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The X-Files Group Build

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GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, September 1, 2023 3:21 PM

ROSTER:

PFJN2:  Pro Resin 1/72nd Avro 707C

GAF:  Tamiya 1/72nd Bell X-1 Mach Buster (Complete)

          Revell 1/68 D-558-2 Sky Rocket (Complete)

Bobbaily: Monogram 1/24th Olds Aerotech

Gamera: Fujimi 1/144th Nakajima G10N Fuguku

               Amusing Hobby 1/35th FV4005 Stage 2 Self-Propelled Gun

Lostagain: TBD

Real G: Xtrakit 1/72nd Saunders-Roe SRA-1

             Meng 1/72nd Ki-98 Mansyu

Jeaton01: Special Hobby 1/72nd D-558-1 Skystreak (Complete)

Cwalker3: Takom 1/72nd Krupp Raumer S  (Complete)

                  Takom 1/72nd Minenraumer  (Complete)

Keavdog: Monogram 1/72nd  X-15 (Complete)

                 Revell 1/65 Douglas X-3 Stiletto

Trabi: ELF models 1/72nd DFW T.28 Floh

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, September 1, 2023 3:22 PM

COMPLETED BUILDS:

GAF:  Tamiya 1/72nd Bell X-1 Mach Buster

Revell 1/68 D-558-2 Sky Rocket

Cwalker3: Takom 1/72nd Krupp Raumer S

Takom 1/72nd Minenraumer

Keavdog: Monogram 1/72nd  X-15

Jeaton01: Special Hobby 1/72nd D-558-1 Skystreak

  • Member since
    January 2021
Posted by PFJN2 on Friday, September 1, 2023 7:04 PM

Hi,

Can I enter my Pro Resin AVRO 707C?

Pat

Avro 707C, Pro Resin R72-029 (2007) (scalemates.com)

707C

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, September 1, 2023 7:19 PM

Pat,

Oooooohh!  I like that!  A small-scale Vulcan.  Sure you can enter it.  I've got you down on the list.  Smile

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Friday, September 1, 2023 8:14 PM

Gary,

Please add me to the list-Oldsmobile Aerotech-if it meets the criteria.

https://www.scalemates.com/kits/monogram-2901-olds-aerotech--129291

Brief history of the vehicle:

https://www.supercars.net/blog/1987-oldsmobile-aerotech-st/

Thanks

Bob

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, September 1, 2023 8:59 PM

Bob,

That's quite the car!  Got you down.  Will love to see that one built.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, September 4, 2023 10:25 PM

Gary would you put me down for the 1/144th Fujimi Nakajima G10N Fuguku please?

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, September 5, 2023 8:34 AM

Your on the list.  Looks like a fun build.

BTW, Happy After-Birthday!  Happy Birthday

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, September 5, 2023 7:36 PM

Thanks Gary! 

I had lobster sushi and my mom brought me a homemade chocolate pie. Life is good.... 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, September 5, 2023 10:10 PM

I'll skip the lobster sushi, but everyone loves chocolate pie!

You're supposed to boil the bait before you eat it.  Wink

Gary

  • Member since
    April 2014
  • From: Australia
Posted by lostagain on Sunday, September 10, 2023 7:25 AM

Lobster sushi! very fancy Cliff.
Mine was a week ago, out for breakfast and roast pork for dinner.

Here is my possible roll call for this GB. Not sure that the Pfiel qualifies as there were 37 made and 11 delivered.

Disappointed I don't have a X-wing...

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, September 10, 2023 8:51 AM

Lostagain,

Sounds like you and Gamera have birthdays very close together.  Congrats to you!

As for the Do-335, it makes it into "very few" produced, so yeah, it qualifies!

Don't worry!  You have just over a month to decide.  They all look like good models.  As a suggestion, I think the Caudron would be a good choice as it would fit in your planned French GB.  I'll put you on the list.  Smile

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, September 12, 2023 9:43 PM

Belated happy birthday Piers! The roast pork sounds delectable! 

And lol I'll have to remember the bait line about sushi Gary. 

I like all of those Piers! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Wednesday, September 13, 2023 2:18 PM

I'm looking for that perfect X-Plane to pull from the stash.  It HAS to be really weird, yet buildable in a reasonable amount of time.

So the scratchbuilt XF-103 is out.  Stick out tongue

 

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, September 13, 2023 2:37 PM

Real G,

Well, there's a lot to choose from (depending on the availability of a model).  As a suggestion, here's a list of SOME of the better known types.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_experimental_aircraft

As for experimental tanks, the MBT 70 and the XM-1 come to mind.  And many race cars had prototypes built before they entered production.

You've got may choices!

Gary

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, September 13, 2023 2:45 PM

Hoping someone does the XB-70.  I poked around for an X-15  but the prices are crazy.  I'll be watching though :)

 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Wednesday, September 13, 2023 3:21 PM

Gary,

I only need to open the storage boxes labelled "X-Planes" in my closet!  So many (too many) to choose from.

I have a few X-Tanks, like the Maus, the E Series panzers, some oddball Soviet postwar armor, and a PL-01.

I'm still waiting for a good US MBT-70.  The DML "Black Flag" kit is more a West German version.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, September 13, 2023 8:12 PM

I have been thinking of maybe swapping out mine for this FV4005. British Cold War tank destroyer with a 182mm gun, the biggest gun EVER mounted on a AFV hull. The British built one and killed the project when every time you fired the gun the recoil almost ripped the turret off the thing's hull...

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, September 15, 2023 12:10 PM

John (Keavdog)> I found one of the Revell boxings at a local model show for $15.  I'm sure that if you look around you can find one.  Be patient.  Would love to have you for this group build, sir.  I know you do awesome work.  Smile

Real G> Should I put you down as "To Be Determined"?  Sound like you have a lot of choices.

Gamera> Well, I wouldn't want to influence you, but why not do both?  The GB will last a year.  Big Smile

To everyone else who expressed an interest, please post here for confirmation.  I don't want to put anyone down who doesn't feel up to it or thinks they don't have a model  that fits.

Gary

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Friday, September 15, 2023 1:12 PM

Gary,

Sure, please put me down as TBD.  Thanks!

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, September 15, 2023 8:28 PM

Real G>  Okay, your on the list.  Looking forward to your choice!

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, September 15, 2023 9:00 PM

K Gary I'll aim at both!!! 

We'll see how it turns out... 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, September 15, 2023 10:35 PM

Gamera> That's the spirit!  At least you can say you tried!  Wink

And I didn't realize until I blew up the image that the turret has "April Fool" written on it!

Gary

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Tuesday, September 19, 2023 1:20 PM

Okay, I'm officially jumping in!

Here is the current state of play, photo taken last night:

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, September 19, 2023 1:29 PM

^^^^ Neat-o!

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, September 19, 2023 6:15 PM

That's great, Real G!  Such an odd aircraft.  Similar to the Convair XF2Y-1 Sea Dart.  Looks simple enough.  Good choice!

Gary

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Wednesday, September 27, 2023 4:06 PM

Here are two I recently finished.  You can put me down for a Special Hobby 1/72 D 558-I Skyrocket.

 

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, September 27, 2023 9:27 PM

John,

Those are two beautiful Convair delta wing designs!  Nice!

Got you down.

Gary

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Friday, September 29, 2023 10:29 AM

If approved, I would like to join in with Mengs Krupp Raumer S and Minenraumer in 1/72. These were prototypes of mine-clearing vehicles produced by the Germans in WW II. A review of the kit be found here:

https://finescale.com/product-info/kit-reviews/2021/01/workbench-review-takom-krupp-raumer-and-vskfz-617

 

Cary

 


GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, September 29, 2023 8:17 PM

Two very interesting vehicles.  I've got you down.  Do you plan to do them both?

gary

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Saturday, September 30, 2023 9:46 AM

GAF

Two very interesting vehicles.  I've got you down.  Do you plan to do them both?

gary

 

Yes, please put me down for both.

Cary

 


GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, October 1, 2023 8:08 PM

Just two weeks until the official start date of the GB.  However, if you wish to get an early start, I won't stop you.  The "official start" is just my way of keeping track of when the GB is to end.  Anything up to 50% leaves you a lot of leeway.  Smile

Gary

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Tuesday, October 3, 2023 10:50 AM

I think I'll take you up on the early start. This arrived in the mail today:

  " alt=" " />

I forgot how small 1/72 can be. Should be a couple of fun builds.

Cary

 


GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, October 3, 2023 12:08 PM

If your eyesight is poor (like mine), you'll remember how SMALL 1/72nd can be!  Clown

OTOH, looks like something science-fictiony.  A couple of Star Wars Storm-Troopers beside them wouldn't look out of place.

I may have to get an early start also.  While browsing through the local antique mall I found this model of a 1991 release of a G8N1 Renzan.

It was $25, and fits into the GB as only four prototypes were built.  I figure it will fit into Gamera's Japanese GBs easily.  Big Smile

Gary 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Wednesday, October 4, 2023 5:25 PM

Gary, I mistakenly listed Meng as the maker of my kit. It's actually Takom. Thanks.

Cary

 


GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, October 4, 2023 7:33 PM

Corrected.  I was wondering about that.  Smile

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, October 4, 2023 8:28 PM

Great choices guys! 

Love those Cary, they do look like something out of a 'Road Warrior' movie. 

Gary, super cool! I've got a 1/72nd G8 around here somewhere. Mine was in a Revell boxing. I wonder if it's the same kit just reboxed. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, October 4, 2023 11:47 PM

Gamera,

Are you sure its a Revell boxing?  Looking at Scalemates, AMT and FROG have released it, but no Revell.  Maybe under a different name, like "Rita"?

Gary

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Thursday, October 5, 2023 6:38 PM

I would like to insert a second iron in the fire (hi no naka ni nibanme no tetsu):

Constant bombing raids and news of the Red Army approaching the factory have delayed this project for some time.  If the kit meets the criteria for less than 50% built, I'd like to put it in the queue. 

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, October 5, 2023 8:06 PM

Certainly, Real G!  You're on the list.  That one looks certainly under 50%. (Gorufukurabu wa sore dakede jŇębundesu ka?)

I consider 50% to be completely assembled with cockpit painted, but the rest of the paint and decals not on (or thereabouts).  YMMV.

Gary

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Thursday, October 5, 2023 10:16 PM

Gorufukrurabu?  A Japanese friend once told me "Neeru-San, in gorufu, you no get three strike."

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, October 6, 2023 9:29 PM

Gary: I'm not sure. I looked for the kit but couldn't find it. I thought it was Revell though. Maybe a different kit, maybe I'm imaging it. I dunno...

Real G: Very cool! It's an awesome looking plane. I wish someone would do it in 1/48th. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, October 11, 2023 5:46 AM

Gamera,

I hate it when that happens.  Wink  And I didn't know of this aircraft, so I'm surprised it is even in 1/72nd!

Just a few more days until this GB gets underway.

Gary 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Wednesday, October 11, 2023 11:00 AM

I seem to recall seeing a Hasegawa B-47 in an AMT box, so maybe that was the case for the Rita.

I would love it if Hasegawa went back to their large 1/72 aircraft catalog and made new kits.  They already did the Betty and Emily, but there must be demand for the others as I regularly see them being built, like the P-3 Orion, which seems to be one of their evergreen kits.  I'd really like to see new kits of the Rita, Mavis, Marlin and B-47.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, October 14, 2023 12:38 AM

It's time to begin the X-periment.  I hope I'll make it interesting for you guys, so most of all, have fun!  Nothing I hate more than beginning a project only to have many things go wrong.  Let's hope all of your builds are trouble free!

Meanwhile, since this is the anniversary of the breaking of the sound barrier, I'll include a little write up on the aircraft I'm building, the Bell X-1 (or XS-1).

     The Bell X-1 is one of the most significant aircraft in the history of aviation. It was the first manned aeroplane to exceed the speed of sound in level flight, a feat it achieved on October 14, 1947.  This marked a critical point in aeronautical research and forever changed the course of aviation, paving the way for the development of supersonic and eventually, hypersonic flight.
     In 1944, during the last years of World War II, the U.S. Army Air Forces and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA, the precursor to NASA) jointly launched a research project aimed at breaking the “sound barrier”—a perceived limit to how fast an aircraft could fly without suffering severe aerodynamic problems.  The initiative was given the name “XS-1,” with the “X” standing for “experimental” and “S” for “supersonic”.
     Bell Aircraft Corporation was selected to develop the aircraft in 1945.  The X-1 was powered by a Reaction Motors XLR-11 rocket engine, which used ethyl alcohol and liquid oxygen as propellants.  Additionally, a unique launch process was used whereby the X-1 was carried aloft under the belly of a modified B-29 or B-50 bomber to save fuel, before being air-dropped for its flight.
     Test flights were conducted at Muroc Army Air Field (later renamed Edwards Air Force Base) in California, a location chosen for its remote desert setting and long, flat surface—ideal for the X-1’s skid-based landing system. X-1 was approximately 30.9 feet long with a wingspan of about 28 feet. Its overall height stood at around 10.4 feet. The aircraft adopted a shape reminiscent of a .50 calibre bullet, known for its stable flight even at supersonic speeds.
     The fuselage of the Bell X-1 was constructed from K-Monel, a robust and corrosion-resistant copper-nickel alloy, designed to withstand the immense heat and pressure generated at supersonic speeds.  Its windscreen was made of quartz and was capable of handling temperature up to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
     In conclusion, the Bell X-1 was more than just an aircraft; it was a marvel of engineering, embodying the dreams and ambitions of the time.

