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The X-Files Group Build

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GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, October 22, 2023 6:56 AM

Bob,

Sounds like a plan.  I hope Jeaton has something for you.  Big Smile

Gamera,

The complicated track system is why I stay away from armor!  Good luck!

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, October 22, 2023 7:20 AM

The FV4005 "Doombarn"

The development of the L4 started in 1950, and was aimed at increasing the firepower of the ‘Heavy Gun Tanks’. This was a uniquely British designation that was not governed by tank weight, but the size of the gun. A requirement was formulated for a tank armed with a gun capable of defeating a 60-degree sloped plate, 6 inches (152 mm) thick, at up to 2,000 yards (1,830 meters), a feat impossible even for the powerful 120 mm L1 gun of the FV214 Conqueror. By 1950, Major General Stuart B. Rawlins, Director General of Artillery (D.G. of A.) had concluded that there was no gun available with that level of ballistic performance and an investigation was launched. Initially, the British Military looked at the development of a 155 mm gun that would be standardized with the USA. However, even this lacked the required punch and, as such, 6.5 and 7.2 inch (165 and 183 mm respectively) High-Explosive Squash Head (HESH) shells were looked at.

It was not until December 1952 that the designation of the gun was officially updated to 183 mm. The design of the gun was accepted and was serialized as the ‘Ordnance, Quick-Firing, 183 mm, Tank, L4 Gun’. In reality, only the HESH shell underwent further development and the number of charges was dropped to one. The 183 mm L4 became one of the largest and most powerful tank guns in the world.

The design of the vehicle would be held in limbo, ready to go into production if necessary. This stopgap vehicle would be based on the Centurion of the FV4000 series, with the original turret removed. The vehicle would go through two ‘Stages’ or ‘Schemes’. ‘Stage 1’ was built to test the gun and its mount on the Centurion chassis. The ‘Stage 2’ was a finalized design and would be the production standard. The vehicle was given the designation of ‘Heavy Anti-Tank, SP, No. 1’ – ‘SP’ standing for ‘Self-Propelled’. Officially, the FV4005 was never given the traditional British ‘C’ name such as the FV4101 Charioteer and FV4004 Conway before it.

In total three prototypes were ordered – a single Stage 1, and two Stage 2s. The FV4005 would fill the role of a ‘Heavy Gun Tank’. As such, the vehicle would engage targets from long-range, firing over the heads of attacking lighter tanks.

The Centurion was chosen as the basis for this vehicle and three Mk.3 hulls were removed from service for the prototype development. Other than the removal of the turret and various small additions, the hull would remain mostly unaltered. Armor on the hull remained the same thickness, with about 3 inches (76 mm) at roughly 60 degrees on the front slope. A 650 hp Rolls-Royce Meteor petrol engine, located at the rear of the vehicle, propelled the tank. The Centurion used a Horstmann style suspension, with 3 bogies per side carrying 2 wheels each. The drive sprocket was at the rear with the idler at the front. The driver was located at the front right of the hull.

The Stage 2 was built closest to what a production version of the FV4005 would consist of. As such, a number of changes were made between the two Stages. The biggest change was the design and construction of a fully enclosed turret to the form of little more than a large box. The loading assist for the loader was also deleted, and the concentric recoil system was replaced by a hydropneumatic type.

The turret was welded and fabricated from ½ inch (14 mm) thick steel and was there to protect the crew from small arms fire and shell splinters. As this was intended to be a second line vehicle that would keep out of the range of enemy AFVs, the FV4005 did not need really thick armor. There were two hatches on the roof and one large door on the rear. The roof hatches were two-piece and, in front of them, were two single periscopes installed in the turret roof.

Like the Stage 1, the Stage 2 featured a recoil spade installed at the rear of the vehicle. However, on the Stage 2, a hand-cranked winch was installed on the rear of the vehicle to lower the spade.

Despite the general success of the project, the FV4005 suffered much the same fate as the FV215. The feared Soviet heavy tanks, like the IS-3, which these vehicles were designed to defeat, were not being made in the massive numbers expected, indicating a shift in policy to lighter, more maneuverable, and more lightly armored tanks. The need for ‘Heavy Gun Tanks’ like the Conqueror, FV215 and the FV4005 stand-in, from this perspective, was simply becoming absent. Other changes were also taking place as technology-wise, larger caliber guns with their huge ammunition were becoming obsolete by improved anti-armor performance of smaller guns and by the appearance of a new generation of accurate Anti-Tank Guided Missiles (ATGM).

