SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Kitty Hawk F-86D Dog Sabre 1/32

1282 views
20 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Kitty Hawk F-86D Dog Sabre 1/32
Posted by Aggieman on Friday, March 18, 2022 4:06 PM

One of my latest two builds is a variant that I had never built but was nonetheless fairly familiar with.  I remember some excitement over the kits that were coming from a new manufacturer called Kitty Hawk.  They had that F9F Cougar that I grabbed (still in my stash), and despite having picked up a 48th scale F-86D, I could not resist picking up this 32nd scale kit to go along with that smaller one.

Let me just say right up front that I did not have any fun building this thing.  This was not my first Kitty Hawk build; that was their goofy XF5U Flying Pancake.  I had no issues with that Pancake kit.  Which is why this Dog Sabre caught me off guard.

For starters, the kit is chock full of details that will never be seen.  There is a complete engine inside the fuselage, along with the associated intake trunk and exhaust cone.  The cockpit is fully outfitted.  Early on, I ran across a photo from a build review of this kit, where the fella doing the building was apparently as frustrated as I would become, and took a picture of one of the sprues with his free hand giving that sprue the finger.

Kitty Hawk engineered this thing to very exacting fit tolerances.  If anything is not exactly set as intended, you're going to find lots of downstream issues.  It's possible this is what plagued my build, but I really don't think so, as I dry-fitted everything many times over and never saw the fit issues that I'd see once the glue was out.  The fuselage is a multi-part construction. You put the engine into the forward section right behind the cockpit.  The exhaust nozzle extends out of that front section, and you are to mount the rear section around the exhaust nozzle. My problem was that the rear section would never mount flush with the forward section with all the various parts in both those sections.  I ended up cutting off a quarter inch of the nozzle from its connection point to the engine.  (There is nothing provided that would allow you to build with the rear section pulled off; I was not interested in scratch building the cart that ground crews used when servicing the exhaust nozzle portion of the engine).

But that was not the end of my difficulties.  The forward section of the fuselage contains the intake trunking that ended up being too long to fit inside.  Again, I had to remove some of the plastic to get the trunking to fit correctly.  Still, that was not enough.  That modification did allow for the bottom portion of the nose cone to fit flush against the intake trunking, but the nose cone itself (which concealed a radar unit that I left off) did not fit flush against the forward fuselage.  There was no amount of pushing it into place that would eliminate a huge gap between cone and fuselage.  I ended up cutting two discs of .015mm sheet styrene that allowed for a much better fit, and after holding the cone against the fuselage for a good 10 minutes to allow for the glue to set sufficiently, I had a good fit.

Paints are AK Interactive XTreme Metallics - aluminum, dark aluminum, white aluminum, and jet exhaust.  Black and green zinc chromate from Mission Models.  As with the 1/48th Dog Sabre, I originally planned to build the boxart kit, but decided that the Texas Air Guard aircraft was more a natural fit for this native Texan.  Problem was, that build required orange (Aggies don't like orange due to the school in Austin), but as it so happened, I'd needed some orange on a Star Wars B-Wing build I did a couple of years ago, so I was good to go.  I added the black borders around the orange stripes as well.

Decals were of good quality, although I wish I'd trimmed the yellow stripe on the rudder better than I did, as you can see some overlap (it's a two-part decal for the rudder and the control surface).  Or better yet, I should have just painted the thing, but had already placed the logo atop the yellow stripe when I noticed how bad the yellow stripe looked.

So one might think that by this time in my story, all was well.  But no, my problems were not done.  This morning I was doing some touch-up painting (wing tip lights), when I lifted it for a bit of a closer look and managed to clip the rear part of the model against one of the light fixtures that I mounted above my workbench.  This managed to dislodge my grip on the model, and down it went.  It crashed onto the workbench surface and all I saw were several parts come off the model.  I mean, with all the trouble I had with this thing, it's not surprising the blind rage that built up in me at that moment.  I saw myself HULK SMASHing this turkey ... but I stepped back long enough to see just what the damage was.  One of the stabilizers and one of the drop tanks had popped off, the front gear was gone, and one of the main gear was askew.  That was it.  I finally located the front gear half way across the work room, and then was able to effect the necessary repairs.

Photos indicate that the main gear is still askew, so I'll need to do some more work on it.

Now, after all the trouble I had with this one, I actually think I did a good job overcoming all of that.

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Friday, March 18, 2022 7:16 PM

I'm at the point in my modeling journey, about 2 1/2 years, where it's tough for me to overcome the issues you described.  I find the really gifted modelers can get passed these annoying setbacks.  I admire your ability to stick it out and you got rewarded with a great result.  The gear leg is jacked up but you mentioned that will be fixed.  I think you nailed the various metal tones and the weathering is spot on.  Doesn't it feel good to clear this off the bench?  Once again, well done my friend.

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Friday, March 18, 2022 7:18 PM

wpwar11

I'm at the point in my modeling journey, about 2 1/2 years, where it's tough for me to overcome the issues you described.  I find the really gifted modelers can get passed these annoying setbacks.  I admire your ability to stick it out and you got rewarded with a great result.  The gear leg is jacked up but you mentioned that will be fixed.  I think you nailed the various metal tones and the weathering is spot on.  Doesn't it feel good to clear this off the bench?  Once again, well done my friend.

 

Thanks for your kind words!

Yes, it does feel good to get this thing off the bench.  I can typically crank out a model in a month or less, and while I admittedly built two simultaneously here, these Sabre Dogs took two full months.  

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, March 19, 2022 12:14 AM

Turned out nice.  I like the weathered NMF.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Saturday, March 19, 2022 2:44 PM

That's a great looking model. The weathering is outstanding.