 

I'll post up pictures of the actual model parts later.  Looks interesting.

Gary

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Saturday, October 14, 2023 2:04 AM

And it had...  The Right Stuff.

I'll get my coat.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, October 14, 2023 9:46 PM

Real G

And it had...  The Right Stuff.

I'll get my coat.

Well... someone did.  Big Smile

The kit itself is interesting.  There are 3 versions you can paint up, and it comes with four fuselages.  Two halves are transparent, so you can show the internal workings of the rocket system.  If you only had two more wings and tail you could build two different versions.  Maybe I'll try to make them and build two, but not for this GB.

Also, it comes with convenient ball bearing for weighting the nose.  I guess it would be a tail-sitter without it.

Of course, I intend to build it wheels-up, so no need for worrying about weight.

Anybody know what color orange I should use?

Gary

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Monday, October 16, 2023 12:57 PM

Okay, kicking off the GB with a test fitting.

The Meng Ki-98 fits like a glove.  The Xtrakit SR.A/1, not so much.  Not even a little.  Not even a little bit.  Holy time warp, Batman, it's like MPM back in the 1990s!  But I big boy so I no cry.  It's the 21st century, and I have my tools of destruction and skillset (HA!) to deal with this kit.  A fellow over on Britmodeller, I believe, recently did this kit to an exceptional level of fit and finish.  So the bar is set.

But yeah, the Ki-98 is super simple by comparison, so it will get done first.

Oh yeah, some potted history:

 

The Saunder-Roe SR.A/1 was borne from a late 1940s Royal Navy requirement for a jet propelled seaplane fighter.  The idea was that the need for vulnerable forward air bases would be eliminated, allowing the fighter to be deployed almost anywhere there was a body of water.  Three protoypes were constructed, and while they exhibited decent flying characteristics, it was felt that their performance fell short of the land based jet fighters that were being developed at the time.

Notable features included use of the first production Martin Baker ejection seats and an ingenious outrigger float retraction system that rotated the floats so that they nestled under the wings in an inverted positon to cut drag.  Two were lost in accidents, and the sole surviving aircraft currently resides in the Solent Sky Museum.

 

The Mansyu Ki98 was a late WW II Imperial Japanese Army ground attack aircraft project that didn't proceed as far as the Saunders-Roe fighter.  I beilieve a prototype was under construction, but all materials and documents were destroyed to prevent them from falling into Aliied hands.  The Ki-98, although fantastic looking for an IJA aircraft, was similar to a number of successful designs like the SAAB J 21 and DeHavilland Vampire.

The Ki-98 was designed for ground attack, so a pair of 20mm and a single 37mm cannon were to be housed in the nose.  Power was to come from a turbo-supercharged 2,000 HP engine buried in the fuselage and cooled by flush slots and no doubt an internal fan.  Another unusual feature was the tricycle landing gear, necessary due to the rear mounted pusher propeller.

Its IJN cousin, the Kyushu J7W1 Shinden, got a bit further with a completed prototype and even a few test hops.  The Shinden was designed to be a bomber interceptor, but both it and the Ki-98 featured heavy nose mounted cannon armament, pusher engines in the 2,000 HP class, and tricycle landing gear.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Monday, October 16, 2023 1:28 PM

Gary,

I think the X-1 was painted a straight orange, not the day-glo or international red that subsequent prototypes were painted.  I have seen some photos of the real X-1 looking faded on top during testing, probably due to the scorching sun.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Monday, October 16, 2023 4:44 PM

Real G-no doubt in my mind that you'll have both kits whipped into shape in no time.  And thank you (and Gary with the X-1) for the history behind the planes.

I was able to get some work done on the Olds Aerotech.  Got the body primed and had an extra tail section for the long tail-decided to see if I liked Tamiya spray Gloss Aluminium (left side) or Tamiya acrylic Chrome Aluminum (air brush with Tamiya lacquer thinner)-right side.  Think I'm gonna go with the rattle can for the gloss finish.  Now I'll tape off and spray/airbrush some Gunmetal Gray and see if that works out.

Assembled the short tail chasis/floor pan-not the best of fits but nothing that super glue and putty didn't fix

Did some dry fitting and and now aware that this kit might not be best served to leave the upper body panels unglued to the chasis pan-we'll see but maybe the engine cover and cowling might be left unattached.

Primed chasis with Indy Car sub-structure primed-chasis interior will get airbrush aluminium and Indy Car fuselage with be black-Carbon fiber would be better but black is close enough...

Probably won't get much more done until Thursday but pleased with not waiting until close to the end of a GB to get started.

Bob

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, October 16, 2023 9:20 PM

Real G,

Thanks for the write-ups on the Ki-98 and the SRA-1.  I was planning to do episodes on X-craft as a feature of the group build to keep it interesting, and to learn something.  Always happy when someone beats me to it.  Smile

As for the problems with fit of the SRA-1, I guess that can be expected.  Hopefully, they won't be too much of a problem.

And as for the color, I did a bit of research last night.  I think Testors orange might be close enough according to sources.  We'll see.

Bob,

That is nice!  I think the rattle can gloss looks best on the left side.  I like to get an early start on GBs, as I usually run into problems that make me months late.  YMMV. 

 

As for me, I've cut out the pit and fuselage to see how they fit.  I don't expect any problems with it since its from Tamiya.  I'm not sure about the color call-outs, however.  I get various colors from different sources.  Guess that's too be expected too.

I've made a tracing of the wing on some plasticard to use on a future version.  Luckily, Tamiya provides a canopy for a later version, though no pit.  Looks like some scratch-building in my future.  Smile

The Testor bottle is there to show size.  A pretty small aircraft.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, October 16, 2023 9:36 PM

To keep up the X-perimental nature of this group, I present the

Oldsmobile Aerotech

At the end of 1984, the development of Oldsmobile Quad 4 engine was beginning. It was an inline-4 engine incorporating four valves per cylinder and dual overhead camshafts, an innovative technology used on a four-cylinder engine at the time. Oldsmobile advertised the engine to be highly fuel efficient and powerful. The engine generated a maximum power output of 150 hp (112 kW) and 160 lb⋅ft (217 N⋅m) in its standard configuration, outclassing the four-cylinder engines developed by German automobile manufacturers BMW and Mercedes, even rivalling Honda's 2.5-liter V6 engine.

By the end of 1986, the construction of the first car was completed; the car was tested by A. J. Foyt at the General Motors proving grounds at Mesa, Arizona. Foyt, who was initially skeptical about the car's potential, admired the car's capabilities as he managed to take the car to speeds up to 218 mph (351 km/h) on the test track. Foyt is said to have admired the car for its stability at high speeds.

After the successful runs at the General Motors proving grounds, the development team decided to put Welburn's long-tail design to test as well. Construction of a second car in this specification had begun in late 1985. The second car was almost the same as the first but featured elongated rear bodywork tapering downwards and a different engine, departing from the original 2.3-liter single turbocharged Quad 4 engine built by Batten to a twin turbocharged 2.3-litre Quad 4 engine, built in collaboration with Fueling Engineering. The new engine proved to be even more capable than its predecessor and generated a maximum power output in excess of 1,000 hp (746 kW).

On August 26, 1987, the development team, in the presence of FIA officials, tested the two completed cars on the Fort Stockton test track. Initial tests with the short-tail version of the car resulted in an average speed of 250.919 mph (403.815 km/h), falling close behind the closed-course speed record set by the Mercedes CIII-IV development prototype. As the team went on to adjust the car's aerodynamics, A. J. Foyt tested the second car (long-tail version). The long-tail version proved to be even more capable than its short-tail sibling and allowed Foyt to attain a top speed of 275 mph (443 km/h) at the flying mile after some practice runs.

The next day, Foyt set a new speed record with the long-tail version, averaging 267.399 mph (430.337 km/h) after flying-mile runs in both directions of the track. The runs made with the now improved short-tail version, shortly after, resulted in a new closed-course speed record of 257.123 mph (413.799 km/h), beating Mercedes' record by a big margin.

Oldsmobile produced three versions of the original Aerotech to prove the capabilities of the company's Quad 4 engine. Two cars were built with shorter rear body work and were called Short Tail versions (ST), and one was built with a longer rear body work and thus called the Long Tail (LT).

Subsequently, between December 7 and 15, 1992, another version of the Aerotech, this time powered by a 4.0-litre Oldsmobile Aurora V8 engine and now fitted with functional lights, broke 47 speed endurance records, including the 10,000- and 25,000-kilometre world speed records. Other national and international speed records ranging from 10 kilometres to 24 hours were accomplished by a team of drivers working 24 hours a day for 8 days. These records were also set at the Fort Stockton test track.

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, October 20, 2023 1:06 PM

Finished up the pit and glued the stabilizers on.  Not the greatest, but its done.  The red blob is my attempt to create a pilot figure.  We'll see how it goes.

I then glued on the wings.  I've put together the stand that comes with it.  This is where she is now.  I'll attempt to refine the pilot figure and give her some filler and primer next.

She's coming along nicely.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Friday, October 20, 2023 3:43 PM

She looks good Gary.  Think I'm going to have to add that kit to my stash-makes more sense than the Revell 1/48 kit-especially for space purposes.

If you are building Yeager's record setting flight, be sure to add broom stick to the cockpit Wink

And thank you for posting the info for the Aerotech.  I did get most parts primed today and hope to paint the body tomorrow.  Still researching the color(s) for the floor pan.  Nice thing is that there are plenty of pics online.

Bob

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, October 20, 2023 7:45 PM

Those look great guys! Sorry I've been a little out of the loop but hopefully I'm back now. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, October 21, 2023 12:31 AM

Bob,

Thanks!  It's a nice little kit.  You actually get two for one, as long as you can make some wings for it.  I'll include the broom handle just as soon as I find a saw small enough.  Wink

I was meaning to ask, is this the long-tailed or short-tailed version?

 

Gamera,

I understand you've been down with the flu.  Hope you're feeling better!  Take care of yourself.  This is just a hobby, after all.  Smile

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Saturday, October 21, 2023 6:21 PM

Gary-Short Tail version.  Hope to pick another one up someday and build the Long Tail.

Bob

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Saturday, October 21, 2023 9:16 PM

Gary: Thanks, I'm feeling a lot better now. 

I still have some stuff to finish up by the end of the year but I'm thinking of getting a little work done on the FV2005. The suspension system is so complicated I can work on it during some downtime. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Sunday, October 22, 2023 1:04 AM

bobbaily

Gary-Short Tail version.  Hope to pick another one up someday and build the Long Tail.

 

Bob, email me.  jeaton01(at)gmail.com

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, October 22, 2023 6:56 AM

Bob,

Sounds like a plan.  I hope Jeaton has something for you.  Big Smile

Gamera,

The complicated track system is why I stay away from armor!  Good luck!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, October 22, 2023 7:20 AM

The FV4005 "Doombarn"

The development of the L4 started in 1950, and was aimed at increasing the firepower of the ‘Heavy Gun Tanks’. This was a uniquely British designation that was not governed by tank weight, but the size of the gun. A requirement was formulated for a tank armed with a gun capable of defeating a 60-degree sloped plate, 6 inches (152 mm) thick, at up to 2,000 yards (1,830 meters), a feat impossible even for the powerful 120 mm L1 gun of the FV214 Conqueror. By 1950, Major General Stuart B. Rawlins, Director General of Artillery (D.G. of A.) had concluded that there was no gun available with that level of ballistic performance and an investigation was launched. Initially, the British Military looked at the development of a 155 mm gun that would be standardized with the USA. However, even this lacked the required punch and, as such, 6.5 and 7.2 inch (165 and 183 mm respectively) High-Explosive Squash Head (HESH) shells were looked at.

It was not until December 1952 that the designation of the gun was officially updated to 183 mm. The design of the gun was accepted and was serialized as the ‘Ordnance, Quick-Firing, 183 mm, Tank, L4 Gun’. In reality, only the HESH shell underwent further development and the number of charges was dropped to one. The 183 mm L4 became one of the largest and most powerful tank guns in the world.

The design of the vehicle would be held in limbo, ready to go into production if necessary. This stopgap vehicle would be based on the Centurion of the FV4000 series, with the original turret removed. The vehicle would go through two ‘Stages’ or ‘Schemes’. ‘Stage 1’ was built to test the gun and its mount on the Centurion chassis. The ‘Stage 2’ was a finalized design and would be the production standard. The vehicle was given the designation of ‘Heavy Anti-Tank, SP, No. 1’ – ‘SP’ standing for ‘Self-Propelled’. Officially, the FV4005 was never given the traditional British ‘C’ name such as the FV4101 Charioteer and FV4004 Conway before it.

In total three prototypes were ordered – a single Stage 1, and two Stage 2s. The FV4005 would fill the role of a ‘Heavy Gun Tank’. As such, the vehicle would engage targets from long-range, firing over the heads of attacking lighter tanks.

The Centurion was chosen as the basis for this vehicle and three Mk.3 hulls were removed from service for the prototype development. Other than the removal of the turret and various small additions, the hull would remain mostly unaltered. Armor on the hull remained the same thickness, with about 3 inches (76 mm) at roughly 60 degrees on the front slope. A 650 hp Rolls-Royce Meteor petrol engine, located at the rear of the vehicle, propelled the tank. The Centurion used a Horstmann style suspension, with 3 bogies per side carrying 2 wheels each. The drive sprocket was at the rear with the idler at the front. The driver was located at the front right of the hull.

