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Yet Another Tamiya 1:48 F4U-1A WIP

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  • Member since
    July, 2016
Yet Another Tamiya 1:48 F4U-1A WIP
Posted by Johnny1000 on Sunday, October 22, 2017 12:10 PM

Hello all 

This is the second part of project modeling the aircraft my grandfather flew in WW2. The first part, a 1/48 Tamiya F4F-4 representing his tour at Guadalcanal with VMF-121 and VMF-223 in the Fall of ’42, is documented here: http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/2/t/172718.aspx  

This time I’m doing the ubiquitous 1/48 Tamiya F4U-1A. Neither the actual airplane nor the kit requires any introduction, so we’ll skip. Instead, a bit of history...

When VMF-121 returned stateside in early 1943, the now legendary Joe Foss was given command of the newly formed VMF-115. My grandfather, Jacob Stub (pronounced “stoob”), newly married, and now a captain, joined him. 

After a tour at Guadalcanal flying Wildcats, the Corsair was a welcome upgrade. In Eric Bergurud’s definitive history of the air war in the Pacific, “Fire In The Sky”, my grandfather commented on the Corsair (while throwing shade at both the Navy and the Hellcat):

This was taken in Santa Barbara just before they shipped off. That’s Stub standing just to the right of the downward propeller blade. Foss, with the mustache and officer’s cap, is kneeling in the center.

(He’s just a kid. They all are.) 

As they trained in California, the air war in the South Pacific was raging, with Greg Boyington’s VMF-214, in particular, racking up impressive records and making headlines back home. The young men of 115 were probably expecting a brawl and more victories to with it. After all, at Guadalcanal Foss had bagged 26 planes in just a couple months. In a Wildcat, no less. My grandfather, got only 4, but most of his first tour he was a wingman, which is a low scoring position. Imagine what they could get done with a serious fighter.  

But by the time they got back in theatre, the mighty Japanese base at Rabaul had collapsed, and the air war had moved on north and east. Professor Bergurud wrote me, “His second tour was on the Island of Emirau where he succeeded Foss as squadron commander. And like Foss, he never saw a Japanese plane during that time.” 

At one point, Charles Lindbergh came to Emirau as part of his famous civilian tour of the theatre to consult on adapting the Corsair to a fighter/bomber role. When I was a kid, I remember Lindbergh's name coming up in front of my grandfather, who snorted and dismissed him as a ‘horse’s ass.’ I think Lindbergh's earlier Nazi sympathies were not readily forgiven, plus my grandfather could get a little salty after a few...

 Foss (L), Lindbergh (R)

One last thing. Here’s an excerpt from the VMF-115 war diary, dated 22 August 1944:

That’s the day my mother was born (international date line aside). I imagine him sitting on his parachute in his plane on the way to or from dropping that thousand pounder on the E. Young Plantation on New Ireland, knowing that he was due to become a father any day while my grandmother was in labor 7500 miles away.

My plan is to try to build a Corsair from VMF-115 at Emirau as it would appear on the afternoon of August 22nd, 1944. To that end, I’ve assembled a kit, references and a bunch of goodies. 

I hope you’ll bare with me. Thanks for looking. 

-J

Tags: 1/48 , Tamiya f4u
  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Sunday, October 22, 2017 2:19 PM

“It was a wonderful weapon and we were delighted to get it” 

I’ll start with the cowling, like everyone else does*

* apologies to chukw  

The kit cowl flaps are fine, but Corsair cowl flaps splay obscenely open, so we should get in up in there. Vector has a lovely resin set which also includes a cowl ring with ribbing detail.

The first thing is to cut the ring from the pour stub, which connects to the front of the ring. I used a Dremel with a cut off wheel for this, then a grinding bit to clear out the middle, sneaking up on the edges. 

Now we need to get to round. A broom handle was about the right diameter.

Twisting on the sandpaper wrapped around got me pretty close. 

To line up the ribs, I made a template on an illustration program and printed out. Blue Tack holds the ring to the template, and then more Blue Tack on the end of toothpick holds the part in place, while sill more Blue Tack holds the toothpick in place. This way, I can line up the parts just how I want them, and then daub a drop of thin CA via capillary action to lock down. One you get going, it’s pretty quick to work your way around.