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, October 22, 2023 9:09 PM

Thanks Gary! Guess I should have posted that but I'm lazy.... Sleep

 

I love the British, they don't do anything halfway! The whole thing is so batguano over-the-top you have to love it. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, October 23, 2023 4:05 PM

Gamera,

I'm going to post information on lots of X-craft, so it's not necessary for people to post information about their builds.  Big Smile

To build a tank destroyer you think they might have built one like the Stug or SU-100.  The turret with such a large gun reminds me of the Tiger in "Kelly's Heroes" being unable to turn.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, October 23, 2023 6:34 PM

Yeah, the turret is like the one on the US Army's M-18 Super Hellcat where they replaced the normal 76mm gun with a 90mm. The commander was given strict orders never to fire the gun with the turret turned more than 30 degrees from centreline since they were worried the recoil would flip the whole TD on it's side or upside down. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, October 24, 2023 5:03 PM

There's some minor filling and sanding left to do, but she's about ready for paint.  I'll see if I can give her a coating of primer tomorrow.

Overall, this is an enjoyable build.  The wheel covers fit snugly, so there was minor filll required.  The only fill that's really required is the part at the rear of the canopy.  Don't know why they didn't make it part of the main fuselage or canopy instead of a separate piece.  Oh, well!

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, October 25, 2023 6:32 PM

Looks good Gary! Looking forward to seeing the cool orange on there! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Thursday, October 26, 2023 1:18 PM

I'm going to go ahead a get started. This a 1/72 combo kit from Takom Of the Krupp Raumer S and the Sd.kfz 617 Minenraumer.

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I haven't done a 1/72 kit in a while and am definitely a little taken aback by the parts size, but I've done smaller. The build starts with the Minenraumer. The main body is just two pieces with most of the build taken up with the vehicles three massive wheels.

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And all of those pieces build up into these.

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Now I'll let everything dry nice and hard and then begin sanding all of those seams on the wheel pads. This little guy really is going togther quickly and should be ready for paint tomorrow.

Cary

 


GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, October 26, 2023 8:13 PM

Cary,

Looks like a lot of fiddly bits, but it's coming along.  That's the problem with 1/72nd, they go together so quickly.  Big Smile

Good job!

Gary

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:22 AM

Thanks Gary. This baby is going together quicker than I thought. Very few parts on the Raumer S. Here's where I am on that. Painting next.

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Cary

 


  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, October 27, 2023 8:54 PM

Yeah you've got some significant work done there Cary! Yes

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:12 PM

I'm in if it's not too late.  I have this coming next week Cool

 

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:34 PM

Cary,

Good work on the Raumer!  I look forward to seeing them finished.  Smile

Keavdog,

Glad to have you with us!  I have this kit and look forward to seeing your build.

 

As for me, I've finally got some orange paint that should work.  We'll see.

Gary 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:47 PM

The VsKfz 617 Minenräumer

Built in the Alkett factory near Berlin, the VsKfz 617 Minenräumer was heavily armored and designed to detonate mines by simply rolling over them. (VsKfz is short for Versuchs Kraftfahrzeug, meaning “test vehicle.”) The three-wheeled vehicle’s wide track was designed to clear a mine-free path for other vehicles to safely travel. The sole prototype carried the Alkett chassis number of 9537 and was registered as NK-101. Unfortunately, much solid information on this vehicle has been lost to history.

The Alkett VsKfz 617 had two large main power wheels at its front. A smaller, caster-style rear wheel was used for turning. Via power take offs and clutches, turning the steering wheel engaged worm shafts on both sides of the hull. The worm shafts operated in opposite directions—one side drew in a chain while the other slackened a separate chain. The chains extended through the VsKfz 617’s hull and were connected to each side of the rear wheel, rotating it as the driver turned the steering wheel. There is no indication that any differential steering was available.

Each wheel was made up of 10 links and 10 thick, heavy, solid shoes. The pin that connected two links also attached a shoe. Three of the shoes would come together on the ground for each wheel. The total of nine shoes gave the VsKfz 617 ample ground contact. The thick shoes were also resistant to damage from mine blasts. Damaged individual shoes and links could be easily replaced.
The VsKfz 617’s transmission was positioned in middle of the vehicle. A shaft led from each side of the transmission and engaged the gearing for the main wheels.

A Maybach HL-120 V-12 engine was situated transversely behind the transmission. This gasoline engine produced 300 hp (224 kW) from its 4.13 in (105 mm) bore and 4.53 (115 mm) stroke cylinders. Its total displacement was 729 cu in (11.9 L). Two radiators were positioned behind the engine. Cooling air was brought in from ducts on the upper middle of the VsKfz 617 and expelled through vents on its upper rear. A 190 gallon (720 L) fuel tank was positioned above the rear wheel.

