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Washes

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Washes
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, June 30, 2003 2:08 PM
What are some good techniques for washes? Also, what kind of paints should I use? I've tried using water-based paints over Model Master acrylics, and it didn't turn out so well.

Thanks,

Eric
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Racing capital of the world- Indy
Posted by kaleu on Monday, June 30, 2003 2:28 PM
I paint the tank with enamels, then seal it with glosscote, then the wash. There are two types of washes you can use on your model: an all over wash or a pin wash. The pin wash is applied using a very small, pointed brush to the seams and lines of a model. The wash is drawn along the seams and lines of a kit by means of capillary action. This is the method that I prefer using on my kits. The all over wash is applied using a larger brush and covers the entire vehicle. Some modellers will then clean off the excess wash, some don't. It is entirely up to you. The ratio of paint to thinner is generally 80-20%. I use model paints and oils bought from an arts supply store. I use black, brown, raw umber, raw sienna and burnt umber. The best way to find out what type of wash you like best is to buy some older, cheaper kits and practice on them.
Erik "Don't fruit the beer." Newest model buys: More than I care to think about. It's time for a support group.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by Holley on Tuesday, July 1, 2003 12:06 AM
Eric
I have had good results using an acrylic base coat followed by a dilute oil wash. The excess oil can be cleaned off with a brush dipped in clean thinner. Just keep the brush clean or you will just push the wash around instead of removing it. It takes some practice, but that is what modeling is all about. I dont do the all over wash, usually I just wash panel lines and details that I want to stand out. To me, black doesnt work as well as dark grays or browns, it seems unnatural. Like Kaleu said, get some old kits and practice, practice, practice.
Holley When all else fails, read the instructions!
  • Member since
    December 2002
Posted by garyfo on Tuesday, July 1, 2003 11:20 AM
Kaleu: Why glosscote? Could you use dullcote to get the same effect?
Gary
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Racing capital of the world- Indy
Posted by kaleu on Wednesday, July 2, 2003 3:20 PM
A glossy (slick) surface helps the wash flow along the seams and lines of a vehicle. You could dullcote the vehicle, then apply a wash, but it's been my experience that a slicker surface is easier to wash than a non slick surface.
Erik "Don't fruit the beer." Newest model buys: More than I care to think about. It's time for a support group.
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Maine,USA
Posted by dubix88 on Wednesday, July 2, 2003 4:41 PM
HEY,
Check out the june issue of FSM. The covor story may help you.

Randy
THATS MY VOTE "If a woman has to choose between catching a fly ball and saving infant's life, she will choose to save the infant's life without even considering if there is a man on base." -Dave Barry In the words of the great Larry the Cable Guy, "GIT-R-DONE!!!"
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Sunny Florida
Posted by renarts on Wednesday, July 2, 2003 4:42 PM
Gloss coats have less particulate matter or solids in them, hence the reason they are gloss. They have a higher medium content so that when they dry, the medium comes to the surface and hardens making the surface smoth and more light reflective as a result. Flat coats or matte colors have more particulate or solids, breaking up the surface on the microscopic level. Light is scattered when it reflects off the surface giving the appearance of a dull finish. The result of a matte or flat coat though is more "tooth" to the surface which makes it harder to clean up later (the difference being maybe an extra stroke or two with a q-tip if using oils). It will not "run" (as kaleu pointed out) as far either as it would on a gloss surface and will not come away as clean (again as a result of surface "tooth").

Mike
Mike "Imagination is the dye that colors our lives" Marcus Aurellius A good friend will come and bail you out of jail...but, a true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn...that was fun!"
  • Member since
    December 2002
Posted by garyfo on Thursday, July 3, 2003 8:25 AM
Wow Renarts, that's the most detailed explanation I've ever seen of the difference between dullcote and glosscote! Very cool!
Gary

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