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Whats cookin

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  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Monday, July 22, 2019 12:49 PM

A friend has an avocado tree which produces fruit which resemble a cross between bowling pins and eggplants.  The flesh is the creamy type, not stingy at all.  So each year I eagerly await a paper bag full of heavy fruit.  I tried making guacamole but I am terrible at it, so I usually ask a former co-worker to make me some in exchange for some of the coveted avocados.  This time my sister's friend made me some, so it was Nacho Day last weekend!

I usually only use restaurant grade tortilla chips, but I got a bag of Tostitos with the guacamole so I used it.  Not too bad actually.

And a big shout out to Nino, who solved my annoying Flickr problem of url junk before and after my photos.  Thank you Nino!!!

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    July 2008
Posted by Est.1961 on Saturday, July 6, 2019 5:14 PM

Ate out this evening with my wife and son, looking out the restaurant window I thought people could be forgiven for wondering where in the world we were. I had the the sea food platter definitely go back again some time.

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  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, June 23, 2019 9:43 PM

Brined pork chops in maple syrup, salt, sugar and herbs.

Garlicky greens from the garden.

Baked sweet potatoes with Cajun spice.

Paired up with our friend Dana's Kumquat mock marmalade.

Next day flatbread with chopped pork, plums, balsamic vinegar, ricotta and carmlized red onions.

\

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, June 10, 2019 1:06 PM

Dr. John passed away last Thursday. A real NOLA legend, a unique individual. In honor of him, I put together a Gumbo last night.

Fry up some chicken thighs in seasoned flour.

 

Save the leftover flour and the frying fat for the roux. 

Ummhh! Nice dark chocolate color.

Toss in the Holy Trinity NOLA style- chopped red and green peppers, onion and celery. It stops the roux from getting any darker.

Add by the spoonful to the hot broth to make the base soup.

Add the Andouille sausage and garlic/ scallions.

Cook for 45 minutes, chop up and add back the chicken, and serve!

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Monday, March 18, 2019 1:13 AM

As I'm 50% Irish, 50% Manx here's my obiligitory corned beef and cabbage

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Thursday, February 28, 2019 9:08 PM

I make a couple of dishes things that usually come out pretty well.  First is Apfel Kuchen, a German style, apple pastry that is actually very simple to make.  Second, I have a great recipe for pizza, homemade crust, sauce and all.  Third, Chines style beef and broccoli, which is simpler than it would seem.  Sorry no pictures, I haven't made any of them in some time.

John

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, February 25, 2019 8:57 AM

Last night made some beef short ribs using a Charlie Trotter recipe. Why are short ribs sooooooooo expensive? Any opinions? Think about it. Half of what you are buying is bone.

Your comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    December 2018
Posted by Tosh on Sunday, February 24, 2019 3:39 PM

Japanese white rice

 

Reside in Streetsboro, Ohio

 

  • Member since
    December 2018
Posted by Tosh on Sunday, February 24, 2019 3:36 PM

Corn in butter sauce

Reside in Streetsboro, Ohio

 

  • Member since
    December 2018
Posted by Tosh on Sunday, February 24, 2019 3:34 PM

Shoyu (Soy Sauce) Chicken

 

Reside in Streetsboro, Ohio

 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Sunday, February 24, 2019 2:31 PM

I’m glad it’s close to dinner time because I‘ve certainly gotten hungry reading this thread. My cooking skills aren’t bad, but they’re no where as good as I see here. Lately I’ve been trying my hand at baking. I’ve only done sweets so far, but I definitely want to try baking bread. Here are some pics of a few of the things I’ve made so far.

The first are brownies made with walnuts, dried cherries and chocolate chunks.

The next one is fruitcake. Now I know what a lot of you are saying, but this isn’t the kind you find in the round tin that lasts for 30 years. No, this is very tasty.

The last one, I just finished making this afternoo. This is a hot milk cake topped with chocolate ganache. I haven’t tried the cake yet, but the ganache is to die for.

 

 

 

Cary

 


  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, February 21, 2019 11:39 AM

I need a crockpot. She really wants to get one.

Last night I made Chicken Marsala. It has to be about the easiest thng in the world, esp. with thin fillets available at the store.

Component parts:

And ready for consumption:

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, February 17, 2019 9:08 PM

That's patience GM.  Looks great.

Tonight is a crockpot chicken tortilla soup made by my wife.

 PS I have two Shun Knives.  You can send your knives back and they will sharpen/recondition for no cost.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, February 16, 2019 10:28 AM

Great dishes, cold weather food. I roasted a chicken from the "Zuni Cafe Cookbook". Salt rub, tucked fresh thyme under the skin, went into the refrigerator on Monday. Roasted with high heat on Thursday, 475 for an hour.

Served on a bread salad dressed with vinagrette and chicken drippings.

 

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, February 15, 2019 8:35 PM

 

Those dishes look fantastic Ygmodeler4.

 

Tonight, these are lambchops with rosemary, thyme and garlic.  Done with the sear and just about to finish in the oven.  They were delicious.

 

 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Sunday, February 10, 2019 2:34 PM

Outstanding, Ygmodeler4! 