The VsKfz 617’s hull had about 39 in (1 m) of ground clearance that helped protect the crew from mine detonations. Furthermore, the bottom of the vehicle’s hull consisted of 1.58 in (40 mm) thick armor plating, with an additional 0.79 in (20 mm) of armor sheeting inside—creating a double hull. The rest of the vehicle’s hull thickness varied from 0.39 to 1.58 in (10 to 40 mm).

For defensive armament, the VsKfz 617 prototype had a Panzer I turret with two 7.92 mm MG 34 machine guns. However, the production version would have a Panzer II turret with a single 20 mm KwK 30 L/55 cannon and one MG 34 machine gun. The driver occupied the left side of the vehicle and saw out via a small slit in the upper armor. A rear wheel position indicator was just in front of the driver’s view. The vehicle’s commander was on the right, operating the turret. The VsKfz 617 was 20.6 ft (6.28 m) long, 10.6 ft (3.22 m) wide, and 9.5 ft (2.90 m) tall. It weighed 55 tons (50 tonne).

Testing of the VsKfz 617 started as soon as it was completed in 1942. It was quickly found that the VsKfz 617’s method for steering was unsatisfactory and that the vehicle was slow and hard to handle. To make matters worse, its immense weight caused the vehicle to easily get bogged down. The VsKfz 617 and plans for its manufacture were abandoned after the tests.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, October 27, 2023 9:59 PM

Must have been an exciting rider for the driver!

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, October 28, 2023 11:20 AM

keavdog

Must have been an exciting rider for the driver!

 
I can imagine! Especially if the area was heavily mined!
 
I've managed to get a coat of primer on, which was Mr. Surfacer 1000.  It revealed a few places that needs more sanding.  I'll do that and maybe it will be ready for paint.
 
 
Gary

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN area
Posted by bobbaily on Saturday, October 28, 2023 5:39 PM

Gary-the X-1 has come together nicely-gonna look great in orange.

Cary-very interesting subject-never knew such a vehicle existed. Your's is coming along nicely-parts too tiny for me though.

John-great to see an X-15 in the mix.  I kinda remember building one in my youth.  Looking forward to watching your build.

Bob

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Monday, October 30, 2023 5:12 PM

It's here!

 

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, October 30, 2023 5:59 PM

John,

That's great!  Look forward to seeing what you do with it.

 

As for me, I've once again chosen the wrong color, which seems strange as I use Tamiya TS12, which to me appears to be the RIGHT color, but it appears too dark, almost "burnt orange".  In this photo, it looks lighter, but its definately darker than it looks.

I wonder if I had used a white primer instead of the grey it would have made a difference?

Well, nothing to do now but give it a light sanding and try again.  I've have to find a different orange.  I'm trying to match this, as it appeared when testing.

Gary

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, October 30, 2023 8:07 PM

John: Ohhhhh that looks cool! 

Gary: Hmmm, I'd think the colour would change depending on the lighting conditions. And it would probably fade badly in the hot SW desert sun. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, October 31, 2023 9:40 PM

Gamera

Gary: Hmmm, I'd think the colour would change depending on the lighting conditions. And it would probably fade badly in the hot SW desert sun. 

True, and pictures have a way of lying about colors, so tonal quality can be subjective.  Still, I'll try for a lighter color than what I have.  Awaiting a new paint.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, October 31, 2023 9:44 PM

     

The X-15

The North American X-15 rocket-powered research aircraft bridged the gap between manned flight within the atmosphere and manned flight beyond the atmosphere into space. After completing its initial test flights in 1959, the X-15 became the first winged aircraft to attain velocities of Mach 4, 5, and 6 (four, five, and six times the speed of sound). Because of its high-speed capability, the X-15 had to be designed to withstand aerodynamic temperatures on the order of 1,200 degrees F.; as a result, the aircraft was fabricated using a special high-strength nickel alloy named Inconel X.

Air-launched from a modified Boeing B-52 Stratofortress aircraft, the X-15 required conventional aerodynamic control surfaces to operate within the atmosphere and special "thruster" reaction control rockets located in the nose and wings of the aircraft to enable the pilot to maintain control when flying on the fringes of space. Indeed, the X-15 design was so much like that of a space vehicle that during the formative days of Project Mercury, America’s first attempt to put a man in orbit, North American and National Air and Space Administration (NASA) engineers gave serious consideration to utilizing a growth version of the X-15 for the manned orbiting mission. This plan was dropped in favor of using a blunt-body reentry vehicle. Because of the potential dangers to the pilot should the X-15’s pressurized cockpit lose its atmosphere while the aircraft operated in a near-space environment, X-15 pilots wore specially developed full-pressure protection ‘spacesuits’ while flying the experimental plane.