And here it is. Despite my best attempt, they still aren’t perfectly straight. On closer, if belated, examination of my references, they should also be kind of grouped in twos. These aren't super noticable, more to give the impression of more engineering than anything, so once they're painted and tucked behind the reduction housing, it’ll be fine.

Adding the actuator hardware to the cowl ring is slightly different: BlueTack again holds the part in place, this time so the part being glued can lay flat. A tiny daub regular CA on the actuator and then drop into position, with a few seconds for tweaks.

After all the actuators are in place, we need to thread in the actual cable. Fine wire left over from an electronics project came in handy, but you could use anything. Old computer cables from obsolete standards—firewire 1, SCSI, etc—are useful here. If you don’t happen to have, you almost certainly know someone with a box of unusable cables.

I need to go back a get a few of these a little straighter. Once they aren’t glimmering silver the flaws should be a little less noticeable.

While we’re at it (procrastinating on starting the cockpit, that is!), let’s chop up the rudder so it can sit at a nice angle.

  

A JLC razor saw makes quick work of it with minimal collateral damage.

I also cut out the trim tab so I can give that a little nudge over as well. In scraping out the molded trim actuator, which is going to get replaced later, I overshot a bit. Yikes! But not to worry...

Gently sand down with assorted Micro Mesh Swabs, then fill with Mr Surfacer 500. Let that sit a few minutes, and then wipe across with a q-tip dipped in Mr Color Thinner, and sand again. The Mr Color Thinner is really mild, and won’t melt the plastic (as least, not right away).

I glued the rudder halves together, and then used oversized .020 and .010 sheet styrene from Evergreen to cover. Later, I’ll trim down and sand in the curved front shape. 

That’s it for now. Thanks for looking.

-J

  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Cleveland, OH
Posted by RadMax8 on Sunday, October 22, 2017 2:55 PM

You know, for you limited modeling experience, you're damn good. Add to that a wonderful personal connection and history, and you've got quite the build log going. I enjoyed the Wildcat, and I'm sure I'm going to love the Corsair. I've got two of those planes in my case.

Your grandpa really threw some serious flak to the Navy! Pretty darn funny...

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Sunday, October 22, 2017 3:03 PM

Hello Johnny!

Good to see you doing a WIP again! For me, modelling is so much better when you can mix it with some real history! And that's what you are doing now, cool! Good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    December, 2002
Posted by 7474 on Sunday, October 22, 2017 7:05 PM
Great start, I’ Looking forward to seeing the finished model.
  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posted by ridleusmc on Sunday, October 22, 2017 11:08 PM

I love the history and scratchbuilding with this one.  

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by MrStecks on Sunday, October 22, 2017 11:41 PM

Wow, great looking build so far and a great historical family connection.  That's awesome.  Thanks for sharing the history, and posting this WIP.  I'll be following.

Cheers, Mark


On the bench: Eduard 1/32 P-47 Dottie Mae

In the queue: Eduard 1/48 F6F-3 Weekend Edition;  Tamiya 1/32 P-51 Mustang;  Eduard F2 190A-9 ProfiPACK Edition;  WNW 1/32 Fokker D.VII (Fok.) "Early";  Revell 1/48 B-25J;  AMT 1/48 Lockheed Vega;  AMT 1/48 Stinson Reliant SR-9;  Revell 1/48 TBF Avenger;  Hasegawa 1/48 Nakajima E8N1 Type 95 Reconnaissance Seaplane (DAVE) Model 1

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Monday, October 23, 2017 5:21 AM

RadMax8: thanks! And yeah, he was a bit of a wit. 

Pawel: thanks, my friend. Appreciate it.  

7474: me too!

ridleusmc: that's kind of the best part, right?

MrStecks: great, thanks!