The Stage 2 was built closest to what a production version of the FV4005 would consist of. As such, a number of changes were made between the two Stages. The biggest change was the design and construction of a fully enclosed turret to the form of little more than a large box. The loading assist for the loader was also deleted, and the concentric recoil system was replaced by a hydropneumatic type.

The turret was welded and fabricated from ½ inch (14 mm) thick steel and was there to protect the crew from small arms fire and shell splinters. As this was intended to be a second line vehicle that would keep out of the range of enemy AFVs, the FV4005 did not need really thick armor. There were two hatches on the roof and one large door on the rear. The roof hatches were two-piece and, in front of them, were two single periscopes installed in the turret roof.

Like the Stage 1, the Stage 2 featured a recoil spade installed at the rear of the vehicle. However, on the Stage 2, a hand-cranked winch was installed on the rear of the vehicle to lower the spade.

Despite the general success of the project, the FV4005 suffered much the same fate as the FV215. The feared Soviet heavy tanks, like the IS-3, which these vehicles were designed to defeat, were not being made in the massive numbers expected, indicating a shift in policy to lighter, more maneuverable, and more lightly armored tanks. The need for ‘Heavy Gun Tanks’ like the Conqueror, FV215 and the FV4005 stand-in, from this perspective, was simply becoming absent. Other changes were also taking place as technology-wise, larger caliber guns with their huge ammunition were becoming obsolete by improved anti-armor performance of smaller guns and by the appearance of a new generation of accurate Anti-Tank Guided Missiles (ATGM).

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, October 22, 2023 9:09 PM

Thanks Gary! Guess I should have posted that but I'm lazy.... Sleep

 

I love the British, they don't do anything halfway! The whole thing is so batguano over-the-top you have to love it. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, October 23, 2023 4:05 PM

Gamera,

I'm going to post information on lots of X-craft, so it's not necessary for people to post information about their builds.  Big Smile

To build a tank destroyer you think they might have built one like the Stug or SU-100.  The turret with such a large gun reminds me of the Tiger in "Kelly's Heroes" being unable to turn.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, October 23, 2023 6:34 PM

Yeah, the turret is like the one on the US Army's M-18 Super Hellcat where they replaced the normal 76mm gun with a 90mm. The commander was given strict orders never to fire the gun with the turret turned more than 30 degrees from centreline since they were worried the recoil would flip the whole TD on it's side or upside down. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, October 24, 2023 5:03 PM

There's some minor filling and sanding left to do, but she's about ready for paint.  I'll see if I can give her a coating of primer tomorrow.

Overall, this is an enjoyable build.  The wheel covers fit snugly, so there was minor filll required.  The only fill that's really required is the part at the rear of the canopy.  Don't know why they didn't make it part of the main fuselage or canopy instead of a separate piece.  Oh, well!

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, October 25, 2023 6:32 PM

Looks good Gary! Looking forward to seeing the cool orange on there! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Thursday, October 26, 2023 1:18 PM

I'm going to go ahead a get started. This a 1/72 combo kit from Takom Of the Krupp Raumer S and the Sd.kfz 617 Minenraumer.

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I haven't done a 1/72 kit in a while and am definitely a little taken aback by the parts size, but I've done smaller. The build starts with the Minenraumer. The main body is just two pieces with most of the build taken up with the vehicles three massive wheels.

  " />

  " />

And all of those pieces build up into these.

  " />

Now I'll let everything dry nice and hard and then begin sanding all of those seams on the wheel pads. This little guy really is going togther quickly and should be ready for paint tomorrow.

Cary

 


GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, October 26, 2023 8:13 PM

Cary,

Looks like a lot of fiddly bits, but it's coming along.  That's the problem with 1/72nd, they go together so quickly.  Big Smile

Good job!

Gary

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:22 AM

Thanks Gary. This baby is going together quicker than I thought. Very few parts on the Raumer S. Here's where I am on that. Painting next.

  " />

Cary

 


  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, October 27, 2023 8:54 PM

Yeah you've got some significant work done there Cary! Yes

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:12 PM

I'm in if it's not too late.  I have this coming next week Cool

 

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:34 PM

Cary,

Good work on the Raumer!  I look forward to seeing them finished.  Smile

Keavdog,

Glad to have you with us!  I have this kit and look forward to seeing your build.

 

As for me, I've finally got some orange paint that should work.  We'll see.

Gary 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:47 PM

The VsKfz 617 Minenräumer

Built in the Alkett factory near Berlin, the VsKfz 617 Minenräumer was heavily armored and designed to detonate mines by simply rolling over them. (VsKfz is short for Versuchs Kraftfahrzeug, meaning “test vehicle.”) The three-wheeled vehicle’s wide track was designed to clear a mine-free path for other vehicles to safely travel. The sole prototype carried the Alkett chassis number of 9537 and was registered as NK-101. Unfortunately, much solid information on this vehicle has been lost to history.

The Alkett VsKfz 617 had two large main power wheels at its front. A smaller, caster-style rear wheel was used for turning. Via power take offs and clutches, turning the steering wheel engaged worm shafts on both sides of the hull. The worm shafts operated in opposite directions—one side drew in a chain while the other slackened a separate chain. The chains extended through the VsKfz 617’s hull and were connected to each side of the rear wheel, rotating it as the driver turned the steering wheel. There is no indication that any differential steering was available.

Each wheel was made up of 10 links and 10 thick, heavy, solid shoes. The pin that connected two links also attached a shoe. Three of the shoes would come together on the ground for each wheel. The total of nine shoes gave the VsKfz 617 ample ground contact. The thick shoes were also resistant to damage from mine blasts. Damaged individual shoes and links could be easily replaced.
The VsKfz 617’s transmission was positioned in middle of the vehicle. A shaft led from each side of the transmission and engaged the gearing for the main wheels.

A Maybach HL-120 V-12 engine was situated transversely behind the transmission. This gasoline engine produced 300 hp (224 kW) from its 4.13 in (105 mm) bore and 4.53 (115 mm) stroke cylinders. Its total displacement was 729 cu in (11.9 L). Two radiators were positioned behind the engine. Cooling air was brought in from ducts on the upper middle of the VsKfz 617 and expelled through vents on its upper rear. A 190 gallon (720 L) fuel tank was positioned above the rear wheel.

The VsKfz 617’s hull had about 39 in (1 m) of ground clearance that helped protect the crew from mine detonations. Furthermore, the bottom of the vehicle’s hull consisted of 1.58 in (40 mm) thick armor plating, with an additional 0.79 in (20 mm) of armor sheeting inside—creating a double hull. The rest of the vehicle’s hull thickness varied from 0.39 to 1.58 in (10 to 40 mm).

For defensive armament, the VsKfz 617 prototype had a Panzer I turret with two 7.92 mm MG 34 machine guns. However, the production version would have a Panzer II turret with a single 20 mm KwK 30 L/55 cannon and one MG 34 machine gun. The driver occupied the left side of the vehicle and saw out via a small slit in the upper armor. A rear wheel position indicator was just in front of the driver’s view. The vehicle’s commander was on the right, operating the turret. The VsKfz 617 was 20.6 ft (6.28 m) long, 10.6 ft (3.22 m) wide, and 9.5 ft (2.90 m) tall. It weighed 55 tons (50 tonne).

Testing of the VsKfz 617 started as soon as it was completed in 1942. It was quickly found that the VsKfz 617’s method for steering was unsatisfactory and that the vehicle was slow and hard to handle. To make matters worse, its immense weight caused the vehicle to easily get bogged down. The VsKfz 617 and plans for its manufacture were abandoned after the tests.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:59 PM

Must have been an exciting rider for the driver!

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, October 28, 2023 11:20 AM

keavdog

Must have been an exciting rider for the driver!

 
I can imagine! Especially if the area was heavily mined!
 
I've managed to get a coat of primer on, which was Mr. Surfacer 1000.  It revealed a few places that needs more sanding.  I'll do that and maybe it will be ready for paint.
 
 
Gary

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Saturday, October 28, 2023 5:39 PM

Gary-the X-1 has come together nicely-gonna look great in orange.

Cary-very interesting subject-never knew such a vehicle existed. Your's is coming along nicely-parts too tiny for me though.

John-great to see an X-15 in the mix.  I kinda remember building one in my youth.  Looking forward to watching your build.

Bob

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Monday, October 30, 2023 5:12 PM

It's here!

 

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, October 30, 2023 5:59 PM

John,

That's great!  Look forward to seeing what you do with it.

 

As for me, I've once again chosen the wrong color, which seems strange as I use Tamiya TS12, which to me appears to be the RIGHT color, but it appears too dark, almost "burnt orange".  In this photo, it looks lighter, but its definately darker than it looks.

I wonder if I had used a white primer instead of the grey it would have made a difference?

Well, nothing to do now but give it a light sanding and try again.  I've have to find a different orange.  I'm trying to match this, as it appeared when testing.

Gary

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, October 30, 2023 8:07 PM

John: Ohhhhh that looks cool! 

Gary: Hmmm, I'd think the colour would change depending on the lighting conditions. And it would probably fade badly in the hot SW desert sun. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, October 31, 2023 9:40 PM

Gamera

Gary: Hmmm, I'd think the colour would change depending on the lighting conditions. And it would probably fade badly in the hot SW desert sun. 

True, and pictures have a way of lying about colors, so tonal quality can be subjective.  Still, I'll try for a lighter color than what I have.  Awaiting a new paint.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, October 31, 2023 9:44 PM

     

The X-15

The North American X-15 rocket-powered research aircraft bridged the gap between manned flight within the atmosphere and manned flight beyond the atmosphere into space. After completing its initial test flights in 1959, the X-15 became the first winged aircraft to attain velocities of Mach 4, 5, and 6 (four, five, and six times the speed of sound). Because of its high-speed capability, the X-15 had to be designed to withstand aerodynamic temperatures on the order of 1,200 degrees F.; as a result, the aircraft was fabricated using a special high-strength nickel alloy named Inconel X.

Air-launched from a modified Boeing B-52 Stratofortress aircraft, the X-15 required conventional aerodynamic control surfaces to operate within the atmosphere and special "thruster" reaction control rockets located in the nose and wings of the aircraft to enable the pilot to maintain control when flying on the fringes of space. Indeed, the X-15 design was so much like that of a space vehicle that during the formative days of Project Mercury, America’s first attempt to put a man in orbit, North American and National Air and Space Administration (NASA) engineers gave serious consideration to utilizing a growth version of the X-15 for the manned orbiting mission. This plan was dropped in favor of using a blunt-body reentry vehicle. Because of the potential dangers to the pilot should the X-15’s pressurized cockpit lose its atmosphere while the aircraft operated in a near-space environment, X-15 pilots wore specially developed full-pressure protection ‘spacesuits’ while flying the experimental plane.

Three X-15 research aircraft were built and flown, completing a total of 199 research flights. The National Air and Space Museum has the historic X-15 #1, Air Force serial 56-6670. The X15 #2 (56-6671) was rebuilt following a landing accident as the advanced X-15A-2, having increased propellant capacity and, hence, a higher potential performance. The X-15A-2 was the fastest X-15 flown, and it is now on exhibit at the Air Force Museum, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The X-15 #3 (56-6672) featured an advanced cockpit display panel and a special adaptive control system. The aircraft made many noteworthy flights until it crashed during atmospheric reentry, following pilot disorientation and a control-system failure. The pilot, Capt. Michael Adams, was killed.

The X-15 flew faster and higher than any other airplane. A peak altitude of 354,200 feet (67± miles) was reached by the X-15, and the X-15A-2 attained a speed of Mach 6.72 (4,534 mph) while testing a new ablative thermal protection material and a proposed design for a hypersonic ramjet. Various proposals were set forth for modifying the aircraft to accomplish new and even more radical tasks. At one point, NASA scientists planned to test a hydrogen-fueled supersonic combustion ramjet engine mounted on the X-15s lower vertical fin. A mock-up of this proposed installation was flight-tested on the X-15A-2. Other ideas included modifying the X-15 with a slender delta wing and using the aircraft as a booster for small satellite launch vehicles. None of these ideas, however, came to fruition.

The X-15 spearheaded research in a variety of areas: hypersonic aerodynamics, winged reentry from space. life-support systems for spacecraft, aerodynamic heating and heat transfer research, and earth sciences experiments. A total of 700 technical documents were produced, equivalent to the output of a typical 4,000-man federal research center for more than two years.

Development of the X-15 began in 1954, in a joint research program sponsored by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (forerunner of NASA), the U.S. Air Force. the U.S. Navy, and private industry. North American was selected as prime contractor on the project following a competition in which Douglas. Republic. and Bell also participated. By the time of its first airborne test, flight research was too complex to rely on simple air-to-ground communications near a test field. The Air Force and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics developed a special 485-mile-long test corridor stretching from Wendover Air Force Base. Utah. to Edwards Air Force Base. California. It was planned that the X15 would be air-launched from a Boeing B-52 near Wendover. then fly down this corridor, the High Range. to Edwards. monitored by tracking stations at Ely and Beatty. Nevada. and at Edwards. The range lay along a series of flat dry lakes. where the X-15 could make an emergency landing. if necessary. Nothing this extensive had previously existed in flight research, and it foreshadowed the worldwide tracking network developed by American manned spacecraft ventures. The X-15 would complete its research mission and then. followed by special Lockheed F-104 chase aircraft. would land on the hard clay of Rogers (formerly Muroc) Dry Lake. Because the X-15 featured a cruciform tail surface arrangement. it was necessary for the designers to make the lower half of the ventral fin jettisonable prior to landing so that the conventional two-wheel, nose-landing gear and two tail-mounted landing skids could support the aircraft.

