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Brave Souls or Strong Stomachs . . .

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  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Brave Souls or Strong Stomachs . . .
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Saturday, November 21, 2020 11:24 AM

As I am admiring Tubosteve's HMS La Malouine build, I think back to my own seatime. During my 20 years in I'd been to sea in a number of ships ranging from an aircraft carrier of over a thousand feet, down to a salvage ship of 285 feet. But I look at the hull lines of that Flower Class corvette and wonder how anyone could spend any length of time on the North Sea, in a round hulled, single screw bucket like that, and not be hurling their guts out. My hats off to those brave lads; like going to sea on a 55 gallon drum, and having to do battle too. Wow, I'm impressed.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by seastallion53 on Saturday, November 21, 2020 4:00 PM
LPDs have flat bottoms and rock a lot in heavy seas too I spent time on 2 different ones and did a lot of rocking and rolling.
  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Saturday, November 21, 2020 5:31 PM

Something most people don't know is that most ships have flat bottoms; It's the ones that have round bottoms that roll the most, bilge keels or not. As for the amphibs, the Newport Class LST's are the worst, because they are narrow at the bow and the stern, so they sit like a football in the pond, wobbling all over the place. I saw one take green water over the bow and then watched her corkscrew her way back up to the surface, glad I wasn't aboard. 

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by modelcrazy on Saturday, November 21, 2020 5:40 PM

My old Cutter, the Storis (keel laid in July 41), had a round bottom and was stationed in the Bearing. 45 deg roll were very common.

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Saturday, November 21, 2020 9:44 PM

As much as I hate flying, and only did it when I had little or no choice, I would rather fly than get on a boat of any size that had the capability to actually move on the water.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, November 21, 2020 10:44 PM

The Flowers were derived from shore based whaling ships. They handled well and had a low CG. But they served all across the North Atlantic and were wet.

Barf inducing for sure and the accommodations were really minimal.

According to Montserrat, the watch sheltered in all kinds of place such as the Asdic hut or the radar room all of which didn't have truly watertight doors.

 

Bill

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Sunday, November 22, 2020 12:33 AM

We had a similar beastie in Australia. They were called Bathurst class corvettes. Very similar to look at. From 1940 until 1943 they were the only naval force Australia had in home waters. All of our main forces were serving in the North Sea and the Med under control of the RN.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, November 22, 2020 1:00 AM

I've been out fishing out of San Diego enough times to see a few nasty days.  Not sure of the hull design on these fishing boats, but typically 65ish foot.  On days with a lot of swell and chop I've seen folks fall over - could be the beer.  One poor dude split his head open when a pretty decent swell hit broadside and he pitched over and cracked his head on a locker.  I'm guessing these were 15 or 20 degrees tops, couldn't imagine what a 45 degree roll would do!

Thanks,

John

Ain't no reason to hang my head, I could wake up in the mornin' dead 

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