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what tool?

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  • Member since
    November 2005
what tool?
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 1:19 AM
what tool do you use to cut out ailerons, panels and other fine details? I have a dremel but thats to vicious. Whats the weapon of choice for this task.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: United Kingdom / Belgium
Posted by djmodels1999 on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 2:14 AM
ailerons and similar parts, I use a simple knife. Inspection panels and other things like that, I use a drill to 'cut out inside the panel, then a sharp knife to reach the edges of the panel. A new panel is then re-built out of plasticard or the aluminium of a soda can.
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Washington State
Posted by leemitcheltree on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 4:44 AM
Probably best to use the back side of a new number 11 X-Acto blade - but be careful - score very lightly for the first few passes, then get a little more aggressive with the cuts. If you go "hard" from the start, you'll probably run out of the groove, and I can almost guarantee you'll end up with a nice wobbly groove exactly where you won't want it. That's the voice of experience talking..........
Cheers,
LeeTree

Cheers, LeeTree
Remember, Safety Fast!!!

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by nsclcctl on Thursday, August 21, 2003 1:15 PM
I just used a scripe (spelling) tool I purchased from Squadron. I used it to remove the dive brakes from a Hasegawa SBD Dauntless. It worked very well. I then replaced the plastic brakes with an after market I purchased. I don't know what it is called but it is great!
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by glweeks on Monday, September 29, 2003 3:54 PM
I just cut the flaps out of a 1/72 f4f wildcat. used the #11 exacto blade as quoted in the above posts, worked fine if a little time consuming, but a good acurate cut is priceless. If you got the room you might fit a razor blade in the cut and go back and fourth. In larger scales a scriber can work, but I start with the exacto anyway.
Another idea (if the top & bottom wings a seperate) is to drill a hole with a pin vise and bit, insert a jewlers saw blade through the hole connect it to the saw handle and gently saw your way around. All depends on wht scale your in I guess. Also any method you'll see here will allow you the possibility of screwing up the wing or whatever, so have fun, don't make two of yourself (was mom's favorite quote) and don't cuss all of us if it goes south!!!! Ha Ha Ha Ha Haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!
Seimper Fi "65"
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: The flat lands of the Southeast
Posted by styrene on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 6:23 AM
Micromark (www.micromark.com) used to offer a set of saw blades that fit the X-Acto knife handle. The saw blades look like No.11 blades but have teeth. They sell (or sold) a set with both coarse and fine teeth. I have the set, and they are great for getting into those tight, fine spots.
Gip Winecoff

1882: "God is dead"--F. Nietzsche

1900: "Nietzsche is dead"--God

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 30, 2003 9:14 AM
X-acto also makes micro-saws. Your local hobby shop should have them. The #11 blade solution also works quite well for me.

demono69
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, January 6, 2004 3:22 PM
Where can I get a box of those 50 tiny carbide bit drills which are so brittle they break easily? Couldn't find them at Micro-Mark. Or are there any comparable tiny pin drills that can be used either with a pin vise or by hand-twirling that are NOT so brittle which will work as well as the carbide ones? Help!
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Everett
Posted by markuz226 on Monday, January 26, 2004 7:28 AM
Bill,
I bought a carbide set from my LHS under the X-acto name about a year ago. after breaking two bits on my pin vise, I bought a non-carbide one from ebay for alot cheaper (I dunno if it's because of the material or because it's ebay) just two weeks ago. It comes in a lttle box and contains bits #61- #80 and so far, I've been using it with much satisfaction. I just checked and they are still selling a set (with pin vise). try searching "small drill bits #61-80" and you should find it.
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by Boatshop on Monday, January 26, 2004 4:30 PM
Bill, carbide is a very hard metal and because of that, any tool made of it is very brittle. For our hobby high speed steel (H.S.S.) is more than tough enough and will flex some without breaking. Try Wholesale Tool for your drill bit needs. I think the address is wholesaletool.com. Hope this helps.

Jim Q What isn't tried, won't work

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 11:28 AM
Carbide bits, eh? Here's a good source - Harbour Freight. There is a store locator tool on their web site. I've become a regular at the store near me.

Check this out - a set of 50 microbits for $9.99! At that price, an occasional broken bit isn't so bad.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=34640
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