 

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, November 4, 2023 1:01 PM

After giving the X-1 a good sanding, I've sprayed it with white primer preparing it for a coating of orange.  I hope this will help achieve the proper color.

Meanwhile, I've started on my next model for this build, a Revell D-558-2 Sky Rocket.  Very crude with lots of flash, but I hope to turn it into something reasonable (after I sand off the raised decal placements).

And I even have the "Master Modelers Club Application"!  I wonder what would happen if I sent it in?  Big Smile

Now let's say something about paint.  I visited Hobby Lobby yesterday, hoping to find some orange paint of the correct tone.  I found an orange that would probably work, a hobby spray paint of the 3 oz. size for $8.79.  Bit expensive for such a small can.

Then I decided to try the craft section, and there I found a color that closely matches the hobby spray paint, but it was 12 oz. for $5.99!  Guess which one I bought?

Now I don't know about pricing for paint, but this seems a bit over the top.  Does mixing different tonal qualities for paint really cost that much more?  Guess we'll find out when I try this cheaper paint.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, November 6, 2023 9:23 PM

The Krylon spray paint "Pumpkin Orange" seems to be closer to the correct color for the Bell X-1 (IMO).  The only problem is that this paint is a glossy color and takes a while to dry.

I'll give it a week and see how she's doing.  Meanwhile, I'll work on the Sky Rocket.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, November 6, 2023 9:35 PM

D-558-1 Sky Streak

On March 15, 1944, while Allied forces prepared for the invasion of Normandy in Europe and the assault on the Marianas in the Pacific, Army Air Forces and Navy officers looked to the future in a meeting at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics’ (NACA) Langley Laboratory. The subject was high-speed flight and by the end of the year a plan was in place for the development of research aircraft, with the Navy focusing on subsonic flight and the Army Air Forces (later U.S. Air Force) tasked with pushing beyond the sound barrier.

The specifications for the Navy aircraft called for it to be a pure research design, capable of taking off and landing on its own power using existing engines. It also had to be able to carry 500 lb. of instruments to records data from the test flights.

In developing their company’s proposal, Douglas Aircraft Company engineers designed a straight-wing airplane with a cylindrical fuselage to house the engine, which was the 5,000 lb. static thrust Allison J35-A-11. One unique aspect of the design was the escape system for the pilot. In the event of an emergency, the nose detached from the fuselage and when it reached a safe speed, the pilot would perform a bailout through the detached end of the nose section.

With Douglas test pilot Eugene F. May at the controls, the D-558-1 Skystreak made its maiden flight at Muroc Army Air Field (later Edwards Air Force Base) on April 15, 1947. Landing gear problems revealed themselves on early test flights, but by August the airplane was ready for high-speed flights. Improving its aerodynamic qualities was a streamlined canopy replacing the original bubble canopy design.

On August 20, 1947, Commander Turner F. Caldwell took off in the first D-558-1 (Bureau Number 37970) on an attempt to top the speed record of 623.738 M.P.H. established a month earlier by Army Air Forces Colonel Albert Boyd in a P-80R Shooting Star modified for the flight. In four passes over the 3-kilometer course, Caldwell averaged a speed of 640.743 M.P.H., shattering Boyd’s mark. According to newspaper accounts of the era, Caldwell made his turns at the end of his four runs as tightly as possible to conserve fuel, using a black stripe on the ground and two clouds of green smoke marking the beginning and end of the 3-kilometer distance. His altitude was 75 feet. It marked the first time the Navy held the world speed record since Lieutenant Al Williams attained 266.59 M.P.H. in 1923.

Caldwell could rest on his laurels for just five days. On August 25, 1947, wearing the traditional cloth flight helmet because the height of a hard hat would preclude his tall frame from fitting in the cockpit, Marine Lieutenant Colonel Marion Carl climbed into the second Skystreak (Bureau Number 37971). Describing the airplane as the “blood-red Douglas Skystreak,” a newspaper article announced “Plane Zooms Ahead of Sun,” in describing Carl’s flight that day, reflecting the fact that with his average speed of 650.6 M.P.H., he would have had to set his watch back a few minutes if flying from Berlin to London. “The ship is a beautiful one to fly, and I had no trouble whatever,” Carl said after completing his four passes, sometimes at just 25 ft. off the ground. “I felt nothing like compressibility or turbulence.”

The aircraft that the press nicknamed “The Crimson Test Tube,” held the mantel of fastest aircraft in the world for just a brief time.  D-558-1 Skystreak research flights continued until June 10, 1953, with NACA test pilots at the controls.

 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Tuesday, November 7, 2023 10:36 AM

Got some painting done. Decided to go with a "what-if" cmoi scheme for the Minenraumer. I havene't decided what I want to do with the Raumer S. I'm leaning towards just leaving it in primer red, but also might go with another oddball camo scheme.

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Cary

 


GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, November 7, 2023 1:09 PM

Nice!  They're both coming along great.  As to camo, I think both would be most covered in mud, especially have gone through a mine field!  Surprise

Maybe a splinter type camo, though the red primer will be good.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, November 7, 2023 7:45 PM

Gary and Cary: Both of those are coming along great!!! 

Going on vacation/holiday next week and I'm going to take the FV4005 and get some work done while I'm sitting the motel room in the evenings. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, November 8, 2023 5:41 AM

Gamera

Gary and Cary: Both of those are coming along great!!! 

Going on vacation/holiday next week and I'm going to take the FV4005 and get some work done while I'm sitting the motel room in the evenings. 

 

 
Thanks! Hope to finish the Bell X-1 soon.
 
Have a safe trip! I'd ask where you're bound, but that's on a need to know basis!  Just hope it's not somewhere in the Middle East!  Big Smile
 
Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, November 8, 2023 7:59 PM

LOL Gary, Virginia Beach! 

I got bumped into by a jellyfish once while wading but that's the most violence I've seen. I'm lucky it hit me with the top part, the float or bell or whatever you call it, instead of the tentacles so I didn't get stung.

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, November 26, 2023 10:52 AM

After a timely break, I'm back at the bench to finish up the Bell X-1.  Decals are on, though the decal for "Glamorous Glennis" tends to disappear at this scale in the orange background.  Still to do is the canopy framing, and may a bit more weathering.

Meanwhile, in the back, the Douglas D-558-2 Sky Rocket is being puttied and ready for sanding.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Sunday, November 26, 2023 3:14 PM

Nice build Gary-nice shade of orange -not too bright and has a desert environment weathered look.

Bob

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, November 26, 2023 7:19 PM

Oh that looks good to me Gary! Nice work! 

 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, November 26, 2023 11:16 PM

Thanks, guys!  I'll try to finish it up this week.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, December 1, 2023 11:02 AM

The Bell X-1's canopy is finished.  I used my normal canopy technique of applying thin strips of decal paper (in this case, thin strips of thin metal foil) over the frame, then painting as required.  Turned out okay.

 

A bit more weathering and she'll be ready to go!

Thanks for looking.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, December 1, 2023 11:07 AM

AVRO 707

The Avro 707 originated as a "proof-of-concept" delta wing aircraft that was principally the work of Stuart D. Davies, Avro's chief designer. It was a relatively compact aircraft that initially incorporated a wing with about 50° sweep, without a horizontal tail on a fin with trailing edge sweep. The trailing edge of this wing carried two pairs of control surfaces: inboard elevators and outboard ailerons. These flight surfaces worked in conjunction with a conventional rudder. Retractable airbrakes were also provided above and below the wings. The aircraft featured all-metal stressed-skin construction. The Avro 707 programme provided valuable insights into the Vulcan's flight characteristics, most of the information coming from the second and third prototypes which flew before the Vulcan.

All Avro 707s were powered by a single Rolls-Royce Derwent centrifugal turbojet engine. The air intake on the first prototype and later 707B was located on the upper rear fuselage. Some aircraft were outfitted with ejection seats. In total, five Avro 707s were completed.

On 4 September 1949, the first Avro 707, VX784, performed its maiden flight from RAF Boscombe Down, Squadron Leader Samuel Eric Esler, DFC, AE, was at the controls. Two days later, it was statically displayed at the Farnborough Airshow. However, testing with the first prototype was cut shortly when, on 30 September 1949, it crashed near Blackbushe during a test flight, killing Esler. The next prototype, VX790, renamed the 707B, had a longer nose, different cockpit canopy, a wing of different (51°) sweep and a longer nose wheel leg to provide the high angle of incidence required by deltas for landing and take off. The Avro 707B was given the same dorsal engine intake as the first prototype, although this was later modified to a NACA design. It first flew on 6 September 1950; the aircraft quickly proved to be relatively docile in flight. Both the 707 and 707B were largely flown to test low speed characteristics.

The final variant was the two-seat 707C; originally four examples were ordered by the RAF with the intention of conducting orientation training for flying aircraft with delta wing configurations using the type. The 707C was provisioned with a wider cockpit to accommodate a "side-by-side" seating arrangement and dual flight controls. However, the production order was cancelled; accordingly, only the sole prototype, WZ744, was built. The 707C had its maiden flight on 1 July 1953 and was ultimately employed in other research that did not involve Vulcan development.

Even after the Vulcan development phase was over, the four surviving 707s, in individual bright blue, red, orange and silver (natural metal) colour schemes, continued in use as research aircraft.

The two-seat 707C joined the R.A.E. in January 1956; perhaps its most substantial research contribution was to the development of fly-by-wire control systems, one of the first of their kind, and fitted with a side stick controller. This aircraft was flying with the R.A.E. until September 1966 when it achieved its full airframe time.

The Avro 707s made numerous public appearances at the Farnborough Airshow throughout the 1950s. During 1952, the first prototype Vulcan flew with the 707s A and B and in 1953, the four surviving Avro 707s flew alongside the first two Avro 698 Vulcan prototypes.

No Avro 707s are presently airworthy. Both examples of the 707A variant survive. One, WZ736, was preserved in Great Britain at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, but has been transferred to the Boscombe Down Aviation Collection at Old Sarum, while the other, WD280, is preserved in Australia at the RAAF Museum at Point Cook, Victoria. Also in Great Britain is WZ744, the single 707C prototype, which was displayed at the RAF Museum, Cosford near Wolverhampton and is currently stored out of public view with its space in the museum's Test Flight hall taken by the British Aerospace EAP.

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, December 6, 2023 11:30 AM

"Put the spurs to her, Chuck!"

The Bell X-1 is finished.  Altogether, she was a simple build.  It was a Tamiya model, so I expect them to fall together without trouble.  The only problem I had with her was the paint, but I'm satisfied with how it turned out.

Thanks for looking!

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Wednesday, December 6, 2023 12:58 PM

Very nice build Gary-really looks the part when on the stand-just waiting for the sonic boom!

Bob

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, December 6, 2023 8:17 PM

Oh that looks superb Gary! Great work!!! 

 

Now I want to pull out my DVD of 'The Right Stuff'... 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, December 6, 2023 9:39 PM

Bob,

Thanks!  No sonic boom, but there's a slight whistling sound...  Wink

I usually do my 1/72nd aircraft in wheels-up configuration, so stands are a must!

**************

Gamera,

You don't need an excuse to watch "The Right Stuff", but it helps!  Big Smile

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, December 8, 2023 12:39 PM

The Douglas D-558-2 Sky Rocket is coming along.  I've manage to putty most of the seams and begin sanding.  It will need a bit more of this before she's ready for primer.

Considering this model is as old as I am, I've had few problems with it.  Painting is usually where I have problems.  Oh, well!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, December 8, 2023 12:43 PM

The Douglas D-558-2 Sky Rocket

The Douglas D-558-II “Skyrockets” were among the early transonic research airplanes like the X-1, X-4, X-5, and X-92A. Three of the single-seat, swept-wing aircraft flew from 1948 to 1956 in a joint program involving the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), with its flight research done at the NACA’s Muroc Flight Test Unit in California.  The Skyrocket made aviation history when it became the first airplane to fly twice the speed of sound.


The II in the aircraft’s designation referred to the fact that the Skyrocket was the phase-two version of what had originally been conceived as a three-phase program, with the phase-one aircraft having straight wings. The third phase, which never came to fruition, would have involved constructing a mock-up of a combat-type aircraft embodying the results from the testing of the phase one and two aircraft.


The D-558-II was first flown on Feb. 4, 1948, by John Martin, a Douglas test pilot. An NACA pilot, Scott Crossfield, became the first person to fly faster than twice the speed of sound when he piloted the D-558-II to its maximum speed of Mach 2.005 (1,291 mph) at 62,000 feet altitude on Nov. 20, 1953. Its peak altitude, 83,235 feet, a record in its day, was reached with Lt. Col. Marion Carl at the controls.


