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Tube glue, testors cement

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  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: USA
Tube glue, testors cement
Posted by nsclcctl on Monday, May 12, 2003 10:13 AM
This is a dumb question I never thought I would ask but how do people use glue from a tube? Do they squirt a small amount on a blotter and use a tool to add to the parts being glued together or add the glue directly from the tube? One way is clearly wasteful. I am curious what way gives the best results without a lot of glue smearing around but certainly enough to do the job. This is particulalry important for small scale stuff, guns on 1:700 scale ships and 1:72 planes and so forth. Ideas and comments are appreciated. Big Smile [:D]Kisses [:X]
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by Snacko on Monday, May 12, 2003 10:47 AM
Heavy use of toothpicks.

- Snacko
  • Member since
    January 2003
Posted by shermanfreak on Monday, May 12, 2003 11:20 AM
Agree with Snacko on this one. Toothpicks, pins, just about anything to stop directly trying to apply the glue to the model. A little wasted glue on a blotter is a small price to pay for a clean model build.
Happy Modelling and God Bless Robert
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 12, 2003 11:52 AM
don't use tube glue, can't stand the stuff, gets spider webs every where and ruins a model quiker than anything else
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 12, 2003 1:48 PM
I use the Testors liquid cement in the 1oz (29,5 mL) bottle (No. 3507). If you trim off the very tip of the stem you get a hole about 1mm and it works great.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 12, 2003 3:11 PM
if you use the Testors Non-Toxix cement, you won't get those spider webs.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, May 14, 2003 9:45 AM
For thin glue, take a sewing needle, cut off just the end of the bit that the cotton goes through. Dip it into the glue and the glue will sit in the recess until applied to the model. This may sound like an advert, but i haven't used tube glue for years, since I started using revell Contacta. it's thin, flows nicely, and the tube applicator means you can get to apply it in small amount's, just where you want it. Also guys, try superglue ( not near clear parts) and Elmers (on clear parts) they both have their places on the model desk. Elmers can also make a good filler for seams/joints that are difficult to fill because of their location.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, May 14, 2003 3:17 PM
I use the testors liquid in a black plast bottle, tenexR7, microweld and cyanacrylics. Along with some epoxy's.

The tube stuff is so cliche', ick! Try the microweld, 2 seconds plastic is physically joined together and with cleaner joints.

The non-toxic stuff stinks, no good. Yuck!
  • Member since
    April 2014
Posted by r13b20 on Sunday, October 12, 2003 4:19 PM
I still use testors tubes. With the plastic tips of course. I use liquid also and clear/ canopy maker glue. (testors also) I think I'll try super glue to.
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Dahlonega, Georgia
Posted by lizardqing on Sunday, October 12, 2003 5:19 PM
I used to use only testors tubes till i tries the super glue route. Now the testors is at the bottom of my box since I now don;t have fight the spider webs and the models come out looking a whole lot cleaner. Not only that but the time saved on holding parts together makes it all that much better.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 12, 2003 6:14 PM
Only super glue for me. Why mess with something that's been working fine for years?
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Philippines
Posted by Dwight Ta-ala on Sunday, October 12, 2003 6:41 PM
I use superglue to join the structural parts of the model where joints are usually not so visible. I apply it with a pin or needle.

I use Tamiya Thin Cement for very tight joints that are very visible. It has a very thin bristled applicator so application is clean and easy.

I use elmer's clue for clear parts applied with a very thin brush.

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 12, 2003 6:52 PM
I only use CA for building. If something clear needs to be glued, I use gloss paint. Personally, I can't stand the tube stuff. Haven't used it since I was 10.

demono69
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 12, 2003 8:23 PM
Ambroid Pro Weld applied with needle tip Touch-n-Flow applicator.
Tube glue with a needle only if the part needs to be moved into place and I need time to attach it.
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Washington State
Posted by leemitcheltree on Sunday, October 12, 2003 9:55 PM
Mate, I haven't used tube glue in over 20 years.
The stuff is awful - with all the stringy bits, the "sometimes" adhesive quality...........just can't stand it.
Use any number of liquid cements on the market. Humbrol, Testors, Tamiya, Pastruct, Tenax - they all make great glues that quickly dissolve the surface contact area and actually "weld" the two bits of plastic together. Makes it much easier to fill joins and seams. I actually almost never (almost, I said) use filler - I put the two pieces together and hold them gently, apply a good amount of luquid glue (not enough to cause runs) and wait 20 seconds or so, then apply pressure. The melted plastic of the mating surface actually "oozes" out of the seam, effectively filling the depression or indentation of the seam. I end up using much less filler this way. Plus, the filler is now made of the same material as the rest of the piece. No more paint reacting with the filler, as sometimes happens with automotive type acrylics.
Or, use superglue as an adhesive. As an adhesive, it has fantastic tensile strength, but poor shear strength.
Cheers,
LeeTree

Cheers, LeeTree
Remember, Safety Fast!!!

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 12, 2003 10:47 PM
I have a piece of flat hard plastic about 3"X3" I cut a piece of 2" masking tape to apply to the piece of plastic. I use this as a blotter. I also use toothpicks as the applicator. The toothpick can be sharpened with a knife to any size point you may need. When the glue job is complete simply peel off the masking tape and discard.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, October 13, 2003 9:01 PM
I am using Tenax 7R exclusively for my corvette frame, and I'll be using CA for the plating, because I don't want the Tenax to bleed through the thinner plastic.
I have used LeeTree's method to make simulated welded seams, that seems to work the best.

For wooden models I use carpenter's glue, CA, epoxy, or Ambroid depending on the application.

No tube glue here, I agree with the others' negative comments.
Nruce
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 9:53 PM
I use Tamiya & Testor's liquid cement. I also use Zap-A-Gap on the harder to join parts.

I haven't used tbe glue since I started using the liquid form.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Sunday, October 26, 2003 1:26 AM
I don't use tube glue and Testors liquid works better as a brush cleaner than a glue. Ambroid or Tenax applied with a Touch-n-Flow or a drafting pen is what I mostly use nowdays.Wink [;)]

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 26, 2003 1:49 AM
I bought Testors liquid cement 3502, and it stinks..... I use CA glue and occasionally tube glue..........


I guess this is somewhat like airbrushes, you use what your used to using!?
  • Member since
    August 2003
  • From: South Australia
Posted by South Aussie on Sunday, October 26, 2003 5:16 AM
Like Lee Tee haven't used tube glue for about 20 or more years. I now only use liqiud base cements for plastics or super glue for resin or brass.

Wayne I enjoy getting older, especially when I consider the alternative.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 26, 2003 7:08 AM
Hey Dwight...How do you like the Tamiya thin? Is it really quick drying? Im asking because I picked up a jar a Looooong while back for $1.00....Never even been opened just kinda sitting there in the tool box...
Chris
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