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Read any good books lately?

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  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, April 22, 2021 11:34 PM

HooYah Deep Sea

Which brings up a good point; are there any movies out there that are as good or better than 'the book'? I know that none that I've seen that were based on a book were as good as the book, and most were seriously sub-standard. 

 

A few come to mind. Gettysburg was an excellent film adaptation of The Killer Angels. The Bridges at Toko Ri was also a great adaptation of the novel. The Dogs of War did a fine job of translating that novel to the big screen, updating that tale from the late 60's to the early 80's. I'm sure that there are more.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Friday, April 23, 2021 8:57 AM

HooYah Deep Sea

Which brings up a good point; are there any movies out there that are as good or better than 'the book'? I know that none that I've seen that were based on a book were as good as the book, and most were seriously sub-standard.  

Off the top of my head, I can think of a couple of movies, or series, that were as good as the original books:

Fred Zinnemann's "The Day of the Jackal"

"The Odessa File"

"The Longest Day"

"Band of Brothers"

"Fellowship of the Ring" After that one, Jackson's films got progressively worse, as they deviated more from the books, both the remaining books of "The Lord of the Rings" and "The Hobbit".  He should have stuck with producing high-quality 1/32 scale kits of WWI airplanes

A list of movies which fail to capture the book from which they're scripted is probably more data than the forum's server can handle.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, April 23, 2021 12:38 PM

"The Day of the Jackal", and "The Odessa File" were both great movies, but I've never read the novels, so I can't comment on those. "Band of Brothers" and "The Longest Day" were both great in their own right, as was "A Bridge Too Far". But all had omissions from the source materials, and some composite/altered charterers for screen purposes that somewhat detract from what they could have been. 

A few films that I've seen that altered from their source books but came out so good that you love them as much if not more are: "The Right Stuff", "Bridge Over the River Kwai", and "Guns of Navarone". 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, April 23, 2021 12:47 PM

Jarhead and We Were Soldiers were pretty good - though the hollywood ending of We Were Soldiers was crazy not in the book, but made for good TV and they only covered X ray, the first 1/2 of the book.  Albany would make a movie in it's own right.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, April 23, 2021 1:32 PM

I never read Jarhead, but I did not care for the movie at all. Hopefully it was written better as a book than it was filmed. It did not have a tale worth really seeing as a movie. I would not have been happy paying movie theater prices to see it, even back when it came out. As a rental from wherever it was not even worth paying for to watch.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, April 23, 2021 2:52 PM

It really is more of a coming of age story set in a war zone than it is a war movie.  The book was well written.

Blackhawk down was pretty good come to think of it.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    January 2010
Posted by rob44 on Saturday, April 24, 2021 10:20 AM

There was a showtime original movie "Heroshima" that was superb in depicting the development  and political situation on both sides with the use of the Atomic bomb. If you can find the DVD it is well worth the time!

https://www.amazon.com/Hiroshima-Complete-Miniseries-Kenneth-Walsh/dp/B01IDHQYWY

 

 

 

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Saturday, April 24, 2021 11:30 AM

Stikpusher mentioned Gettysburg / The Killer Angels; but though I did enjoy the film, it lost alot in the transformation. In the book you always knew where you were and what part of the battle(s) was occuring. In the movie, if you were not a student of the ACW, or at least Gettysburg, there were several points that would be confusing.

And on top of that, even back then, there were very few trees on the battlefield at Little Round Top. It was not in the woods as depicted. THey could have found a more appropriate area.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, April 24, 2021 12:51 PM

I just started reading Killer Angles

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Saturday, April 24, 2021 1:19 PM

keavdog

I just started reading Killer Angles

 

A great read,and a decent movie.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 9:13 AM

Re-reading William Shirer's "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" for the umpteenth time.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 9:44 AM

the Baron

Re-reading William Shirer's "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" for the umpteenth time.

 

That's good,I struggled thru that book once,it was tough reading,not what I expected.

Funny story, when we were selling our house,the realtor saw it on my shelf with the big swastika on the spine,and said that it had to go or people might be turned off and leave.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:18 PM

keavdog

I just started reading Killer Angles

Were they obtuse or acute angles? LOL!

"Killer Angels" was required reading when I was an ROTC cadet in the 1980s, along with a trip to Gettysburg. PA.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:39 PM

lol spelling has never been my strong soot Huh?

And I'd say the north were right angles  Stick out tongue

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 3:11 PM

I'm reading "The Map Thief", true story of a map dealer with a top reputation who was caught stealing old maps.

No spoiler alert there- that's all on the dust jacket.

Great book so far.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 4:37 PM

^^^^ That looks interesting.  I have an interest in cartography.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 6:06 PM

I do too, in particular ones that are very pictoral with illustrated borders and buildings, plants and people and animals on them.

You would probably like this book. I've only started it.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    February 2005
  • From: Nashotah, WI
Posted by Glamdring on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 8:54 PM

I have been spending the last 6 months re-reading Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan series from book one.  Am finally up to Executive Orders, which was the first Clancy novel I read 23  years ago in the 8th grade.

Keep saying I will take a break, but this far in I may as well stick it out and finish the rest on my Kindle.

Robert 

"I can't get ahead no matter how hard I try, I'm gettin' really good at barely gettin' by"

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Tuesday, April 27, 2021 9:16 PM

recently read a really good book called The Candy Bomber about the circumstances around the Berlin Airlift.  The book starts in 1945 and ends at the end of the airlift.  Its well written and includes samples of the letters the pilot recieved from the kids.  

  • Member since
    September 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Wednesday, May 26, 2021 9:40 AM

Just finished up "The British Are Coming" by Rick Atkinson. A great book on the first two years of the the Revolutionary War. First book in a trilogy so looking forward to the next releases. He has a way of making non-fiction books read like fiction.