The three aircraft gathered a great deal of data about pitch-up and the coupling of lateral (yaw) and longitudinal (pitch) motions; wing and tail loads, lift, drag, and buffeting characteristics of swept-wing aircraft at transonic and supersonic speeds; and the effects of the rocket exhaust plume on lateral dynamic stability throughout the speed range. (Plume effects were a new experience for aircraft.) The number three aircraft also gathered information about the effects of external stores (bomb shapes, drop tanks) upon the aircraft’s behavior in the transonic region (roughly 0.7 to 1.3 times the speed of sound).


The need for transonic research airplanes grew out of two conditions that existed in the early 1940s. One was the absence of accurate wind tunnel data for the speed range from roughly Mach 0.8 to 1.2. The other was the fact that fighter aircraft like the P-38 “Lightning” were approaching these speeds in dives and breaking apart from the effects of compressibility-increased density and disturbed airflow as the speed approached that of sound, creating shock waves


The Navy contracted with Douglas to design the airplane, and in the course of the design process, the D-558 came to be divided into two separate phases, with phase one being a straight-wing turbojet aircraft and phase two consisting of a swept-wing design with turbojet and rocket propulsion. At the NACA’s suggestion, based on the research of Robert Jones at Langley and captured German documents, Douglas and the Navy had agreed to the swept-wing design, and to provide sufficient power to propel the swept-wing airplane past Mach 1, they also agreed to add rocket propulsion.


The three airplanes flew a total of 313 times-123 by the number one aircraft (Bureau No. 37973-NACA 143), 103 by the second Skyrocket (Bureau No. 37974-NACA 144), and 87 by airplane number three (Bureau No. 37975-NACA 145). Skyrocket 143 flew all but one of its missions as part of the Douglas contractor program to test the airplane’s performance.


NACA 143 is currently in storage at the Planes of Fame Museum, Ontario, CA. The second Skyrocket, NACA 144, is in the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. NACA 145 is on display in front of the Antelope Valley College in Lancaster, CA.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, December 10, 2023 10:55 PM

Very cool Gary! 

I've got the FV2005 mostly assembled by working on it in the evenings while on vacation. Need to get the photos up soon. Probably won't get to painting it till next year though. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, December 12, 2023 9:16 PM

That's dedication, working on it through your vacation.  I eagerly anticipate seeing those photos.  But, I understand it's the Holidays and people have other things on their minds (like what models they'll get from Santa)!  Smile

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, December 13, 2023 9:29 PM

Well, not really dedication. I just need something to do in the evenings while watching TV or YouTube videos on my phone. 

Hopefully I'll have some photos up before too long. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, December 14, 2023 12:27 AM

Great job, Gary, that's a nice orange finish.

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, December 14, 2023 12:32 AM

Since the D-558 II is being posted, here are two of the Revell kits I did 15 or more years ago, though I count them as "not quite" finished.  The one with a flush canopy is how the airplane was for it's first flight but after takeoff visibility was nil over the nose for most of the flight so it was changed to the shape we are used to seeing.

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, December 15, 2023 2:34 AM

Thanks, John!  Those are neat representations of the Sky Rocket, especially the early one!

Well done!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, December 15, 2023 2:57 AM

Krupp Räumer S

One of the most bizarre vehicles created during the Second World War is the Räumer S, a massive 130-ton machine built by the German company Krupp. It is comprised of two separate halves, connected in the centre and able to articulate, each end is powered by its own engine.

 Germany’s rapid re-armament from 1934 onwards focused mainly on ground warfare capabilities, along with a well-equipped air force to support the army on the battlefield. With the rapid acquisition of large numbers of tanks and other armoured fighting vehicles, the German Army command recognised the need for a specialised mechanical mine clearing system with the ability to keep up with armoured spearheads in the field.

In September 1940 the General Army Office (AHA) issued a formal requirement for a heavy mine-clearing vehicle, and on the 16th of that month the Weapons Office ordered a prototype from the Alkett group of companies. Later, the Krupp conglomerate was also invited to respond to the design proposal.

The design concept had strict parameters: the vehicle should be armoured, self-propelled and fitted with rollers that could clear a path three metres wide. It was not to weigh more than 40 tons, and no taller than 2.7 metres, wider than three metres and no longer than 10 metres. The crew had to be totally protected from artillery fragments, small arms fire and naturally, the blast from detonating mines.

Both companies proceeded with their separate design proposals, but experienced repeated and prolonged delays due to problems sourcing some components, and a lack of urgency on part of the government and German Army towards some projects like these. The Alkett design was presented to the general staff in August of 1942, but this prototype, which was known as the VsKfz 617 Minenräumer, was deemed unsatisfactory, and work was suspended on this vehicle by the company.

Krupp showcased their competing design in September 1942, and this prototype was also judged to be unsuitable but enough redeeming features were found for further development to be authorised.

Krupp developed their original proposal into the Räumer S, and this new design was much larger and heavier, but was an innovative blueprint that promised great efficiency if manufactured according to Krupp’s new specifications. The new design plans were forwarded to the Weapons Office in June 1943, and these were approved for prototyping shortly thereafter.

Construction on the prototype proceeded slowly, and further delays occurred when the Krupp factory in Essen was bombed, which necessitated the relocation of the project to a facility near Hillersleben. The project vehicle was shown in an incomplete state to the general staff on the 10th August 1944, and although Krupp promised to have the prototype finished by September, it was not shown to the Weapons Office as completed until November 1944.

With Germany obviously losing the war by 1944, any urgency for the project ceased as it was obvious that no more large-scale mechanised offensives were going to be conducted again by the Wehrmacht, and the prototype never left the Hillersleben facility. It was captured intact by the United States Army in 1945, and taken to Paris for testing.

Due to a lack of records the vehicle fades from history at this point, but one fragment of an American assessment of the Räumer S speculated that the vehicle could also tow a trailer for mine clearing duties, to enhance the total area being cleared of mines.

The Räumer S was an innovative concept, and Krupp were able to finalise a design that fit well within the technical hurdles they were trying to overcome. For crew safety and battlefield mobility a ‘penny-farthing’ concept was used for the vehicle wheels, which were nearly three metres in diameter.

The Räumer S was designed as having two cabins with an axle each, and these segments were joined by a pivoting pin, which swivelled when impelled by hydraulic cylinders.
Each half of the vehicle was equipped with its own power plant, and had a separate driving station that allowed the Räumer S to be driven either forward or in reverse. This was done because the turning circle of the vehicle was overly large, and having two driver stations allowed tactical retreats to be made in relative safety.

The crew consisted of eight personnel, one driver and seven observers/sappers. All crew were seated on sprung seats, and the crew pods had plating to 25 mm in thickness – the high ground clearance of 1.4 metres along with the armour and sprung seats ensured the crew did not suffer any ill-effects from mines detonating in close proximity.

The dimensions of the Räumer S were certainly impressive, and far exceeded the original specifications outlined in the 1940 design proposal. The vehicle had a length of 15.63 metres, a height of 2.93 metres and the different lengths of the two axles (this was done to increase the total of the ground area covered in mine-clearing operations) meant that the Räumer S had a wheel-track width of 3.3 metres.

The total weight of the Räumer S was a staggering 130 tons, and this weight reached the high ground pressures needed for triggering pressure-sensitive mines.

The wheels were 2.7 metres in diameter, and had a width of 530 mm. Each wheel was fitted with massive rubber pads up to 15 centimetres in thickness, and each axle had a very long suspension travel. This was necessary because a wheel could be blown up to half a meter in the air by the blast of a mine, or suddenly drop up to a metre into a mine crater, while still supporting the vehicle body.

The Räumer S was completely unarmed, though the crew had provisions to carry their personal weapons in the vehicle cabins.

The vehicle was fitted with two Maybach HL-90-P-20-K engines, which produced 350 BHP each, with one engine in each of the vehicle’s halves. It was capable of travelling at 15.5 mph (25 km/h) on the road, and operated at 2.5-5 mph (4-8 km/h) when in mine clearing mode.

The German war effort in the Second World War is littered with examples of weapon systems proposals that either never came to fruition, entered service too late to provide a technical advantage over the enemy, or employed in numbers too small to make any appreciable impact on the course of the conflict.

  • Member since
    September 2007
  • From: Finland funland
Posted by Trabi on Sunday, December 17, 2023 1:58 PM

Hi GAF! I would like to join this GB. I just finished "Box art" GB and I try to attend one GB at the time that all my builds would not end to "Get it done!" GB Embarrassed

My kit is ELF Models DFWT28 Floh WW1 fighter prototype.

"Space may be the final frontier, but it´s made in Hollywood basement." RHCP, Californication

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, December 18, 2023 2:15 PM

Welcome, Trabi!  That is a unusual aircraft.  It almost looks like one of the "egg" aircraft put out by Hasegawa!   I'll get you on the list.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, December 18, 2023 7:49 PM

Yeah wow, that's so cool Trabi! I've seen it in books but had no idea anyone made a model of it. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Sunday, December 24, 2023 11:42 AM

Beautiful paint job on the X-1, Gary. The paint might have been the biggest problem but it sure did turn out pretty.

 

Cary

 


  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Sunday, December 24, 2023 11:49 AM

I'm calling these two done. Both were fun little builds. These were massive machines in real life so that even in 1/72, there weren't many tiny parts. Minimal weathering on the Raumer S as it was only ever a prototype. The minenraumer did get a little dirty on a test trip through a minefield or two though.

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Cary

 


  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, December 24, 2023 5:05 PM

Nice job!  Those things are quite beastly, understandable due to there role.

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, December 24, 2023 11:00 PM

Those look superb, Cary!  I'll get you up on the front page ASAP.  Congrats!

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, December 25, 2023 5:02 PM

Yeah those look fantastic Cary! 

Great job on them!!!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, December 25, 2023 5:08 PM

The FV2005 is almost assembled. I put down a few coats of British bronze green a few days ago. I had to paint some of the vehicle before adding stuff like the muffler guards since there's no way to paint behind them after assembly.

 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, December 25, 2023 7:10 PM

Talk about the "broadside of a barn"!  That looks like it belongs on a destroyer instead of a tank!

Looks good!

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, December 25, 2023 9:07 PM

GAF

Talk about the "broadside of a barn"!  That looks like it belongs on a destroyer instead of a tank!

Looks good!

Gary

 

Yeah, no kidding! I hear in World of Tanks their version of the FV2005 is called s**tbarn of doom... Indifferent

There are a few patches in the paint I want to get evened out before I get the painted version up. Hopefully soon. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, December 30, 2023 7:31 AM

DFW T.28 Floh

The DFW T28 Floh (Flea) was an early biplane fighter designed for use by the German Empire. To get an edge over then current monoplane fighters, the T28 was designed with aerodynamics and speed in mind. The result was an aircraft that looked straight out of a cartoon. Despite its appearance, the aircraft performed well during testing, maxing out at 112mph (180 km/h). Although its speed was good, its large body and the placement of the wings reduced visibility for the pilot, making landings with the craft difficult. This was enough for officials to decline production of the type despite its respectable top speed.

In mid 1915, a new head engineer, Dipl-Ing (Engineer) Hermann Dorner was appointed at DFW.   Dorner had speed in mind with his fighter design.  Work began on a prototype of Dorner’s fighter in late 1915 at DFW’s facility in Lubeck-Travemunde.  The construction of the aircraft, now known as the DFW T28 Floh, was supervised by Theo Rockenfeller at the plant. The final T28 looked like it flew straight out of a cartoon, possessing a very tall fuselage with small wings. This proportional difference made the aircraft appear more like a caricature than a combat aircraft of the time period.

Despite its design, the aircraft was still designed for speed, and would have a 100hp (74.5kW) Mercedes D I engine, which was completely enclosed in the fuselage. Armament would be a single machine gun mounted in front of the pilot. The T28 would take flight shortly after its construction, but the exact date is unknown. The design choices of the aircraft to make it fly faster worked well, as it was able to achieve a top speed of 112 mph (180 km/h), which was extremely impressive for the time period. However, its design wasn’t perfect and the choices made to improve speed negatively affected other aspects of the aircraft, in particular, its landing characteristics. The tall profile of the craft, the location of the upper wing, and the placement of the pilot’s position, gave him a superb view above the plane but was severely restricted frontally and below. The prototype Floh would be damaged due to this reason upon landing on its first flight, due to the pilot misjudging his height, as well as having a fast landing speed. This issue also affected takeoff, as the high placement of the pilot required him to stand up during taxiing to see. The design was reworked a few times after its first flight, mainly with improving the tail surfaces.

Despite achieving the speed Dorner wanted, the military officials showed little interest in the design, with some sources citing that it was just too fast for the military. Further work on the aircraft was stopped after this. Exactly what happened to the aircraft after being declined for production is unknown, whether it was simply scrapped or if it was continually used at DFW’s facilities for training and testing are possible theories. Many prototype German aircraft of the First World War would go on to serve as trainers for their various companies once production declined.

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, December 30, 2023 7:34 AM

Work has kinda slowed down due to the holidays and cold weather making it difficult to finish painting.  Weather affecting aircraft!  Who would have thunk? Wink

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, January 4, 2024 1:34 AM

Managed to get a primer coat of Mr. Surfacer 1000 on the D-558-2. After a bit of filling and sanding, she's ready for a first coat.  Then the interior and canopy.

The Bf-109 is a Tamiya F4/7 Tropical I'm finishing up (which has nothing to do with this GB).

Thanks for looking!

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, January 4, 2024 5:02 PM

Looks good Gary! Always good to see something ready for paint. 

