SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Reale De France

13132 views
119 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Saturday, March 2, 2019 5:52 PM

Thank you gentlemen. I really dreaded this phase, but the starboard outter railing (for lack of proper nautical terms) is installed, pictured here is the seam and looks ok.

This overall shot looks fine, but the rib where the two meet does have a rise to it, cr eating a slight crown and after much sanding, while far from perfect looks ok.

 

 

Started adding the ring bolts to the hatches.

 

Michael D.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2013
Posted by steve5 on Saturday, March 2, 2019 5:56 PM

very nice michael . the close-up shot's of the wood effect's , are awesome .

 

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: brisbane australia
Posted by surfsup on Sunday, March 3, 2019 3:54 AM

She is certainly coming alive now Michael. Lovely work.....Cheers mark

If i was your wife, i'd poison your tea! If Iwas your husband, I would drink it! WINSTON CHURCHILL

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Wednesday, March 6, 2019 10:11 PM

Thanks for the kind comments Steve and Mark, they are much appreciated!. I finished up the port side outer beams, once secured in place I removed a pin to facilitate sanding the joint, spot painted the area, redid the gold leaf, sealed it with flat clear and reinstalled the pin.

Gluing up the narrow deck to the underside of the ribs.

 

Michael D.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May 2017
  • From: Asheville, NC
Posted by LIVIT on Thursday, March 7, 2019 8:37 AM

Looking fantastic Michael. I have one of these in my going to build someday stash. 

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Thursday, March 7, 2019 9:37 AM

Thank you Dale!, this kit and others had been laying around far too long, came down to a coin toss between this and the Cutty Sark.

 

Michael D.

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Saturday, March 9, 2019 11:43 AM

Started the super structure in the stern area. I slightly modified the decks which really didn'nt require much work, but the side rails are a different story, as the photos illustrate about a good 90min each to ready them for gold leafing.

 

Michael D.

 

  • Member since
    May 2017
  • From: Asheville, NC
Posted by LIVIT on Sunday, March 10, 2019 4:20 PM

Beautiful ! It always amazed me how gawdy, yet beautiful, some of those of ships were. How the heck did they have the time to keep up with salt corrosion etc. Being a Navy vet and growing up around commercial fishing in FL, I have seen first hand how fast salt can start corroding and this was on treated metal surfaces. What did they use to keep this corrosion under control back then ?

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: brisbane australia
Posted by surfsup on Sunday, March 10, 2019 8:57 PM

Beautiful work especailly the Wood Grain Texture you have achieved.....Cheers Mark

If i was your wife, i'd poison your tea! If Iwas your husband, I would drink it! WINSTON CHURCHILL

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Monday, March 11, 2019 10:03 AM

You bring up a good point Dale, maybe the way iron was reduced back then and less corrosive compounds in the air helped? along with repeated painting? . Bronze I'm sure wasn't much of an issue except for tarnishing and probably not neglected enough for corrosion to develop and gold/guilding was far more maintenance free.

Thanks for comments guys and Mark I find 80 grit sand paper leaves about the right texture for wood grain.

 

Michael D.

  • Member since
    December 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Monday, March 11, 2019 10:45 PM

As others have mentioned - a beautiful paint job thus far.

And, coming from someone whose patience seems to be waining, your meticulous persistence is to be envyed.

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    December 2006
  • From: Jerome, Idaho, U.S.A.
Posted by crackers on Monday, March 11, 2019 11:51 PM

LIVIT asks, how did galleys avoid salt corrosion and marine growth on the hull ? Perhaps, like the ancient Greeks, when the galley was not in use, it was stored in special sheds like the modern replica of the Greek galley OLYMPIAS. Shed storage also had the advantage of better maintenance to the craft.

Happy modeling   Crackers   Confused

Anthony V. Santos

  • Member since
    May 2017
  • From: Asheville, NC
Posted by LIVIT on Tuesday, March 12, 2019 3:32 PM

Wow, how cool ! I did not know about them usng storage sheds, Tks :)  Another reason I have always enjoyed this forum, the wealth of shared knowledge, comradery and willingness to help each other is the best I have ever experienced on any forum. 

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: brisbane australia
Posted by surfsup on Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:32 AM

Some Museums build the Hall around their Display. Here is a rebuilt Galley from Barcelona......Cheers mark

 

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=barcelona+maritime+museum+galley&tbm=isch&source=hp&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7pffc0YHhAhXW7HMBHRzTD6gQsAR6BAgAEAE

If i was your wife, i'd poison your tea! If Iwas your husband, I would drink it! WINSTON CHURCHILL

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Thursday, March 14, 2019 9:00 AM

Here's a link to an interesting article by Vincent de Paul and the Galleys of France.

https://via.library.depaul.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1476&context=vhj

Surprisingly they spent three quarters of the year ashore which would account for minimal corrosion.

 

Michael D.

  • Member since
    May 2017
  • From: Asheville, NC
Posted by LIVIT on Thursday, March 14, 2019 2:31 PM

Very cool guys, I saved both of those links. Will be great reference sources for my Reale build. All this makes me want to set aside my Consititution again and start on my La Reale. I might get me some gold leaf and work on the hull, when I get burnt out on doing rigging on the Connie.

