I have never had good luck masking BMF. The tape tends to pull up the foil.

 

Glad y'all said that. I should therefore first try building something with as many flat sides as possible or one with continuous curves, maybe a Heller Dewoitine 510. Built one in late 1980s, fairly easy build.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Monday, September 18, 2017 9:54 AM

 Firstly  , Mark ;

 Wash your bare metal plane gently with Dawn Clear and warm water , Wipe dry with a soft cotton cloth . Burnish with that cloth giving a final shine .

 Now apply your Decals . Then Clearcoat it with a semi Gloss or Gloss-coat of MM Boyd's clear . ( it doesn't yellow  ). As far as durability  .The first plane I did was a Revell Airliner for a dio .That plane is now thirty years old .

 The foil ? It looks like I did it this week . Has any fallen off or curled at the edges ? No .

 Remember this though , You MUST burnish slowly and carefully . Do NOT hurry the job . I don't even have trouble with the metal panels blending properly at the wing roots . The fairing Can be done in one piece .

 The trick here is to carefully look at the foil , It does have a grain ! This is from the weighted forming rollers taking it to this thin state . Then install the fairing in a direction that lets the grain go from toward the nose to the tail .

 Burnish GENTLY with a soft cloth rolled into a Ball after you have it all down tight . Go over it with a rounded Amuminum Hamdle that is glass smooth Gently bringing a higher shine to it .Then burnish one more time with the cloth .

 If you are not using Tamiya or one of the painters tapes then run the tape through your fingers gently before applying it . Don't do this heavily . Just a nice gentle firm pull .The tape Will seal well and it won't pull the foil off if when you remove it , If you fold it back on itself and pull gently .

 Oh ! Before I finish , I found out about the extra shine from aluminum being used in burnishing . I was burnishing the ends of a model car bumper where the seams had been removed . I wanted this to be absolutely NOT Noticeable .

   After using the side of one end of a NEW X-Acto handle it shone way better than I expected and the foil was not even noticeable at the edges . Then I rounded a number one handle and polished it till it was glass smooth .This has worked as a finishing foil tool now for some years .

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Monday, September 18, 2017 10:52 AM

JohnnyK

 

 
Retired In Kalifornia

Per their website, Bare Metal Foil has been on the market 47 years, do folks here still have models made with the stuff from decades ago? How's it holding up?

Given my age won't live long to see how any model I've made with the stuff has held up say 30 years from now, way short of that I'd love to see photos of old models from folks here how the self-adhensives have held up.

Also, and this is important, can Bare Metal Foil be masked for spray painting over?

 

 

 

That is a good question regarding the  lifespan of the adhesive I just asked the owner of the company that question. 

 

I have never had good luck masking BMF. The tape tends to pull up the foil.

 

Surmised that, needed to ask first, hmm...

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Monday, September 18, 2017 10:55 AM

Tanker - Builder

 Firstly  , Mark ;

 Wash your bare metal plane gently with Dawn Clear and warm water , Wipe dry with a soft cotton cloth . Burnish with that cloth giving a final shine .

 Now apply your Decals . Then Clearcoat it with a semi Gloss or Gloss-coat of MM Boyd's clear . ( it doesn't yellow  ). As far as durability  .The first plane I did was a Revell Airliner for a dio .That plane is now thirty years old .

 The foil ? It looks like I did it this week . Has any fallen off or curled at the edges ? No .

 Remember this though , You MUST burnish slowly and carefully . Do NOT hurry the job . I don't even have trouble with the metal panels blending properly at the wing roots . The fairing Can be done in one piece .

 The trick here is to carefully look at the foil , It does have a grain ! This is from the weighted forming rollers taking it to this thin state . Then install the fairing in a direction that lets the grain go from toward the nose to the tail .

 Burnish GENTLY with a soft cloth rolled into a Ball after you have it all down tight . Go over it with a rounded Amuminum Hamdle that is glass smooth Gently bringing a higher shine to it .Then burnish one more time with the cloth .

 If you are not using Tamiya or one of the painters tapes then run the tape through your fingers gently before applying it . Don't do this heavily . Just a nice gentle firm pull .The tape Will seal well and it won't pull the foil off if when you remove it , If you fold it back on itself and pull gently .

 Oh ! Before I finish , I found out about the extra shine from aluminum being used in burnishing . I was burnishing the ends of a model car bumper where the seams had been removed . I wanted this to be absolutely NOT Noticeable .

   After using the side of one end of a NEW X-Acto handle it shone way better than I expected and the foil was not even noticeable at the edges . Then I rounded a number one handle and polished it till it was glass smooth .This has worked as a finishing foil tool now for some years .

 

Would like to see photo of it. Oldest surviving models I have were made in 1990, will photograph & post on this website hopefully before the year's out.

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, September 18, 2017 1:23 PM

Last night I e-mailed Randy Mason, the owner of Bare Metal Foil. I asked him  how long the adhesive is expected to last. He said that his father, the original owner of BMF, invented BMF about 40 years ago because he was looking for a more realistic way to obtain a natural metal finish on airplanes.  Remember back then there was no Alclad or Testors' Metalizer paint. Randy sent me the following photos of airplanes that his father made about 40 years ago. As you can see the BMF is still sticking to the models.