 

If they're flying in formation not sure the Bf-109 is going to be able to keep up... 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, January 9, 2024 11:53 AM

I've managed to get the first coat on the D-558-2, though it will need a second coat.  Work on the pit is progressing, and I'll gussy it up a bit before gluing the canopy on.  I'm attempting to make a pilot for the aircraft, though it's very crude (but you'll probably not be able to see much after the hatch is closed.

Weather has been kinda miserable for the first part of January, which has slowed progress.  Maybe it will improve later this week.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, January 11, 2024 12:28 PM

That looks perfect to me. I hate painting white since of course it won't cover anything. Looks dang good to me Gary. Yes

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, January 11, 2024 1:00 PM

I used to hate painting white, I remember building the two Revell D 558 kits many years ago and also a 1/72 Yak UT-1 and putting on about six layers of MM Gloss White and (not) waiting long enough for each coat to dry.  What I do now is use flat white, regardless of the ultimate gloss/matt final finish, and either let a clear gloss overcoat bring up the shine, or just put a final thin layer of gloss white on over the top of the flat white if no clear coat is to be used, sometimes a good thing if there is a concern of the gloss yellowing over time.

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, January 11, 2024 3:09 PM

It helped that the model was in white plastic to start.  Spraying it with Mr. Surfacer 1000 helped even it out (though it was grey).  A few more details and I intend to give it a second coat of flat white paint.  Gloss White I find tends to be more of a mess than I like to deal with.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, January 11, 2024 3:19 PM

Very true! I generally use a couple coats of white primer and then flat white. I ended up stumbling on this though a lot of expermentation. I wish you guys had been around to tell me all this back then! Wink

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, January 12, 2024 8:23 PM

4,520 miles per hour - still holds the record.  The build is under way

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, January 12, 2024 10:26 PM

Nice work, she's coming along great! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, January 12, 2024 11:48 PM

That's neat, John!  Are you going to paint it as the later version with the white coating?

Gary

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, January 13, 2024 9:32 AM

Thanks.  I'm doing her black - wicked looking.  With the silver tanks like this pic but in flight

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Saturday, January 13, 2024 5:35 PM

Gary-the white looks good-funny how white is so hard to get 'right'.

 John-love the X-15...it looks fast sitting still.

The Olds Aerotech is still sitting in the box waiting for me to paint the small parts and do some assembly....hoping to get motived next week since the weather looks like 'stay at home' weather....

Bob

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, January 17, 2024 10:43 AM

Bob,

Thanks!  Things are going slowly.  I managed to put the hatch on today, which means more puttying and sanding.  Then we can worry about the second coat.

You're right about the "stay at home" weather!  Dipped into the single digits last night!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, January 17, 2024 10:53 AM

Nakajima G10N Fugaku (Mount Fuji)

The Nakajima G10N was a planned Japanese ultra-long-range heavy bomber designed during World War II. It was conceived as a method for mounting aerial attacks from Japan against industrial targets along the west coast (e.g., San Francisco) and in the Midwest (e.g., Detroit, Milwaukee, Chicago, and Wichita) and the northeast (e.g., New York City and Norfolk) of the United States. Japan's worsening war situation resulted in the project's cancellation in 1944 and no prototype was ever built.

The Fugaku had its origins in "Project Z (bomber project)", a 1942 Imperial Japanese Army specification for an intercontinental bomber which could take off from the Kuril Islands, bomb the continental United States, then continue onward to land in German-occupied France. Once there, it would be refueled and rearmed and make another return sortie.

Project Z called for three variations on the airframe: heavy bomber, transport (capable of carrying 300 troops), and a gunship armed with forty downward-firing machine guns in the fuselage for intense ground attacks at the rate of 640 rounds per second (i.e. 38,400 rounds per minute).

The project was conceived by Nakajima Aircraft Company head Chikuhei Nakajima. The design had straight wings and contra-rotating four-blade propellers. To save weight, some of the landing gear was to be jettisoned after takeoff (being unnecessary on landing with emptied bomb load), as had been planned on some of the more developed German Amerika Bomber competing designs. It used six engines, as with the later Amerikabomber design competitors, to compensate for nearly all German aircraft engines being limited to 1,500 kW (2,000 hp) maximum output levels apiece.

Development was initiated in January 1943 and a design and manufacturing facility built in Mitaka, Tokyo. Nakajima's 4-row 36-cylinder 5,000 hp Ha-54 (Ha-505) engine was abandoned as too complex.

Project Z was cancelled in July 1944, and the Fugaku was never built.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, January 17, 2024 8:49 PM

keavdog

Thanks.  I'm doing her black - wicked looking.  With the silver tanks like this pic but in flight

 

Very cool. I love that look for the X-15... 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, January 17, 2024 8:56 PM

Gary: Thanks! Still haven't started the kit though... Embarrassed

 

However I did pretty much finish up painting the FV2005 and a bit out of order put the wheels on over the weekend. I looked around the internet and couldn't find any British Centurion tank from the same time period with much of any markings. So it looks like I'm going with simple bronze green here. Painting the tools now, hopefully I'll have them on this weekend and ready to put down another gloss coat for the washes.

Only real problem is the spade on the back of the thing is crooked. I've tried bending and flexing it but it won't stay straight. Instead of ripping it off and trying to re-cement it a little straighter I'm thinking of just mounting the thing to the base with the spade already dug into the earth.

  

 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, January 18, 2024 7:00 AM

The FV2005 is looking good!  Sorry about the spade.  I think whatever you come up with will be okay.  Smile

As to camo, since it was a prototype, I doubt anyone worried about that.  What were British tanks painted in that period?  If you want a "What If" scheme, I'd go with that.

Gary

PS> Being curious, I looked up British camo schemes from the Korean War (being the most likely conflict it would have engaged in).  Not much variation there.  Seems olive drab was the most common.  Maybe you'll have better luck finding something.

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, January 18, 2024 8:02 AM

X-62 / NF-16D

The General Dynamics X-62 VISTA ("Variable Stability In-flight Simulator Test Aircraft") is an experimental aircraft, derived from the F-16D Fighting Falcon, which was modified as a joint venture between General Dynamics and Calspan for use by the United States Air Force (USAF). Originally designated NF-16D, the aircraft was redesignated X-62A on 14 June 2021 as part of an upgrade to a Skyborg, with System for Autonomous Control of Simulation (SACS).

The NF-16D VISTA testbed aircraft incorporated a multi-axis thrust vectoring (MATV) engine nozzle that provides for more active control of the aircraft in a post-stall situation. As a result, the aircraft is super maneuverable, retaining pitch and yaw control at angles of attack beyond which the traditional control surfaces cannot change attitude.

The NF-16D VISTA is a Block 30 F-16D based on the airframe design of the Israeli Air Force version, which incorporates a dorsal fairing running the length of the fuselage aft of the canopy and a heavyweight landing gear derived from the Block 40 F-16C/D. The fairing houses most of the variable-stability equipment and test instrumentation. The heavyweight gear permits simulation of aircraft with higher landing sink rates than a standard F-16.

The program was notable for the development of Direct Voice Input and the "Virtual HUD", which were both eventually to be incorporated into the cockpit design for the F-35 Lightning II.

The VISTA aircraft is now operated by the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School and maintained by Calspan at Edwards Air Force Base. It is regularly used in student curriculum sorties, special academic projects, and flight research. As of 14 June 2021 VISTA is in the midst of upgrading. In addition to replacing the VISTA Simulation System (VSS) with a newer, upgraded version of the same system, a System for Autonomous Control of Simulation (SACS) will be added in order to operate X-62A as a Skyborg. One application is as autonomously piloted aircraft, perhaps as robotic wingman to a manned aircraft.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, January 18, 2024 6:30 PM

Gary: Looks like she's gonna be just plain jane Bronze Green. Yeah, I looked though some Korean War British armour too and it all seems mostly just green. No big deal, I've painted enough US and Soviet/Russian tanks just plain boring green too. 

Cool NF-16D! I kinda wish the USAF had built the F-16XL with the cranked delta wing. The F-16 with the delta wing looks just plain badass. But it seems that despite increasing the range about 50% without any drop tanks it ruined the plane's handling...

 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, January 18, 2024 7:43 PM

I like the F-16XL.  Too bad no one choose it as a model to build.  Sad

As for the X-62A, Hasegawa is releasing a model this month, so I was prompted to include a write up on it.  Some interesting systems being tried out.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, January 25, 2024 10:57 AM

Works been kinda slow on the D-558-2.  I've closed her up and started detailing (what there is).  Weather is holding me up.  Meanwhile, I've been keeping busy on other things (such as an old ESCI / Italeri F-86 E/F) that's also ready for paint. 

I'm ready for winter to be over!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, January 25, 2024 11:01 AM

1956 General Motors Firebird II

The Firebird II was one of a quartet of prototype cars that General Motors (GM) engineered for the 1953, 1956, and 1959 Motorama auto shows. The cars' designers, headed by Harley Earl, took Earl's inspiration from the innovations in fighter aircraft design at the time. General Motors never intended the cars for production, but rather to showcase the extremes in technology and design that the company was able to achieve.

General Motors researched the feasibility of gas turbine engines in cars as early as the 1940s. It was not until the early 1950s that the company began building an actual engine, under the direction of Charles L. McCuen, general manager of General Motors Research Laboratories, with Emmett Conklin leading the project.

As these concept cars were not specifically tied to any one division of GM, the Firebird I, II, and III were adorned with the logo of the General Motors Air Transport Section (GMATS).

The second of the concept cars, the Firebird II of 1956, was designed as a four-seat, family car. It had a low and wide design with two large air intakes at the front, a high bubble canopy top, and a vertical tail fin. Its exterior bodywork is made entirely of titanium. The engine output is 200 hp (150 kW). To solve the exhaust heat problem, the car feeds the exhaust through a regenerative system, allowing the engine to operate nearly 1,000 °F (538 °C) cooler, and also powers the accessories. Capable of using different types of fuel, the most common is Kerosene.

The concept car was also the first use by General Motors of disc brakes on all four wheels, along with a fully independent suspension. It also featured a non-operational guidance system intended for use with "the highway of the future," where an electrical wire embedded in the roadway would send signals that would help guide cars and avoid accidents.

GM preserved the prototype cars at the GM Heritage Center in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Models of the cars are in the permanent collection of the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, and the cars still make regular appearances at car shows.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, January 26, 2024 11:18 PM

Gary: She looks good! 

And I agree, I like winter up to Christmas and then I'm ready for spring... 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, January 28, 2024 10:06 PM

Thanks, Gamera!  Not the most accurate model, however.

Well, the painting is done.  I've applied a coating of Future over her to prepare for decals.  Unfortunately, due to the age of the decals, I wanted to test whether they would stay together while applying.  The first shattered into a thousand pieces while sitting in the water bowl!  I guess that answers my question.

Now, I don't think spraying them with decal bonder would work.  They are just too old.  I've made a copy of them on the scanner, but lately my printer has been producing fuzzy images and I don't know what the problem is, so printing a new set might be out of the question.  I'll try, but don't hold out much hope.

My best bet is to try to source some new decals, lettering and stars and bars.  I've seen some that should work and I may end up ordering some.  Until then, I'll hold off on further work on the D-558-2, at least for a couple of weeks.  We'll see about starting something new.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, January 29, 2024 9:55 AM

The decal printing went better than I had hoped!

I guess I'll let them dry and then give them a coating of decal bonder to help stabilize the ink.  Maybe I'll get the D-558-2 finished sooner than I thought!  Feeling happy now.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, January 29, 2024 10:15 AM

MBT-70 / Kampfpanzer 70

By the early 1960s, with the Cold War now well into its second decade, Western intelligence learned the Soviets were preparing a vastly improved version of their T-62 main battle tank with upgraded armor, three-man crew and an autoloading main gun. The American and West German armies faced exactly the same threat in exactly the same theater of operation. As a result, the American and West German armies both needed a heavy tank that could move fast, fire a very large round and withstand as much as it could dish out.

But at the time, the U.S. defense planners concluded what was needed was a tank so advanced that it would keep us ahead of the Russians for a full generation, not just a couple years. American Defense Secretary Robert McNamara decided to do something no one had ever tried before or since; he got the West Germans to agree to jointly develop this “super-tank” with the United States. The program was to be called the Main Battle Tank 70 or MBT-70.

Today, many weapon systems are developed as part of a cooperative effort by two or more allied countries. But for some reason, nobody ever tries to jointly develop tanks. Nobody really knows why, although the MBT-70 experience might provide a clue.

There was one very good reason to think that the MBT-70 project might work. Initially, both parties saw eye to eye on the new tank’s basic design parameters; a primary one being that it should have a much lower silhouette than the current M60, which was several feet higher than the tallest Russian tank. Instead of having the crew stations inside the hull, as was usually the case, they were being put inside the MBT-70’s oversized turret, which would be protected against nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) threats. This also made it easier to work out the tank’s armor layout, which they agreed should consist of two spaced layers; an outer layer made of thick, hard, cold-rolled steel and an inner layer made of “soft’ steel that would also protect against “spalling,” or interior fragmentation of the armor.

They also agreed to employ an advanced and complex hydro-pneumatic suspension system enabling it to travel cross-country at high speeds, despite its projected fifty-ton weight. The suspension would also be capable of being raised or lowered by the driver so that the tank could “crouch down” to only four inches off the ground when stationary or be raised up to a full twenty-eight inches when running cross-country.