If you were to build the La Reale again, would you still use the gold leaf or paint ?

  • Member since
    December 2006
  • From: Jerome, Idaho, U.S.A.
Posted by crackers on Thursday, March 14, 2019 3:10 PM

If one has deep pockets----gold leaf. If one is poor as a church mouse---gold paint.

Happy modeling   Crackers    Stick out tongue

Anthony V. Santos

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Thursday, March 14, 2019 3:13 PM

At this point I'd say yes, but I only have testors model master gold to compare it to, I know there's guilding paint that might be a bit more brighter?. I'll show a side by side of what I have in my next post.

 

Michael D.

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Saturday, March 16, 2019 12:40 AM

The stern canopy structure is starting to take shape, I noticed during dry fitting it looked unfinished underneath so I added some styrene sheet to fill the gap and looks much more finished. The last picture shows the gold leaf next to model masters gold, a striking difference to say the least.

 

Michael D.

 

  • Member since
    July 2013
Posted by steve5 on Saturday, March 16, 2019 3:35 AM

what blue are you using mate it's amazing , I have never tried gold leaf , how difficult is it ,

 

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Sunday, March 17, 2019 8:29 AM

Hi Steve,

I used Tamiya XF-8 blue followed by a black wash then dulcoat. The gold leafing isn't too difficult, just more time consuming and does not like to be handled much even after sealing so some touch is required.

A small update regarding the canopy roof structure, instead of gluing it directly to the rails and possibly fouling up the paint work, I decided I will pin it in place with CA glue, still a few more left to do before attaching it.

Michael D.

 

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 7:06 PM

The stern area is starting to take shape, I implemented some Tuscan red as it compliments the royal blue a bit better than a bright red.

 

Michael D.

 

  • Member since
    December 2006
  • From: Jerome, Idaho, U.S.A.
Posted by crackers on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 10:50 PM

Wow ! Really looks great. Waiting for the final results.

Happy modeling      Crackers    Smile

Anthony V. Santos

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Wednesday, March 20, 2019 10:02 PM

Thank you Anthony. I added a few more decorations, I'm certain that horn will suffer some abuse before she's completed.

 

Michael D.

 

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Thursday, March 21, 2019 10:34 PM

I added a few more figures and for the lantern I tried to simulate stained blue glass by using a white base followed by a blue wash then a black wash and a gloss coat. I also added a base to the lantern, all in all looks ok. 

 

Michael D.

 

  • Member since
    May 2017
  • From: Asheville, NC
Posted by LIVIT on Friday, March 22, 2019 3:50 PM

Michael, you are certainly taking your build to another level. Well beyond what I would be able to, due to shakey arthritic hands etc... yours is beautiful. Think I may sell my kit to someone who can do it more justice than me. Dale

  • Member since
    July 2013
Posted by steve5 on Friday, March 22, 2019 3:59 PM

michael , love what you did with lantern , not only are you a very talented modeler , but your imagination is incerdible . your making me want to go out and buy this kit . but I would only copy what you did Embarrassed

 

  • Member since
    July 2006
Posted by Michael D. on Sunday, March 24, 2019 11:55 AM

Thank you for the compliments , Dale I wouldn't sell that kit, I've seen the incredible work you're doing on the Connie, no doubt you can turn into a masterpiece. Steve I think we all can say we've taken ideas from others and applied them into our builds.

I did some modifications to this deck, I added a few hatches and without getting too involved with actually cutting them out and fabricating the hatches themselves, I cheated and simply scribbed them in, I also used .030'x.060" styrene to add a facsia to the break of the deck.

 

Michael D.

 

  • Member since
    May 2017
  • From: Asheville, NC
Posted by LIVIT on Sunday, March 24, 2019 12:13 PM

steve5

michael , love what you did with lantern , not only are you a very talented modeler , but your imagination is incerdible . your making me want to go out and buy this kit . but I would only copy what you did Embarrassed

 

Steve, I totally agree. I would do the same. 

Mike, tks for compliment, means a lot to me bud. That Connie has been a true labor of love, but I still do not feel it is up too the level your doing on this build. Really appreciate you telling us what colors your using and what size styrene strips etc... Big help to all.

 

  • Member since
    December 2006
  • From: Jerome, Idaho, U.S.A.
Posted by crackers on Sunday, March 24, 2019 1:25 PM

Really fabulous work on your galley project. I will follow the entire thread until completion.

Your project perhaps brings to life the misery of a person who had the misfortune of being a galley rower, as this French 17th century illustrartion conveys to us. Some were volunteers, while most were chained prisoners of war, or convicted convicts. It was a death sentence for many. The rower was exposed all kinds of weather conditions, forced to such relieve themselves where they sat and ate substandard food.

One such prisoner of war rower was Pieter Pieterzoon Hein, affectionately know as Piet Hein and still regarded as a hero in his native Holland. He spent four miserable years as a rower on a Spanish galley. He managed to escape and eventually made Commander of the Dutch West India Company to organise the capture of the Great Gallion out of Havana, Cuba with immense treasure. Spain paid dearly for its treatment of the galley slave Piet Hein.

Keep up the good work   Happy modeling

Crackers  Smile     

  

 

Anthony V. Santos

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.