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Northern Virginia
Posted by ygmodeler4 on Sunday, February 10, 2019 2:30 PM

Wowzers a cooking thread! I've found myself in the kitchen far more times than the modeling bench over the past year. Here's some of the past couple weeks' meals:

 Untitled by Josiah McDonald, on Flickr

Homemade Pho with Goose

 Untitled by Josiah McDonald, on Flickr

Some Shrimp and Sausage Jambalaya in the trusty cast iron

 Untitled by Josiah McDonald, on Flickr

Duck and Chicken Paella

 

-Josiah

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Friday, January 25, 2019 11:25 AM

Real G,

That Cream of Chicken looks really good especially on a cold winter night here in Chicago.

Your comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Friday, January 25, 2019 2:17 AM

MrStecks

Some delicious looking meals in this thread.  Mmmmmmm.....

I don't usually take pictures of my food (since most of it comes out of the microwave), but after looking through this thread I thought I'd share one of my favorite comfort foods.
It's hashbrown potatoes, with fried linguica sausage and chopped scallions.

Linguica is a Portuguese sausage, and is one of my favorites. If you haven't tried it, I highly recommend it.
My all-time favorite sausage is andouille sausage.  I combine it with ground bison when I make my Cajun chili.  Have won a couple chili cook-offs with it. 

Cheers,
Mark

 

Mr Stecks,

My mouth watered while I was reading the description and staring at the pic!

We have Portugese sausage here in Hawaii, and it is a local favorite.  Just throw on a fried egg and it’s a breakfast!

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    May 2017
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by MrStecks on Thursday, January 24, 2019 8:08 PM

Some delicious looking meals in this thread.  Mmmmmmm.....

I don't usually take pictures of my food (since most of it comes out of the microwave), but after looking through this thread I thought I'd share one of my favorite comfort foods.
It's hashbrown potatoes, with fried linguica sausage and chopped scallions.

Linguica is a Portuguese sausage, and is one of my favorites. If you haven't tried it, I highly recommend it.
My all-time favorite sausage is andouille sausage.  I combine it with ground bison when I make my Cajun chili.  Have won a couple chili cook-offs with it. 

Cheers,
Mark


On the bench:  Revel 1/48 B-25J Mitchell

In the queue: Tamiya 1/48 F4U-1A Corsair

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Thursday, January 24, 2019 12:56 PM

JohnnyK

Last night we made minute steak AKA cube steak. You know what I mean, the thin beef steak with the square dimples in it. The term "minute steak" is really incorrect. If that cut of beef is only cooked for a few minutes it will be as tough as shoe leather. If cooked correctly it will be more tender than beef tenderloin. 

Salt and pepper the steaks and dredge them in flour. Brown them in a pan. Remove the steaks and add onions and mushrooms. Cook until tender and add beef broth. Place the steaks back into the pan and bring the liquid to a boil. Turn the liquid bown to a low simmer. Put a lid on the pan and slowly simmer (do not boil) for two hours. Remove the beef and make a gravy from the liquid. Serve with noodles. The beef will be fall apart tender. A knife will not be required.

Johnny K,

That sounds good, I think I'll try it out!  Eats

Here's a dish for the kitchen-challenged (but also a favorite of mine), cream chicken.  Pepper and flour chicken pieces, lay in a baking pan with a square of butter or margarine on each piece, bake @ 350 degrees F for 30 minutes, then dump a can of Campbell's cream of chicken soup on the chicken, garnish with parsley flakes, up the oven temp to 425 degrees F and bake for another 15 minutes.  I line the pan with heavy foil so cleanup is a snap.

https://flic.kr/p/Sg47RN] [/url]Cream Chicken by N.T. Izumi, on Flickr

 

 

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, January 23, 2019 3:25 PM

JohnnyK

Last night we made minute steak AKA cube steak. You know what I mean, the thin beef steak with the square dimples in it. The term "minute steak" is really incorrect. If that cut of beef is only cooked for a few minutes it will be as tough as shoe leather. If cooked correctly it will be more tender than beef tenderloin. 

Salt and pepper the steaks and dredge them in flour. Brown them in a pan. Remove the steaks and add onions and mushrooms. Cook until tender and add beef broth. Place the steaks back into the pan and bring the liquid to a boil. Turn the liquid bown to a low simmer. Put a lid on the pan and slowly simmer (do not boil) for two hours. Remove the beef and make a gravy from the liquid. Serve with noodles. The beef will be fall apart tender. A knife will not be required.

Now there's a childhood memory!  Mom used to make cube steak a lot; if I remember correctly,  it's generally a cheaper cut.  She used to brown it and then cook it in the pressure cooker.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Wednesday, January 23, 2019 12:38 PM

Last night we made minute steak AKA cube steak. You know what I mean, the thin beef steak with the square dimples in it. The term "minute steak" is really incorrect. If that cut of beef is only cooked for a few minutes it will be as tough as shoe leather. If cooked correctly it will be more tender than beef tenderloin. 