But after that, there were disagreements. They differed on major elements like the main gun and engine, and even whether the design should use metric or SAE measurements. On this latter issue, they ultimately agreed to use both, which did nothing to contain the rising costs of the tank.

Instead of settling on one gun, they decided to both go with what they wanted, again causing the costs to skyrocket. The Germans chose a relatively simple, auto-loading, 120 mm Rheinmetall gun, while the Americans insisted on using the much more complex XM150 auto-loading, stabilized, laser rangefinder-equipped 152mm gun/launcher system, which, besides using an extensive variety of conventional tank rounds, could also fire the Shillelagh anti-tank missile.

The problem was, the American gun/launcher system never really worked. Variants of the system equipped the M551 Sheridan light reconnaissance vehicle and M60A1E2 tanks, but there were problems with the caseless 152 mm gun rounds, the overly complex Shillelagh missile, and the fire control and stabilization system. The extent of the problems with the M60A1E2 was such that most of the turrets were scrapped and the hulls re-equipped with turrets mounting conventional 105 mm cannon.

When the prototypes were built and testing started in 1968, both German and American contingents were pleased with the tank’s mobility. The German 120 mm gun also proved excellent, but the American XM150 continued to be problematic. As testing continued, they realized they had another big problem. Because the driver would be located inside a turret that would be rotating in battle, the tank’s designers had come up with the solution of mounting the driver inside his own contra-rotating cupola within the turret. Regardless of the direction the turret was facing, the cupola would automatically face forward. The drivers, however, accustomed to being located in a stationary position at the front of a tank’s hull, were becoming disoriented and suffering from motion sickness.

In the end, that was just one problem of several. So many leading-edge technologies incorporated into the tank’s design, from the hydro-pneumatic suspension, laser rangefinder, ballistic computer and night vision system to the remotely-operated 20 mm anti-aircraft cannon and the 152 mm gun/launcher, meant there were problems making these new and complex systems work, and costs rose.

They rose to roughly a million dollars a tank, five times the original estimated cost. By 1969, the Germans had pulled out of the program in favor of developing their own Leopard 2. Congress was also fed up.  The Army tried placating them with a lower-cost system based on the same design, the XM803, but what they ended up with was an expensive version of the original M60. Congress cancelled the program at the end of 1971, and the Army plunged the remaining funds into development of what became the M1 Abrams the very next month.

The MBT-70 project was a massive failure, but many of the technologies that emerged from it were later perfected and employed in the M1 Abrams and West Germany’s subsequent Leopard II tank. A variant of the Germans’ 120 mm main gun, for example, equips the M1A1 and M1A2 Abrams today.

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Monday, January 29, 2024 4:46 PM

Gary-nice save on the decals-I need to research and try coping & making decals-I've had one too many explode in the water.

And the Sky Rocket is coming along nicely.

Hope to get back to the Aerotech this weekend.

Bob

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, January 29, 2024 10:20 PM

Thanks, Bob!  Decal printing is not so hard once you get it down.  A good decal paper, and an okay printer makes a world of difference!

Looking forward to seeing the Aerotech!

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, January 31, 2024 10:44 PM

That looks great Gary! Even if not the most accurate she's a fine lookin' model! 

Sucks about the decals but as Bob said nice save on them!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, February 1, 2024 10:33 AM

The decals are on, and while they may not be the best, at least you can read them!  The D-558-2 is approaching completion.  I have some shading to do, maybe some touch-up, and a final coat of finish.  I think I'll try something a bit glossier this time, just to help the decals blend in.

Also, the base is coming along.  I'll give it a stain and then gloss coat it also.  Should look fine.

Gary

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, February 3, 2024 8:59 PM

Finished the X-15 last night.  Fun little project.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, February 4, 2024 8:46 PM

Gary: Love how she looks with the decals on. Great save there! 

John: She looks fantastic! Great work! In the shot from the underside in the second photo if I didn't see the shelf beams I'm swear I were looking at the real thing hanging from the ceiling of a musuem. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, February 5, 2024 10:20 AM

An excellent job on the X-15, John!  You've done her proud!  I'll get her up on the front page.  Congrats!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, February 5, 2024 10:37 AM

She's finished.  The model is not very accurate and the decals may not represent a version of the real thing, but it's done.  I'll live with that.

The stand I put together from a wooden base and some doweling to represent her in flight.

If you look closely, you can just make out a scared pilot!

For such an old model, she went together fairly well.  I did sand off the raised decal outlines, and the decals were toast because of their age, but an enjoyable build.

Thanks for looking!

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 8:44 PM

Gary: I have no idea how accurate she is but she looks beautiful to me. White ain't an easy colour to get right and yet she looks just right. 

 

Kudos sir! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, February 8, 2024 8:52 PM

Any white that doesn't get brown from my dirty fingers looks good to me!  I think it's nice.

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, February 9, 2024 9:26 PM

Thanks, guys!  It was quite interesting working on such an old model.  I have a "Bell X-5" I plan to do.  It's just about as old and will benefit from the work done on the D-558-2.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Saturday, February 10, 2024 1:58 PM

John-love the X-15....it does look like a museum exhibit.

Gary-the D-558-2 came out very nicely.  I picked up a Lindberg X-3 Stiletto I hope to add, time allowing-if so, I'm sure I'll be asking for advice with the white paint.

Bob

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, February 11, 2024 9:51 PM

Bob,

Not much advice on the white paint.  I just suggest a good undercoating with either grey or white primer.

Gary

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Tuesday, February 13, 2024 11:47 AM

Gary!

        You did a nice job there. I would imagine the pilot had to change his  flightsuit after that ride!

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Tuesday, February 13, 2024 11:49 AM

OOOOOOOH!

     Just love these "Go-Fast" Wingy Thingies! Gorgeous!

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, February 13, 2024 8:59 PM

Tanker-Builder> Guess those early pressure suits squeezed more than your blood!  Big Smile

Thanks!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, February 17, 2024 3:12 PM

M247 Sargeant York

The M247 Sergeant York DIVAD (Division Air Defense) was a self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG), developed by Ford Aerospace in the late 1970s. Based on the M48 Patton tank, it replaced the Patton's turret with a new one that featured twin radar-directed Bofors 40 mm rapid-fire guns. The vehicle was named after Sergeant Alvin York, a famous World War I hero.

The Sergeant York was intended to fight alongside the M1 Abrams and M2 Bradley in the U.S. Army, in a role similar to the Soviet ZSU-23-4 and German Flakpanzer Gepard. It would replace the M163 Vulcan Air Defense System SPAAG and MIM-72 Chaparral missile, ad hoc systems of limited performance that had been introduced when the more advanced MIM-46 Mauler missile failed to mature.

At the time, most U.S. military policy was based on the US Air Force quickly gaining air superiority and holding it throughout a conflict. In keeping with this, the Army had previously placed relatively low priority on anti-aircraft weapons. This gave them time to mature through testing and shakedowns. In the case of DIVADs the threat was considered so serious and rapidly developing that the Army decided to skip the traditional development period and try to go straight into production by using a number of "off-the-shelf" parts.

Colonel Russell Parker testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee in March 1977 that "We expect this somewhat unorthodox approach to permit a much reduced development time, thus resulting in an earliest fielding date, albeit with higher but acceptable risks... the manufacturer will be required by the fixed price warranty provisions, to correct deficiencies." It was claimed that this would cut up to five years from the development cycle, although it would require problems to be found in service and fixed on the operational vehicles.

Colonel Parker unveiled the DIVAD plan to 49 industry representatives on 18 May 1977. The DIVAD's requirement demanded that the entrants be based on the M48 Patton tank chassis, provided by the Army, which were held in large quantities in surplus depots. DIVAD called for the gun to acquire a target and start firing within five seconds (later extended to eight) of it becoming visible or coming into its 3,000 m range, and had to have a 50% chance of hitting a target with a 30-round burst. In addition to all-weather capability, it also needed to have optical aiming capabilities, including a FLIR and laser rangefinder.

Several companies responded to the DIVADs contest: Sperry Rand, General Electric, Raytheon, General Dynamic, and Ford Aerospace. On 13 January 1978, General Dynamics and Ford were given development contracts for one prototype each, the XM246 and XM247 respectively, to be delivered to Fort Bliss in June 1980. On schedule, both companies delivered their prototypes to the North McGregor Test Facility and head-to-head testing began. In the DT/OT II test series they shot down two F-86 Sabre fighters, five UH-1 Huey helicopters and twenty-one smaller drones.

After the 29-month Phase One trial, Ford's entry was selected as the winner of the DIVADs contest on 7 May 1981, and given a fixed-price $6.97 billion development and initial production contract for deliveries at various rates. The system was officially named M247 Sergeant York when the contract was awarded. The decision was controversial, as the General Dynamics entry had "outscored" the Ford design consistently in testing, nineteen "kills" to nine by most accounts.

Ford's prototype vehicle started demonstrating problems almost immediately. The main concerns had to do with the tracking radar, which demonstrated considerable problems with ground clutter. In testing, it was unable to distinguish between helicopters and trees. When the guns were pointed upward to fire on high-angle targets, the barrels projected into the radar's line of sight and further confused the system. Additionally, the reaction time was far too slow; against hovering helicopters it was 10 to 11 seconds, but against high-speed targets it was from 11 to 19, far too long to take a shot.

The RAM-D (reliability, availability, maintainability and durability) tests ran from November 1981 to February 1982, demonstrating a wide range of operation concerns.[16] The turret proved to have too slow a traverse to track fast moving targets, and had serious problems operating in cold weather, including numerous hydraulic leaks. The simple electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM) suite could be defeated by only minor jamming. The used guns taken from U.S. Army stock were in twisted condition due to careless warehousing. Perhaps the most surprising problem was that the 30-year-old M48 chassis with the new 20-ton turret meant the vehicle had trouble keeping pace with the newer M1 and M2, the vehicles it was meant to protect.

In February 1982 the prototype was demonstrated for a group of US and British officers at Fort Bliss, along with members of Congress and other VIPs. When the computer was activated, it immediately started aiming the guns at the review stands, causing several minor injuries as members of the group jumped for cover. Technicians worked on the problem, and the system was restarted. This time it started shooting toward the target, but fired into the ground 300 metres (980 ft) in front of the tank. In spite of several attempts to get it working properly, the vehicle never successfully engaged the sample targets. A Ford manager claimed that the problems were due to the vehicle being washed for the demonstration and fouling the electronics. In a report on the test, a reporter jokingly wondered if it ever rained in central Europe.

In February 1984 the Defense Department sent a "cure-notice" censuring Ford Aerospace for numerous "totally unacceptable" delays in the program. In March 1984 the Army took delivery, six months late, of the first production model for testing.

In spite of the bad press and development problems, the Army continued to press for the system's deployment as they had no other system in the pipeline to replace it. To add to the problems, another generation of Soviet helicopter and missile designs was pushing their envelope out to 6,000 metres (6,600 yd), rendering DIVADs ineffective at long range. In response, the Army announced it would consider adding the Stinger missile to the DIVAD system, leading to even more cries about its ineffectiveness.

As Washington became increasingly fed up with the DIVAD's problems, Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger ordered a $54 million series of battlefield-condition tests. Congress authorized production money to keep the program alive through a test-fix-test cycle but with a caveat; the funds would be released only if Weinberger certified that the gun "meets or exceeds the performance specifications of its contract." The tests were monitored by the Pentagon's new Director, Operational Test and Evaluation Office (DOT&E), mandated by Congress in 1983 to serve as an independent watchdog. The tests were carried out late in 1984.

The results were abysmal. When the gun proved unable to hit drones moving even in a straight line, the tests were relaxed to hovering targets. The radar proved unable to lock even to this target, as the return was too small. The testers then started adding radar reflectors to the drone to address this "problem", eventually having to add four. The system now tracked the drone, and after firing a lengthy burst of shells the drone was knocked off target. As it flew out of control, the range safety officer had it destroyed by remote control. This was interpreted by the press as an attempt to "fake" the results, describing it as "sophomoric deceits". From that point on, every test success was written off as faked.

The OT&E concluded that the gun could perform the mission as originally specified, but the tests also showed that the system had considerable reliability problems, many as the result of trying to adapt a radar system developed for aircraft to the ground role.

On 27 August 1985, Weinberger killed the project after about 50 vehicles had been produced. He said, "the tests demonstrated that while there are marginal improvements that can be made in the York gun, they are not worth the additional cost-so we will not invest any more funds in the system."

Most of the production Sergeants York ended up as targets on air force bombing ranges. However, one is on display at the Sgt. Alvin C. York State Historic Park in Pall Mall, TN where its namesake hailed from, one is in the Wahner E. Brooks Historical Exhibit at the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Grounds, AZ, another is located at the AAF Museum in Danville, VA, one at the Fort Snelling Military Museum in Minneapolis, MN (now closed), and one located at the Arkansas National Guard Museum at Camp Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Saturday, February 17, 2024 11:05 PM

Shades of the Fisher XP-75!

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, February 18, 2024 2:18 AM

The most expensive Range Targets!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, March 6, 2024 4:29 PM

It's been a month since anybody posted anything.  Any progress?  I'm still trying to clear my desk, but with the weather, rebuilding computers, and general lack of funds, it's slow going!  Hope to get to the G8N1 before too long.