Your comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Between LA and OC, SoCal
Posted by oortiz10 on Saturday, March 19, 2022 2:54 PM

Problems aside, you cranked out a nice looking Sabre Dog. I really like the markings on this one. Well done!

-O

-It's Omar, but they call me "O".

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, March 20, 2022 1:30 PM

Aggieman
I actually think I did a good job overcoming all of that.

I'd agree with that. 

All of my memories of the Dogs was much later in their lives, when al the visibilty orange (at least it's not "burnt") had faded to that near-impossible-to-model mottled faded mange sot of hue.

You really caught the "looks like a scrap metal bin" way the NMF always looked on those birds.

Only "problem" I see is you now need a TAG F-100, if only because our most famous Yell Leader few both Smile

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Sunday, March 20, 2022 5:33 PM

CapnMac82

 

 
Aggieman
I actually think I did a good job overcoming all of that.

 

I'd agree with that. 

All of my memories of the Dogs was much later in their lives, when al the visibilty orange (at least it's not "burnt") had faded to that near-impossible-to-model mottled faded mange sot of hue.

You really caught the "looks like a scrap metal bin" way the NMF always looked on those birds.

Only "problem" I see is you now need a TAG F-100, if only because our most famous Yell Leader few both Smile

 

Thanks Capn!

As for our most famous Yell Leader, all I can come up with as far as a name is Rick Perry.  But I didn't find that he flew anything other than a C-130.  Perhaps there is a more famous Yell Leader that I simply am not remembering?

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Sunday, March 20, 2022 5:34 PM

keavdog

Turned out nice.  I like the weathered NMF.

 

Thanks Keavdog!  While I was doing the last of the weathering, I was not liking what I was seeing.  I kept adding a bit more, but at some point I decided I was teetering on the edge of over-doing it.  I think I picked the right stopping point.

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Sunday, March 20, 2022 5:34 PM

JohnnyK

That's a great looking model. The weathering is outstanding.

 

Thank you for your kind words Johnny!

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Sunday, March 20, 2022 5:35 PM

oortiz10

Problems aside, you cranked out a nice looking Sabre Dog. I really like the markings on this one. Well done!

-O

 

Thank you O!  I was a bit dubious about the orange (given my disdain for the color, but as Capn points out, it's not of the burned variety) but I'm glad I went with this one.

  • Member since
    February 2011
Posted by knox on Sunday, March 20, 2022 6:28 PM

You did a great job on the model. I bet it’s plenty impressive in real life. 

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Building models on my kitchen counter top~somewhere in North Carolina
Posted by disastermaster on Sunday, March 20, 2022 9:38 PM

All's well that ends well. You really pulled a rabbit out-of-the-hat with this project. Looks super.

On the kitchen counter top in North Carolina

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Monday, March 21, 2022 6:21 AM

knox

You did a great job on the model. I bet it’s plenty impressive in real life. 

 

Yes, it is impressive.  I'm actually wondering if it is truly 1/32, as it literally dwarfs the 1/48 build that I did.

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Monday, March 21, 2022 6:22 AM

disastermaster

All's well that ends well. You really pulled a rabbit out-of-the- hat with this project. Looks super.

 

Thank you, disastermaster, for your kind words!

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: Omaha, Nebraska
Posted by learmech64 on Monday, March 21, 2022 7:36 AM

Aggieman, You are a brave soul taking on Kittyhawk kits. I have attempted 2 of thier kits and both ended up in the trash. Its to bad because they have good interesting subjects but the kits are dogs. Looks like you did a fine job on this one though. you are a better man than I. 

Regards

Doug

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Monday, March 21, 2022 8:42 AM

learmech64

Aggieman, You are a brave soul taking on Kittyhawk kits. I have attempted 2 of thier kits and both ended up in the trash. Its to bad because they have good interesting subjects but the kits are dogs. Looks like you did a fine job on this one though. you are a better man than I. 

Regards

 

Thank you for your kind words, Doug!

I could probably bank a bunch of money if I had a dime for every time I considering going all HULK SMASH on this thing.  I referenced the photo I found online of someone giving the sprues the finger - I can see after the experience of just how on-point that photograph was.

Thankfully I have but one Kittyhawk subject left, a 48th scale F9F-8 Cougar, in my stash.  Given this experience, I now expect more of the same, sadly.  Only in a smaller scale.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Monday, March 21, 2022 11:00 PM

Looks great, Stephen.  And thanks for the warning, I'll keep avoiding this one!

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.htm

 

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Tuesday, March 22, 2022 8:08 AM

jeaton01

Looks great, Stephen.  And thanks for the warning, I'll keep avoiding this one!

 

Thank you John!

It is a buildable kit, clearly, but it will try your patience on more than one occasion.  I'm starting to get to the point that I'd rather avoid such experiences as well.

  • Member since
    February 2015
Posted by skyraider0609 on Tuesday, March 22, 2022 10:55 AM

That turned out really nicely. I'm glad I don't live alone on "Calamity Island". I'm a firm believer in Murphy's law. Rule 144: the odds of a drop increase exponentially the closer a build is to being finished. Been there. Done it. Nice recovery though, as nobody would know it dropped looking at the images.

 

 

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Katy, TX
Posted by Aggieman on Wednesday, March 23, 2022 6:54 PM

skyraider0609

That turned out really nicely. I'm glad I don't live alone on "Calamity Island". I'm a firm believer in Murphy's law. Rule 144: the odds of a drop increase exponentially the closer a build is to being finished. Been there. Done it. Nice recovery though, as nobody would know it dropped looking at the images.

 

 

 

Thank you for your kind words! Some times I wonder if Murphy lives in my workshop.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.