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I ran into some trouble while spraying enamel with airbrush.

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  • Member since
    February 2016
I ran into some trouble while spraying enamel with airbrush.
Posted by JonBailey on Sunday, April 10, 2022 11:45 AM

  I was shooting my truck hood and some bits of contamination blew out onto the hood like chunks of solid paint pigment. I have a habit of keeping my paint/lacquer thinner mix stored in an airtight jar. Crusty paint tends to build up under the lid and on the cork seal. I haven't been using any water separator of filter with my air compressor lately. 

1. Will I need to wet sand my enameled hood when full cured and shoot again or should the hood be stripped completely down to plastic again as with brake fluid?

2. Should I invest in a power paint stirrer for my little jars instead of just shaking the jar for a minute before a shoot? 

3. Should my airbrush, jars, siphon spouts, lids, gaskets and accessories be cleaned thoroughly in solvent each and every spray session? I have dedicated an extra mason jar for soaking painting tools in for cleaning. 

4. Should I always use my water separator in the air line? Is there an inline filter for compressors to keep dust and other contaminates out of the air stream? 

 5. Should I always transfer unused paint/thinner solution to a clean jar, led and gasket after each and every painting session? 

 

Current Model Worked On; 1/25 AMT Kenworth W-925 Tractor Kit, Future Models; 1/25 AMT Wilson Cattle Trailer, 1/96 Atlantis Boeing 727, 1/48 AMT Bell 205 Helicopter

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Sunday, April 10, 2022 1:17 PM

If you spray at too great a distance, it is possible for particles to dry before they hit the surface, or use too much air, you can get this kind of effect.  Usually sanding with wet or dry sandpaper, 600 or 1000 grit, you can just sand it down until smooth and repaint.

When you said paint/lacquer thinner, which were you using.  They are not the same thing.  Using lacquer with enamel gives you quicker drying and the risk of a dry coat.  When you go for a recoat, try putting it on wetter.

 

  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by JonBailey on Sunday, April 10, 2022 6:07 PM

missileman2000

 

I am using lacquer thinner to thin the enamel paint. I spray at the same distance as I always have.

 

 

Since making this thread here, I have gotten some input from another modeling site (name not disclosed here) about this matter as follows:

 

One Respondant said to me there: I wouldn't premix the paint/thinner if at all possible.  Sometimes you absolutely have to, when you do that it should definitely be stored in a bottle with a previously unused cap.  Even then, I'd strain it before spraying it.

Cleaning the airbrush is a must too.  Disassemble if at all possible, otherwise spray thinner or cleaner through it until it sprays clean, with no color in the spray.  

Cleanliness is the main thing.  Shoot for "perfect", most of the time you come up a bit short but still very good. 

 

Another responder said:  Strain you paint through a disposable filter too.

 

Yet another responder said: Also, I'm not sure what equipment you are using, but I always take my spray gun apart after every use. I use a Procon PS-290 which is an internal mix gun, so I have to. One other thing I do is cover the bottle opening with Press and Seal and put the cap on without the factory seal. I use a power stirrer too. I mix paint and thinners in small plastic cups.

 

 

I responded: Paache H airbrush, single action, came as kit

Paasche 1 oz jars, lids, cork gaskets, siphon lids

Kleen-Strip lacquer thinner

Testors 1/4 oz. jar enamels

Dewalt 1 gallon air compressor without any filtration in air line

Paasche airbrush cleaning kit

mason jars for clean-up with thinner

paint booth station 

 

Another person there said: Add some pipettes to your order, then you won't pour the paint over the crusty edge of the bottle. I buy them by the 100 count from Amazon, last I knew they were around$6- $8 per 100. Then transfer your paint to a mixing jar or your H jar when ready to paint. Thin,stir, spray. If your paint bottle is new you can dump it right into your spray jar. I tend not to store pre thinned paint for more than the length of the project I'm working on. If you do that though, mark the bottle in some way so you know it's pre thinned later on or has some thinner in it so you can more carefully inspect it and treat accordingly. On model cars/trucks for instance there is nothing quite like freshly mixed paint from a known clean source .

Or decanted enamel. The H sprays decanted enamels imo, better than from the can. Especially if it's non hobby paint. I decant Rustoleum 2X if I find the color I want you get 12oz for $5ish. Decant, add a touch more lacquer thinner and it comes out every bit as nice as Testors bottle paints. Paasche H #3 needle 

 

Yet another person said: Yeah, get some 3 ml pipettes.

Lots of folks spray at different pressures. I shoot everything at 20 psi, adjusted with the airbrush valve opened. That's usually about 22 psi closed. I get too much orange peel at higher pressures. But, that's just my preference. I've got a Paasche H that I use on non-body parts and for primer on bodies. #1 tips for touch up work and #3 for everything else. I scribe a mark on each of the tips as a reference point to open the valve/tip the same amount each time. Usually 1 1/2 to 2 rotations. I use my PS-290 for the color coats on the bodies. 

 

I said: I have just ordered:

 

* VCT MINI INLINE AIR HOSE COMPRESSOR WATER OIL FILTER DRYER (filters dust, oil and moisture)

* Badger Air-Brush Co. 121 Paint Mixer, White, battery-operated paint stirrer

* Ram-Pro 50 Pack of Paint Strainers with 190 Micron Paint Filter, Fine Nylon Mesh Paint Filter Strainer - Premium Grade Paint Strainers Paper Cone Painting Projects

 

I'm so sick of these botched paint shoots. I need to get serious now!!!  Amazon.com had everything I needed.  

 

 

 

PS- I was an American army soldier, once younger and thinner. I am beginning to realize a model builder must take good care of his painting equipment like a soldier takes care of his rifle. I know I get lazy, cheap, impatient or complacent sometimes and that can be costly during a paint shoot.  

Current Model Worked On; 1/25 AMT Kenworth W-925 Tractor Kit, Future Models; 1/25 AMT Wilson Cattle Trailer, 1/96 Atlantis Boeing 727, 1/48 AMT Bell 205 Helicopter

  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by JonBailey on Sunday, April 10, 2022 6:30 PM

The bottom line is it seems from what learned so far is that I need to maintain both my paint, paint supplies and painting equiment to a level of clinical cleanliness as found in a chemstry lab. I have been using disposable pipettes since day one. I need to make a habit of straining my paints and keeping them in a fresh clean jar after each and every uses. I takes a lot of work but having to re-prep repaint botched parts is even a lot more work. 

Up until recently, my method has been nearly perfect until I started to slack off on housekeeping for my painting equipment. Andy X has this method and tools/supplies for painting and that is what I always use. 

 

Current Model Worked On; 1/25 AMT Kenworth W-925 Tractor Kit, Future Models; 1/25 AMT Wilson Cattle Trailer, 1/96 Atlantis Boeing 727, 1/48 AMT Bell 205 Helicopter

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