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by MrStecks on Monday, September 18, 2017 1:24 PM

JohnnyK

 

 
BlackSheepTwoOneFour

Those kits look great... if you're looking for the new and restored look. In reality, most bare metal look aircrafts don't look like that during WW2 or while in active service. Yeah, they keep them clean and all but certainly not shiny. I don't care for the foil method because to me, it looks unrealistic. Each to his own. 

 

 

I agree, each to his own. I also think that not every model needs to look like a beat-up WWII airplane. In last month's edition of FineScale Model it was discussed that over weathering of  planes and tanks has gotten a bit out of hand.  The following are two of my models. The B-17 looks like a beat-up bomber and the B-24 was painted with Testors' Metalizer. I like the B-17 because it looks like it's been around the block a few times, but it doesn't look over weathered. I think that the B-24 looks okay, but it still looks like a painted model. I am considering buying another B-24 and using Bare Metal Foil on it because I do not like the painted look. Yes, you can call me obsessive. 

 

For some reason, a lot of modelers get really riled up when I post photos of my BMF airplanes. There was a guy on the ARC Air website that really reamed me out for using BMF. He told me that he hated my models and that I should stop modeling. Talk about nuts!

I just think that using products like Alclad or Testors' Metalizer paints do not make for a realistic NMF (my opinion). The following is a photo of two of my F-86 models. The one on the left is finished with Testors' Metalizer Aluminum and the one on the left is BMF. The one on the left does not look shiny, but it doesn't look like real aluminum. It just looks like a painted surface. The one on the right looks like a real metal surface because it is real metal.

Following are two photos that I found on the Internet of F-104 planes models (these are not my models). They were painted with a NMF paint.  Both are well done models, but neither model looks like a real NMF because they were painted. Plus, IMHO, the panel lines are over accentuated. Just my opinion.

It is not possible, IMHO, to duplicate the subtlties of real metal with paint. Following is a photo of a real F-104. Checkout the appearance of the metal. It is not possible to duplicate that with paint. 

 

Following is a close up of my F-104. Notice the subtle panel lines and the "grain' of the metal panels. I do not think that it is shiny at all. It just looks like a clean plane with a metal finish.

Just one my thing. My F-86 is very shiny because I tried to duplicate a restored F-86. The top photo is a photo of a restored F-86 and and the second photo is my model.

Now that a got that off my chest I feel better!!!!!

Back to my first statement, "I agree, each to his own."  If a modeler likes using Alclad or Testors' Metalize to duplicate a NMF finish, more power to him/her. If someone likes to use BMF, more power to him or her. All that really matters is that they enjoy themselves.

By the way BlackSheepTwoOneFour, can you post some photos of your NMF airplanes? I would like to see them, maybe I can learn something new.

 

All your birds look awesome.  I am trying to build this P-47 as a restored plane, so I'm beginning to think the Bare Metal Foil is the only way to get it shiny enough.  Still testing other options though. 

 


On the bench: Eduard 1/32 P-47 Dottie Mae

In the queue: Tamiya 1/32 P-51 Mustang;  WNW 1/32 Fokker D.VII (Fok.) "Early";  Revell 1/48 B-25J;  AMT 1/48 Lockheed Vega;  AMT 1/48 Stinson Reliant SR-9;  Revell 1/48 TBF Avenger;  Hasegawa 1/48 Nakajima E8N1 Type 95 Reconnaissance Seaplane (DAVE) Model 1

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by MrStecks on Monday, September 18, 2017 1:26 PM

Tanker - Builder

 Firstly  , Mark ;

 Wash your bare metal plane gently with Dawn Clear and warm water , Wipe dry with a soft cotton cloth . Burnish with that cloth giving a final shine .

 Now apply your Decals . Then Clearcoat it with a semi Gloss or Gloss-coat of MM Boyd's clear . ( it doesn't yellow  ). As far as durability  .The first plane I did was a Revell Airliner for a dio .That plane is now thirty years old .

 The foil ? It looks like I did it this week . Has any fallen off or curled at the edges ? No .

 Remember this though , You MUST burnish slowly and carefully . Do NOT hurry the job . I don't even have trouble with the metal panels blending properly at the wing roots . The fairing Can be done in one piece .

 The trick here is to carefully look at the foil , It does have a grain ! This is from the weighted forming rollers taking it to this thin state . Then install the fairing in a direction that lets the grain go from toward the nose to the tail .

 Burnish GENTLY with a soft cloth rolled into a Ball after you have it all down tight . Go over it with a rounded Amuminum Hamdle that is glass smooth Gently bringing a higher shine to it .Then burnish one more time with the cloth .

 If you are not using Tamiya or one of the painters tapes then run the tape through your fingers gently before applying it . Don't do this heavily . Just a nice gentle firm pull .The tape Will seal well and it won't pull the foil off if when you remove it , If you fold it back on itself and pull gently .

