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Single action vs. Dual action

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  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Monday, June 23, 2003 10:44 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by glheald

If you have a dual-action airbrush then you also have a single-action airbrush.


Huh?

How is a double-action airbrush also a single-action?
It's a bit hard to keep the trigger held back in the same spot the whole time you are pushing down on the trigger. Wink [;)]

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, June 23, 2003 8:43 PM
If you have a dual-action airbrush then you also have a single-action airbrush. I use mine as a single-action sometimes, but it doesn't take much practice to get adept at using the dual action functions, and the results can be far superior for some applications.
I don't see any difference in cleaning a dual action or a single action.
Glenn
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Sunday, June 22, 2003 8:45 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by nwilliams

Does a single action air brush have any advantages over a dual action air brush?


Maybe price? Haha Wink [;)]

Everything a single-action can do a double-action can do better.

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Sunday, June 22, 2003 8:43 PM
I don't know why people think a single-action is easier to clean.

Double-action airbrushes are not hard to clean at all, you just remove the needle, clean it, the tip, the siphon tube and it's done. Not really that big of a deal.

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, June 22, 2003 5:18 AM
I started with a single action changed to a combined dual action and use now a dual action.
I agree with Dave you have a big learning curve with a dual action, but I believe you have better control over your paintjob. But also more can go wrong.
Good alternative is the combined dualaction sold by Hansa. As you pull back the lever the air starts to flow and pull it more back the air will mix with the paint.
I have no problem with cleaning both guns. I strip the guns after I finished spraying, and when using metallic paint I strip them in between.
The metallic will clock up the nozzle when used with the .15 nozzle.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, February 27, 2003 9:13 AM
Thanks for the great info. My double action does everything I have wanted it to do. I just thought I might be missing something by not having a single action but it doesn't sound like it.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by weebles on Thursday, February 27, 2003 8:49 AM
I've have both and I do 95% of my painting with the single action. It's much easier to use, set up time is reduced. It's also easier to clean. I clean mine with pipe cleaners and q-tips.

Technique is another issue though. I mask almost everything. Even when I have a soft edge. For most of my subjects the overspray from a double action looks out of scale so I'm always masking. You can achieve a scale soft edge by masking much easier than with a double action. However there are many subjects where about the only option is to use a double action. WWII Luftwaffe aircraft is a good example of that.

I just found there is a big learning curve with the double action. If you plan on doing some of these complicated camo schemes, it's the only way to go though. If you get into these free hand camo schemes, be sure to read a lot and practice a lot before you shoot your model.

Good luck
Dave
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 2:26 PM
Ditto.
A single action can be easier to clean (some say..), but I have a Paasche VL and I've never found it to be that difficult to clean. If you're not having any 'problems' with your current setup, I'd stay with it and just keep 'learing' that tool rather than throw another one in the mix...

M.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 1:26 PM
I would say not.

Theres nothing I can think of that a single action airbrush can do that a dual action can't do.

I once knew someone who had a single action brush (Binks Wren) and a Paasche dual action. He used the Wren for large single colour areas and priming and the Paasche for more detailed work and camoflage patterns.

He claimed the Binks brush made a more consistent and smooth overall coat for single color work, but I could never tell the difference between what he did with the Paasche and what he did with the Binks.

Stay with one dual action brush, being a Badger, its good stuff and should suit all your needs. Save your other money for kits or other tools.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Single action vs. Dual action
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 9:41 AM
I was just wondering. Does a single action air brush have any advantages over a dual action air brush? I have a Badger 150 dual action and I love it, but, it is the only airbrush I have ever owned. I wanted to know if having a single action also, would be helpful. I know many modelers own both, and it seems that most had the single action first, therefore it seems to be a natural progression to get a dual action. But is there a need to get a single action if I already have a dual action? Thanks in advance for your replies.

N.
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