Salt and pepper the steaks and dredge them in flour. Brown them in a pan. Remove the steaks and add onions and mushrooms. Cook until tender and add beef broth. Place the steaks back into the pan and bring the liquid to a boil. Turn the liquid bown to a low simmer. Put a lid on the pan and slowly simmer (do not boil) for two hours. Remove the beef and make a gravy from the liquid. Serve with noodles. The beef will be fall apart tender. A knife will not be required.

Your comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    July 2008
Posted by Est.1961 on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:36 PM

Thank you Real G 

Know what you mean I've swopped the lamb for ham, chicken even sausages before now as they were available in the fridge.

  • Member since
    January 2019
  • From: Southeast Kentucky
Posted by The Drifter on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:31 PM

I have to say each of the meals presented on this post look amazing, and delicious. I to like to cook, and I'm always up to trying new dishes. I will post some photos soon. Still working on a photo image site to download my photos. 

Jeff

 

On The Bench: Coming Soon

  • Member since
    July 2008
Posted by Est.1961 on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:23 PM

GMorrison

So 1961 we have Father Murphy coming for dinner in March. Tell me about the lamb stew.

 

Families have their own recipes the methods handed down no measurements. Amount dictated by mouths to feed and appetites. 

Lamb usually neck and or cutlets

Potatoes, Carrots, Parsnips, Swede and Onion.

Vegitable stock

Bunch of thyme and 2 bay leaves

Sprinkle lamb with flour brown in a stew pot ( large deep pot) quarter 3 onions chop vegetables into  large chunks add to pot with potatoes fill with vegitable stock drop in thyme and bay leaves bring to a boil, reduce heat and cook for a hour and a half longer if necessary no rules. Towards the end you can place more potatoes on top to hold their shape if you want, the original potatoes will have broken down and thickened the stew. I like to give it a good stir during the cooking process.

Serve with crusty bread.

Hope you enjoy. 

Joe

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:17 PM

Est.1961

 

 
Real G

I still enjoy mom’s cooking though she is no longer here - what I make is based on what she used to make for me.  My most cherished are her beef stew and twice baked potatoes.  I only make the potatoes on Thanksgiving, so they are extra special.  Shucks, I should have photographed them - they came out nice last year.

 

 

 

A lovely post Real G touched a chord my mum passed away suddenly in May last year, have been making favourite dishes lamb stew being at the top and her caraway seed cake she always had whenever I popped in.
 

I am very sorry to hear about the passing of your mother 1961.

My mother sat me down and showed me how to make the potatoes back when I was in high school, as I had bugged her to show me.  I learned how to do it quickly, as they are simple but just time consuming.  The stew took a lot longer to get right (I made a couple of really bad batches), but now can do it just by memory.  My mom started off with a recipie from a Japanese cook book, but deviated considerably as I found out when I tried to make it after her passing.  My Japanese vocabulary is limited to things like infra-red, machine cannon, variable geometry wings, reinforced armor and such, so the cook book was challenging to descipher!  Some of the instructions were questionable - who stews meat for only 20 minutes?

Such recipies are a labor of love.  When time does not permit, we fall back and punt.  Last night I used some leftover Christmas turkey in the freezer, some sad veggies in the fridge, and I made turkey casserole.

https://flic.kr/p/2cYpNEz] [/url]Casserole by N.T. Izumi, on Flickr

The panko crumbs on top give it a nice crunchy texture!

  

 

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 9:19 AM

So 1961 we have Father Murphy coming for dinner in March. Tell me about the lamb stew.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2008
Posted by Est.1961 on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:55 AM

Real G

I still enjoy mom’s cooking though she is no longer here - what I make is based on what she used to make for me.  My most cherished are her beef stew and twice baked potatoes.  I only make the potatoes on Thanksgiving, so they are extra special.  Shucks, I should have photographed them - they came out nice last year.

 

A lovely post Real G touched a chord my mum passed away suddenly in May last year, have been making favourite dishes lamb stew being at the top and her caraway seed cake she always had whenever I popped in.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, January 21, 2019 10:17 PM

Up here in the B we need a piece of fried chicken with that brake pad.

Cooking Gumbo tonight. Was going to show all of the mis en place but it's not Rachel's show all.

This one is Chef Paul, but my own version. So here's my book on gumbo, and I am not from NOLA so take it for what it's worth.

Most good Nola cooking, whether cajun or creole, has three main parts.

Ingredients.

Thickener and vegetables.

Starch to serve it on.

Ingredients are the proteins, whether sea food or land animal, amphibian or bird. Orthodoxy in both gumbo and other stews like paella state that they can't be mixed, but I don't agree as long as the cook doesn't go over the top. Tonight's gumbo won't have seafood, although I live in one of the seafood capitals of the US.

Holiday, big storms; boats didn't go out.

I'm going with chicken and smoked sausage.

Thickener falls into either a roux, which as you know is a flour/ fat glue; okra; or file which is ground sassafras leaves. I have never liked file that much.

I really like roux but I also like okra, so I go with both. It's a little tricky, but if you keep the roux on the side until you finish the gumbo, then add it by the spoon; it can be the thing.

Rice.

So it's on simmer, your cook will return in 30.

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

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