Gary

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, March 6, 2024 5:43 PM

I think I'm in for another :)

Just found this pretty cheap on ebay

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, March 6, 2024 5:54 PM

Very good, John!  That X-3 is as old a model kit as the Revell D-558-2!  Considering the work you did on the X-15, I look forward to seeing what you do with it.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, March 6, 2024 6:01 PM

North American XB-70A Valkyrie

The futuristic XB-70A was originally conceived in the 1950s as a high-altitude, nuclear strike bomber that could fly at Mach 3 (three times the speed of sound) -- any potential enemy would have been unable to defend against such a bomber.

By the early 1960s, however, new Surface-to-Air Missiles (SAMs) threatened the survivability of high-speed, high-altitude bombers. Less costly, nuclear-armed ICBMs (Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles) were also entering service. As a result, in 1961, the expensive B-70 bomber program was canceled before any Valkyries had been completed or flown.

In the mid-1950s, the USAF wanted a radically advanced new bomber that could fly much faster (Mach 3+ or 2,000 mph) and higher (70,000+ feet) than the B-52 it would replace.  The revolutionary B-70 design promised to meet this demanding requirement.  It would be expensive, however, and its survival could not be guaranteed against future Soviet defenses.  In 1961—before a prototype was built—the B-70 bomber program was canceled.

Although the bomber program was canceled, the USAF ordered two XB-70As (AV-1 and AV-2) as pure test aircraft.  Between 1964-1969, they carried out 129 flights, generating valuable data and knowledge regarding large supersonic aircraft.

The Museum’s XB-70A (AV-1) was the first one built and also the first Valkyrie to fly at Mach 3 (about 2,000 mph).  After this flight, however, it was limited to Mach 2.5 due to structural concerns.  The second XB-70A (AV-2) flew multiple times at Mach 3, including a sustained, 32-minute, Mach 3 flight in May 1966.  Valkyrie AV-2 was lost in June 1966 after an F-104 collided with it in mid-air.  F-104 pilot Joe Walker (NASA) and XB-70A copilot Maj Carl Cross (USAF) died.  North American pilot Al White ejected from the XB-70A, but was badly injured.

Paint flaked off XB-70 AV-1 during its early flights.  North American solved the problem by repainting AV-1 with a thinner coat.

The first XB-70A (AV-1) was completed in May 1964, and the second XB-70A (AV-2) rolled out of its Palmdale, CA, factory in May 1965. 

       
Only seven pilots flew the Valkyrie:
-Al White (North American Chief Test Pilot)
-Col Joe Cotton (USAF)
-Lt Col Fitzhugh “Fitz” Fulton (USAF/NASA)
-Van Shepard (North American)
-Maj Carl Cross (USAF)
-Don Mallick (NASA)
-Lt Col Emil “Ted” Sturmthal (USAF)

The US government encouraged supersonic airliner progress with the National Supersonic Transport program.  NASA used XB-70A AV-1 as its primary aircraft to investigate SST operations.  In 1971, the American SST program was canceled, in part due to the problem of sonic booms on the ground—sonic booms are loud, explosive noises caused by aircraft flying faster than the speed of sound.

The XB-70A was later installed at Wright-Patterson Museum of the USAF.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, March 7, 2024 7:45 PM

keavdog

I think I'm in for another :)

Just found this pretty cheap on ebay

 

Oh that's so cool! 

 

And yeah I'm still in this. Having some issues with the tow cables and tools on the FV205. The instructions have them blocking each other when applied. I might just leave some of the tools off.  

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, March 14, 2024 11:38 PM

John, your X-15 came out really nice.  Not always easy with the kind of black on that machine.  I built that X-3 as a flea, you probably did too.

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, March 14, 2024 11:52 PM

I have a report on the D558-1.  Work started a couple of days ago, so here is where it is at.  The instrument panel is a plastic/film/pe sandwich, the yoke on the control pedestal is a nice little pe bow tie.  Once the fuselage is closed up they will never be seen again.  There was some pe for the seat belts but I used Tamiya tape, it's just easier for me in 1/72.   This airplane's general look reminds me of the Italian half jet, the Caproni Campini CC-1, just a big long tube.  I shoved and hauled and believe or not all those interior pieces fit inside. It called for 6 grams of weight under the cockpit and I stuffed as much liquid gravity in there as I could and I think it will not be a tail sitter.  Had to squeeze pretty hard on the fuselage to get that part together. The next speed bump came when I started fitting the wing. SH tells you to glue a wheel well center section on to the lower wing, and then fit that to the fuselage. Perhaps they even intended that the upper wings should be added to the lower before putting it all up to the fuselage. Right away things did not look good for the lower wing fitting up high enough to fair to the fuselage, so I ripped the resin insert off the wing and tried fitting just that to the fuselage. I had to do some grinding on the inside edges of the fuselage, and also deepen the notches where the insert fit into the fuselage. All was well in the end, but the upper wings just barely cover the deeper notches in the fuselage. Fit is pretty good everywhere now. Since I took these photos I taped off the seams and put some Mr Surfacer to work on them.

http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/d558/2d558/0012d558.jpg

 

 

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, March 15, 2024 4:23 PM

Good work on the Skystreak!  I understand about the interior details. Although I made an instrument panel and added a pilot in the Skyrocket, they're practically invisible unless you really get up close!

Gary

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, March 16, 2024 5:57 PM

It's here!

 

 

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, March 17, 2024 8:22 PM

That's excellent, Keavdog!  Does this one come with a seated pilot figure?

Gary

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, March 17, 2024 8:46 PM

Yes - and he's looking out the port window.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, March 18, 2024 8:50 PM

Jeaton: She looks great! Love the look of the cherry red flaming tube of fire! Like a screaming fire-cracker!!! 

Keavdog: Glad to see you got her! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Saturday, March 23, 2024 10:01 PM

Thanks, Cliff.  Here's the current state.  Landing gear is next.

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, March 24, 2024 3:55 PM

Looks great, John!  What color did you use?

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, March 25, 2024 7:58 PM

That looks great John!!! 

Even more like a fire-cracker!!! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Monday, March 25, 2024 10:27 PM

Thanks, Cliff and Gary.  I used Gunze Red Madder for the color, it looked good to me and I had it in the drawer.

This one is a wrap.  All the main gear doors are photoetch on this one, and they are rather weird on the real thing, with one door covering most of the gear well and standing way out from the gear strut. Very delicate! The decals were thin and liked to break, I had to find alternates for the insignia on the fuselage as the kit decals were hopeless. A good coat of Future covered all sins. It really wasn't a very large airplane as you can see in the last photo with a Mustang and D-7.

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, March 26, 2024 5:55 PM

That's spectacular, John!  That red really stands out!  Congrats!

I'll get you up on the front page ASAP.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Tuesday, March 26, 2024 6:36 PM

Nice build John-love the red!

Bob

 

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Thursday, March 28, 2024 1:45 PM

Back at it-spent some time masking for the metallic grey for the lower body work-a red pin stripe decal goes above it so the front will be the more challenging task-a clear coat of Tamiya Clear Gloss after tape to hopefully prevent any paint seepage-noticed some 'dirt pimples' (as we called them in the automotive sheet metal stamping sector) that I attempted to polish out but went a bit too far and will require another coat of silver before clear coat....anyway, hopefully I can paint the grey tomorrow.

It appears that the good folks at Imgur have made some changes on posting formats, so I'll be researching for a bit....grrrrrr

Edit-looks like the folks at Imgur do give the option of using the prior format-thankful for that.....anyway, here's the Aerotech before trim work.  Gonna try to get the engine and suspension wraped up next week...

 

Bob

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, March 28, 2024 9:10 PM

Thanks, Gary and Bob.  Looks like you are getting pretty close, Bob.  I hate dirt pimples but they are certainly attracted to my paint jobs!

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, March 29, 2024 6:59 AM

Nice, Bob!  Off to the paint booth!  The "dirt pimples" will sand out.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, March 29, 2024 7:05 AM

Douglas X-3

The Douglas X-3 Stiletto was the sleekest of the early experimental aircraft, but its research accomplishments were not those originally planned. It was originally intended for advanced Mach 2 turbojet propulsion testing, but it fell largely into the category of configuration explorers, as it never met its original performance goals due to inadequate engines. The goal of the aircraft was ambitious—it was to take off from the ground under its own power, climb to high altitude, maintain a sustained cruise speed of Mach 2, then land under its own power. The aircraft was also to test the feasibility of low-aspect-ratio wings, and the large-scale use of titanium in aircraft structures.

Construction of a pair of X-3s was approved on 30 June 1949. During development, the X-3's planned Westinghouse J46 engines were unable to meet the thrust, size and weight requirements, so lower-thrust Westinghouse J34 turbojets were substituted, producing only 4,900 pounds-force (22 kilonewtons) of thrust with afterburner rather than the planned 7,000 lbf (31 kN). The first aircraft was built and delivered to Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 11 September 1952.

The X-3 featured an unusual slender, streamlined shape having a very long, gently-tapered nose and small trapezoidal wings. The aim was to create the thinnest and most slender shape possible in order to achieve low drag at supersonic speeds. The extended nose was to allow for the provision of test equipment while the semi-buried cockpit and windscreen were designed to alleviate the effects of "thermal thicket" conditions. The low aspect ratio, unswept wings were designed for high speed and later the Lockheed design team used data from the X-3 tests for the similar F-104 Starfighter wing design. Due to both engine and airframe problems, the partially completed second aircraft was cancelled, and its components were used for spare parts.

With the completion of the contractor test program in December 1953, the X-3 was delivered to the United States Air Force. The poor performance of the X-3 meant only an abbreviated program would be made, to gain experience with low aspect ratio wings. Lieutenant Colonel Frank Everest and Major Chuck Yeager each made three flights. Although flown by Air Force pilots, these were counted as NACA flights. With the last flight by Yeager in July 1954, NACA made plans for a limited series of research flights with the X-3. The initial flights looked at longitudinal stability and control, wing and tail loads, and pressure distribution.

NACA pilot Joseph A. Walker made his pilot checkout flight in the X-3 on 23 August 1954, then conducted eight research flights in September and October. By late October, the research program was expanded to include lateral and directional stability tests. In these tests, the X-3 was abruptly rolled at transonic and supersonic speeds, with the rudder kept centered. Despite its shortcomings, the X-3 was ideal for these tests. The mass of its engines, fuel and structure was concentrated in its long, narrow fuselage, while its wings were short and stubby. As a result, the X-3 was "loaded" along its fuselage, rather than its wings. This was typical of the fighter aircraft then in development or testing.

These tests would lead to the X-3's most significant flight, and the near-loss of the aircraft. On 27 October 1954, Walker made an abrupt left roll at Mach 0.92 and an altitude of 30,000 feet (9,100 metres). The X-3 rolled as expected, but also pitched up 20° and yawed 16°. The aircraft gyrated for five seconds before Walker was able to get it back under control. He then set up for the next test point. Walker put the X-3 into a dive, accelerating to Mach 1.154 at 32,356 ft (9,862 m), where he made an abrupt left roll. The aircraft pitched down and recorded an acceleration of -6.7 g (-66 m/s²), then pitched upwards to +7 g (69 m/s²). At the same time, the X-3 side-slipped, resulting in a loading of 2 g (20 m/s²). Walker managed to bring the X-3 under control and successfully landed.

The post-flight examination showed that the fuselage had been subjected to its maximum load limit. Had the acceleration been higher, the aircraft could have broken up. Walker and the X-3 had experienced "roll inertia coupling," in which a maneuver in one axis will cause an uncommanded maneuver in one or two others. At the same time, several North American F-100 Super Sabres were involved in similar incidents. A research program was started by NACA to understand the problem and find solutions.

For the X-3, the roll coupling flight was the high point of its history. The aircraft was grounded for nearly a year after the flight, and never again explored its roll stability and control boundaries. Walker made another ten flights between 20 September 1955 and the last on 23 May 1956. The aircraft was subsequently retired to the National Museum of the United States Air Force.

Although the X-3 never met its intention of providing aerodynamic data in Mach 2 cruise, its short service was of value. It showed the dangers of roll inertia coupling, and provided early flight test data on the phenomenon. Its small, highly loaded unswept wing was used in the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter, and it was one of the first aircraft to use titanium. Finally, the X-3's very high takeoff and landing speeds required improvements in tire technology.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, March 29, 2024 8:26 PM

John: Whoa! She looks fantastic! Great job!!! Heart

Bob: Great to see her coming along! I always get the same 'dirt pimple' or dust or something in all my finishes. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Monday, April 8, 2024 4:32 PM

Making some progress on the Aerotech-got the dark metallic grey painted-not perfect but close enough

The front end was a bigger concern with the curvature-not sure if the decal will match but if not, I can live without the red stripe

The upper cowling will fit snugger so the seam should be minimal-it does show on the real vehicle.

Drivers seat attached

Indycar bodywork is attached to the Aerotech body, engine is maybe 85% complete-hope to have the ignition wiring & rest of the engine & chasis complete tomorrow (maybe)

Most flaws will be hidden by the body....Whistling

Gary-thanks for posting the info for the Douglas X-3 Stiletto-I've added the Lindberg kit to my stash, along with some other X-Files types for future GB's....or maybe this one if I get on a streak....

Bob

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, April 8, 2024 11:03 PM

Bob: That looks perfect to me! Love how the finish came out. Heart

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, April 10, 2024 12:17 AM

Excellent work, Bob.  She'll be a beauty once finished!

Gary

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