 Oh ! Before I finish , I found out about the extra shine from aluminum being used in burnishing . I was burnishing the ends of a model car bumper where the seams had been removed . I wanted this to be absolutely NOT Noticeable .

   After using the side of one end of a NEW X-Acto handle it shone way better than I expected and the foil was not even noticeable at the edges . Then I rounded a number one handle and polished it till it was glass smooth .This has worked as a finishing foil tool now for some years .

 

 

Thanks for the tips TB, I appreciate it.  All signs are pointing towards using Bare Metal Foil on this project, but I'm still testing. 


On the bench: Eduard 1/32 P-47 Dottie Mae

In the queue: Tamiya 1/32 P-51 Mustang;  WNW 1/32 Fokker D.VII (Fok.) "Early";  Revell 1/48 B-25J;  AMT 1/48 Lockheed Vega;  AMT 1/48 Stinson Reliant SR-9;  Revell 1/48 TBF Avenger;  Hasegawa 1/48 Nakajima E8N1 Type 95 Reconnaissance Seaplane (DAVE) Model 1

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by MrStecks on Monday, September 18, 2017 1:28 PM

Hey All, thanks for continuing the discussion while I've been absent dealing with real-life issues.  Lots of good info here, that I am grateful to have. 

This is going to be a hellish week for me at work, and I have family coming to visit this weekend.  Probably won't do anything at the bench until next week!  Crying

Cheers, Mark

 


On the bench: Eduard 1/32 P-47 Dottie Mae

In the queue: Tamiya 1/32 P-51 Mustang;  WNW 1/32 Fokker D.VII (Fok.) "Early";  Revell 1/48 B-25J;  AMT 1/48 Lockheed Vega;  AMT 1/48 Stinson Reliant SR-9;  Revell 1/48 TBF Avenger;  Hasegawa 1/48 Nakajima E8N1 Type 95 Reconnaissance Seaplane (DAVE) Model 1

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Monday, September 18, 2017 1:46 PM

JohnnyK

Last night I e-mailed Randy Mason, the owner of Bare Metal Foil. I asked him  how long the adhesive is expected to last. He said that his father, the original owner of BMF, invented BMF about 40 years ago because he was looking for a more realistic way to obtain a natural metal finish on airplanes.  Remember back then there was no Alclad or Testors' Metalizer paint. Randy sent me the following photos of airplanes that his father made about 40 years ago. As you can see the BMF is still sticking to the models.

Most impressive...am more assured giving the stuff a try at some point in the future.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, October 05, 2017 10:36 AM

MrStecks ;

 Are you okay ? It's been awhile since you posted . Did the foil ever get started ? By the way , I am foiling a P-47  "Bubbletop" to represent Gabby Gabreski's plane . Hope to hear from you soon .  T.B.

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by bartenational on Thursday, October 05, 2017 1:21 PM

Thanks for a great thread topic, I visit the Wright Patterson Aif Force Base Museum once a year & am struck by how wrinkley all the planes are. This is almost impossible to replicate on a scale model. If you even wanted to. but here is a photo showing the aluminum nose of a bomber for reference. Obviously it is a matter of preference. 

just food for thought!

https://photos.app.goo.gl/iMJLceCF3lsd87fP2


 

living the dream 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/0sUvBqbiFEMH99Dn1

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by bartenational on Thursday, October 05, 2017 1:37 PM

Attached is a reference shot of the B-24 I took a few years ago, It is very flat almost gray looking in real life. but that can make a boring model... It also looks wrinkley especially around the waist gunner window... again I think what you are doing looks amazing! this is just for reference, getting caught up in "reality" can make people quit this hobby, but that should not be the goal in my opinion ... 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1Jh02RzWvjSbkcyYklOb0lfeUk/view?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1Jh02RzWvjSbkcyYklOb0lfeUk/view?usp=sharing


 

living the dream 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/0sUvBqbiFEMH99Dn1

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, October 05, 2017 2:06 PM

bartenational

Thanks for a great thread topic, I visit the Wright Patterson Aif Force Base Museum once a year & am struck by how wrinkley all the planes are. This is almost impossible to replicate on a scale model. If you even wanted to. but here is a photo showing the aluminum nose of a bomber for reference. Obviously it is a matter of preference. 

just food for thought!

https://photos.app.goo.gl/iMJLceCF3lsd87fP2

 

Wow, that plane looks like it was beaten with a rubber mallet.

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, October 05, 2017 2:08 PM

Tanker - Builder

MrStecks ;

 Are you okay ? It's been awhile since you posted . Did the foil ever get started ? By the way , I am foiling a P-47  "Bubbletop" to represent Gabby Gabreski's plane . Hope to hear from you soon .  T.B.

 

Tanker-Builder,

Do you have any photos of the P-47 that you could share?

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by bartenational on Thursday, October 05, 2017 2:37 PM
Ha ha ha ha!

 

living the dream 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/0sUvBqbiFEMH99Dn1

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