-Andy

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, May 26, 2021 11:45 AM

GMorrison

I do too, in particular ones that are very pictoral with illustrated borders and buildings, plants and people and animals on them.

You would probably like this book. I've only started it.

 

Bill

 

loosley related, Longitude is a fantastic, amusing and too short book.  

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Wednesday, May 26, 2021 12:33 PM

I just finished Ender's Game and one of the Casca the Eternal Mercenary books (the first one in the series). Once upon a time, I had most of the Casca books. Now I'm down to two.

Casca is the Roman legionnaire who stabbed Jesus with his spear so he would die quicker. Jesus then cursed Casca to be a soldier until they meet again. He becomes immortal and the series of books follow him through his times as a Roman soldier, WW1 soldier, WW2 soldier, Mongol warrior, etc.

They are good, quick reads written by the man who wrote and song the Ballad of the Green Berets. Dime store novels that are quite entertaining.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, May 26, 2021 12:47 PM

rooster513

Just finished up "The British Are Coming" by Rick Atkinson. A great book on the first two years of the the Revolutionary War. First book in a trilogy so looking forward to the next releases. He has a way of making non-fiction books read like fiction.

 

That sounds like something I would love to read. I need a good Revolutionary War book or two, and I do like his work. His WWII trilogy and Desert Storm book, Crusade, are all excellent reads. He certainly knows how to put life into his writing.

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Thursday, May 27, 2021 10:48 PM

I've just started reading a science fiction series by Martha Wells called The Murder Bot Diaries. They're a great read but short.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, June 1, 2021 10:06 AM

i just read a book, first of a trilogy, called "The Stranger", from the Big Sur Trilogy.

Three generations of an American pioneer family in that area 1830-1930.

There's a movie named "Zandies Bride", made in 1974 with Gene Hackman and Liv Ullman.

 

Bill

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Tuesday, June 1, 2021 11:51 AM

Just got Goodbye Transylvania by Sigmund Heinz Landau,about a German-Romanian Waffen SS soldier.A vivid account of Eastern Front warfare

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Tuesday, June 1, 2021 12:50 PM

Just finished "The Bomber Mafia" by Malcomb Gladwell.   Gladwell is an author & podcaster who specializes in the unintended consequenses and backstory behind the story.

In the 1930s at the USAAC's Air Tactics School at Maxwell Air Base in Alabama, a group of instructors, called the Bomber Mafia, came up with the idea that air power and precision bombing could prevent a stalemate war such as the First World War. Their tactics would also minimize civilian casualties by attacking only military targets They got the Norden Bombsight that allowed the bombardier to put a bomb 'down a pickle barrel from 30000 feet'.   Fast heavy bombers were on order and would be operational soon.   An electrical failrue in the northeast power grid caused delivery backups at the Hamilton Propeller plant affecting aircraft production.   This in part shaped their tactical thinking.

Among the staff at the school was Haywood Hansell, soon to be the head of the 8th Air Force at the start of the war.   Hansell persisted when the Army Air Corps was sought to join the RAF in night saturation bombing.   'We can put a bomb down a pickle barrel from 30000 feet.'  -- But you have to be able to see the pickle barrel.   Weather conditions were not ideal in Central Europe.   Searching for a target and remembering the Hamilton Propeller incident - they found that most of the German ball bearing production was in and around Schweinfurt.   General Hansell's attack plan called for a diversionary raid on Regensburg.  Tie up the German fighters and have them on the ground refueling an rearming when the main attack came through.

Named to lead the diversion was Curtis Lemay.   Lemay was not part of the Bomber mafia.  Lemay, knowing that the attack would launch early in the morning, had is aircraft practice early morning takeoffs and rendezvous in typical English morning weather.  When the day of the attack arrived, Lemay's forces took off on schedule and attacked Regensburg, drawing the fighters as expected.   However the follow-on forces were held on the ground due to morning fog.  Surprise was lost, diversion was lost, advantage was lost.    Hansell was soon removed and rotated to other command in the Pacific.   General area bombing became necessary to put the number of bombs on target necessary - violating the goals of the Bomber Mafia.

In the Pacific, Hansell was in command of B-29s at Guam.   In attacking the Japanese mainland, they could seek the targets but could not hit them due to the jet stream phenomenon.   Unknown before then the bombsight could not account for the high wind speed.   Head winds in flight also caused many bombers to be lost due to fuel depletion on the return flight.

Hansell was replaced by, you guessed it, Lemay.   Lemay brought the bombers down from 30000 feet to 5000 feet and began night time saturation bombing including incendiaries.   

The lofty goals of the Bomber Mafia, including minimizing civilian damage and casualties was overcome by wartime necessities and General Curtis Lemay

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, June 1, 2021 1:08 PM

I seem to remember Ira Eaker being in charge of 8th Air Force before being replaced by Jimmy Doolittle in early 1944. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    February 2011
Posted by GreySnake on Tuesday, June 8, 2021 11:15 AM
I’ve recently completed reading all of the Horatio Hornblower books (twelve in total) by C.S. Forester. Most of the books were rather enjoyable. A couple books were rather lackluster one was finished after his death and the last book in the series was a collection of short stories and didn’t match previous books in the series.
  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Tuesday, June 8, 2021 11:31 AM

Finished book one, The Terminal List, of the Jack Carr series, and am now half way through book two, True Believer. Thus far there are four books in the series, written by a former U.S. Navy SEAL. Lots of tech but not overly 'techie', and of course, lots of action. Good stuff, and plenty of inspiration for my own writing!

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

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