Three X-15 research aircraft were built and flown, completing a total of 199 research flights. The National Air and Space Museum has the historic X-15 #1, Air Force serial 56-6670. The X15 #2 (56-6671) was rebuilt following a landing accident as the advanced X-15A-2, having increased propellant capacity and, hence, a higher potential performance. The X-15A-2 was the fastest X-15 flown, and it is now on exhibit at the Air Force Museum, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The X-15 #3 (56-6672) featured an advanced cockpit display panel and a special adaptive control system. The aircraft made many noteworthy flights until it crashed during atmospheric reentry, following pilot disorientation and a control-system failure. The pilot, Capt. Michael Adams, was killed.

The X-15 flew faster and higher than any other airplane. A peak altitude of 354,200 feet (67± miles) was reached by the X-15, and the X-15A-2 attained a speed of Mach 6.72 (4,534 mph) while testing a new ablative thermal protection material and a proposed design for a hypersonic ramjet. Various proposals were set forth for modifying the aircraft to accomplish new and even more radical tasks. At one point, NASA scientists planned to test a hydrogen-fueled supersonic combustion ramjet engine mounted on the X-15s lower vertical fin. A mock-up of this proposed installation was flight-tested on the X-15A-2. Other ideas included modifying the X-15 with a slender delta wing and using the aircraft as a booster for small satellite launch vehicles. None of these ideas, however, came to fruition.

The X-15 spearheaded research in a variety of areas: hypersonic aerodynamics, winged reentry from space. life-support systems for spacecraft, aerodynamic heating and heat transfer research, and earth sciences experiments. A total of 700 technical documents were produced, equivalent to the output of a typical 4,000-man federal research center for more than two years.

Development of the X-15 began in 1954, in a joint research program sponsored by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (forerunner of NASA), the U.S. Air Force. the U.S. Navy, and private industry. North American was selected as prime contractor on the project following a competition in which Douglas. Republic. and Bell also participated. By the time of its first airborne test, flight research was too complex to rely on simple air-to-ground communications near a test field. The Air Force and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics developed a special 485-mile-long test corridor stretching from Wendover Air Force Base. Utah. to Edwards Air Force Base. California. It was planned that the X15 would be air-launched from a Boeing B-52 near Wendover. then fly down this corridor, the High Range. to Edwards. monitored by tracking stations at Ely and Beatty. Nevada. and at Edwards. The range lay along a series of flat dry lakes. where the X-15 could make an emergency landing. if necessary. Nothing this extensive had previously existed in flight research, and it foreshadowed the worldwide tracking network developed by American manned spacecraft ventures. The X-15 would complete its research mission and then. followed by special Lockheed F-104 chase aircraft. would land on the hard clay of Rogers (formerly Muroc) Dry Lake. Because the X-15 featured a cruciform tail surface arrangement. it was necessary for the designers to make the lower half of the ventral fin jettisonable prior to landing so that the conventional two-wheel, nose-landing gear and two tail-mounted landing skids could support the aircraft.

 

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, November 4, 2023 1:01 PM

After giving the X-1 a good sanding, I've sprayed it with white primer preparing it for a coating of orange.  I hope this will help achieve the proper color.

Meanwhile, I've started on my next model for this build, a Revell D-558-2 Sky Rocket.  Very crude with lots of flash, but I hope to turn it into something reasonable (after I sand off the raised decal placements).

And I even have the "Master Modelers Club Application"!  I wonder what would happen if I sent it in?  Big Smile

Now let's say something about paint.  I visited Hobby Lobby yesterday, hoping to find some orange paint of the correct tone.  I found an orange that would probably work, a hobby spray paint of the 3 oz. size for $8.79.  Bit expensive for such a small can.

Then I decided to try the craft section, and there I found a color that closely matches the hobby spray paint, but it was 12 oz. for $5.99!  Guess which one I bought?

Now I don't know about pricing for paint, but this seems a bit over the top.  Does mixing different tonal qualities for paint really cost that much more?  Guess we'll find out when I try this cheaper paint.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, November 6, 2023 9:23 PM

The Krylon spray paint "Pumpkin Orange" seems to be closer to the correct color for the Bell X-1 (IMO).  The only problem is that this paint is a glossy color and takes a while to dry.

I'll give it a week and see how she's doing.  Meanwhile, I'll work on the Sky Rocket.

Gary

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, November 6, 2023 9:35 PM

D-558-1 Sky Streak

On March 15, 1944, while Allied forces prepared for the invasion of Normandy in Europe and the assault on the Marianas in the Pacific, Army Air Forces and Navy officers looked to the future in a meeting at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics’ (NACA) Langley Laboratory. The subject was high-speed flight and by the end of the year a plan was in place for the development of research aircraft, with the Navy focusing on subsonic flight and the Army Air Forces (later U.S. Air Force) tasked with pushing beyond the sound barrier.

The specifications for the Navy aircraft called for it to be a pure research design, capable of taking off and landing on its own power using existing engines. It also had to be able to carry 500 lb. of instruments to records data from the test flights.

In developing their company’s proposal, Douglas Aircraft Company engineers designed a straight-wing airplane with a cylindrical fuselage to house the engine, which was the 5,000 lb. static thrust Allison J35-A-11. One unique aspect of the design was the escape system for the pilot. In the event of an emergency, the nose detached from the fuselage and when it reached a safe speed, the pilot would perform a bailout through the detached end of the nose section.

With Douglas test pilot Eugene F. May at the controls, the D-558-1 Skystreak made its maiden flight at Muroc Army Air Field (later Edwards Air Force Base) on April 15, 1947. Landing gear problems revealed themselves on early test flights, but by August the airplane was ready for high-speed flights. Improving its aerodynamic qualities was a streamlined canopy replacing the original bubble canopy design.

On August 20, 1947, Commander Turner F. Caldwell took off in the first D-558-1 (Bureau Number 37970) on an attempt to top the speed record of 623.738 M.P.H. established a month earlier by Army Air Forces Colonel Albert Boyd in a P-80R Shooting Star modified for the flight. In four passes over the 3-kilometer course, Caldwell averaged a speed of 640.743 M.P.H., shattering Boyd’s mark. According to newspaper accounts of the era, Caldwell made his turns at the end of his four runs as tightly as possible to conserve fuel, using a black stripe on the ground and two clouds of green smoke marking the beginning and end of the 3-kilometer distance. His altitude was 75 feet. It marked the first time the Navy held the world speed record since Lieutenant Al Williams attained 266.59 M.P.H. in 1923.

Caldwell could rest on his laurels for just five days. On August 25, 1947, wearing the traditional cloth flight helmet because the height of a hard hat would preclude his tall frame from fitting in the cockpit, Marine Lieutenant Colonel Marion Carl climbed into the second Skystreak (Bureau Number 37971). Describing the airplane as the “blood-red Douglas Skystreak,” a newspaper article announced “Plane Zooms Ahead of Sun,” in describing Carl’s flight that day, reflecting the fact that with his average speed of 650.6 M.P.H., he would have had to set his watch back a few minutes if flying from Berlin to London. “The ship is a beautiful one to fly, and I had no trouble whatever,” Carl said after completing his four passes, sometimes at just 25 ft. off the ground. “I felt nothing like compressibility or turbulence.”

The aircraft that the press nicknamed “The Crimson Test Tube,” held the mantel of fastest aircraft in the world for just a brief time.  D-558-1 Skystreak research flights continued until June 10, 1953, with NACA test pilots at the controls.

 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Forest Hill, Maryland
Posted by cwalker3 on Tuesday, November 7, 2023 10:36 AM

Got some painting done. Decided to go with a "what-if" cmoi scheme for the Minenraumer. I havene't decided what I want to do with the Raumer S. I'm leaning towards just leaving it in primer red, but also might go with another oddball camo scheme.

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Cary

 


GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Tuesday, November 7, 2023 1:09 PM

Nice!  They're both coming along great.  As to camo, I think both would be most covered in mud, especially have gone through a mine field!  Surprise

Maybe a splinter type camo, though the red primer will be good.

Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, November 7, 2023 7:45 PM

Gary and Cary: Both of those are coming along great!!! 

Going on vacation/holiday next week and I'm going to take the FV4005 and get some work done while I'm sitting the motel room in the evenings. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, November 8, 2023 5:41 AM

Gamera

Gary and Cary: Both of those are coming along great!!! 

Going on vacation/holiday next week and I'm going to take the FV4005 and get some work done while I'm sitting the motel room in the evenings. 

 

 
Thanks! Hope to finish the Bell X-1 soon.
 
Have a safe trip! I'd ask where you're bound, but that's on a need to know basis!  Just hope it's not somewhere in the Middle East!  Big Smile
 
Gary

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, November 8, 2023 7:59 PM

LOL Gary, Virginia Beach! 

I got bumped into by a jellyfish once while wading but that's the most violence I've seen. I'm lucky it hit me with the top part, the float or bell or whatever you call it, instead of the tentacles so I didn't get stung.

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

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