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Brisbane Australia
Posted by ChrisJH666 on Monday, October 23, 2017 2:53 PM

This is looking like a really great build! Very impressive so far, and I love the personal history aspect. Definitely be keeping an eye on your posts for when I get around to doing an RNZAF example

Chris

  • Member since
    June, 2013
Posted by bvallot on Monday, October 23, 2017 5:30 PM

Johnny that looks like a big bag of goodies right there!! =] I think every Tamiya Corsair ought to come with that cowling ring set from Vector. That's the first time I had even heard of them was when I was looking up AM stuff for my Boyington Corsair I did a while back. I ended up doing the same thing too. I didn't see that they grouped up until after. Although, at 1:48 I don't think it will quite appear as such possibly due to the fact that the mounts are a tad bit oversized. Even at 1:32 they don't quite seem like they do on the real thing. Still, it's an upgrade to a terribly overlooked part of the aircraft. Nobody gives any love to the engine interior...not even on radial engines...? Anyhow, ought to be a fun build to watch. That Quickboost engine is a nice addtion too. You'll like it. Any plans on doing something about the exhaust?

Looking forward to seeing what you come up with. =]

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Monday, October 23, 2017 7:48 PM

Great historical connection.  That is just amazing!  I really love what you’re doing with the Corsair, fantastic scratch building.  Keep up the good work, I’ll be definitely following your WIP.

Toshi

 

Retired due to work related injury

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

ON THE BENCH:

Revell B-17G Flying Fortress 

NEXT BUILD:

Mrs. Toshi just purchased for me a Tamiya 1/48 Ki-61 via eBay, when it arrives, as always, I’ll do a WIP.  Thanks to M.Brindos and Model Maniac for the heads up and the inspiration in obtaining this kit for my next build.

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 9:52 AM

I'm totaly impressed with your ability to super detail these kits, something I want to do on all my models as well.  TY for the inspiration and how-to.

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 12:23 PM

ChrisJH666: Thanks, and I'm excited to see your RNZAF build. The contributions of our Kiwi friends in turning the tide in the South Pacific are all too often neglected.

bvallot: Too many goodies. :)  Agreed about the cowl ring. And yes, those ribs are way overscale. I've kind of thought about scratch building more appropriately scaled ribs but getting 18 consistant enough seems like a huge project. I could try casting, I guess. Or home photoetching... hmmm. Maybe if I just disregard the cross brace?

(And yes, I have Quickbook exahust pipes.)

Toshi: Thanks Toshi. I know you're a real Corsair buff, so I'll try not to dissapoint. 

Jay Jay: Thanks. I've been so inspired and learned so much from the crew here,  it only seems fair. I'm just fumbling through, so take what I have to say for what it's worth!

 

The seat on a real Corsair was basically just a metal bucket—the pilot sat on his parachute for a “cushion.” So it follows that photo etched brass would make the basis for a reasonable facsimile. I have the kit seat, of course, and an Ultracast resin version, but let’s see how the seat from the Eduard PE set builds out, while trying a new (to me) technique at the same time.

Materials: iron, flux, solder, extra hands, and something to solder.

I’ve done a bit of electronics soldering, but this is my first go with something like this. I was intimidated to try soldering precisely enough for modeling, but I did a couple experiments (and have a backup plan), so decided to give it a go. 

First we need to cut out and form the part. A quick remedial for those who are new to working with photoetch (looking in the mirror, here). A firm surface—acetate, in this case—and a curved blade help us avoid deforming the part while cutting. 

Flat pliers help hold the part in place while filing off the fret stubs with a fine file.

A bending tool can help make precise bends with small parts. This is The BUG (not sure why it’s all caps, but that’s what they call it) but they all seem to work similarly. I got it because it was the cheapest all metal design I could find. 

Slip the part to be folded in an appropriate cut out, lock down, and then slide a razor blade under and gently fold up. Easy peasy.

Do the other side the same way. (With complex shapes, think through the folds first, so you don’t fold yourself into a corner.)

And finally fold up the seat by hand. The seat needs a curve formed into the end to match the curve of the sides. I used a dowel as a guide. In the process I broke off the bottom. It’s not a big deal, but makes the first soldering step a bit trickier.

Soldering!

The principal is simple enough: heat the pieces to be joined enough that they melt the solder, creating a 'welded' (nerd alert: what’s actually happening is ‘intermetallic bonding’) joint. Don’t try to melt the solder directly with the iron, because unless the parts being joined are hot enough, the solder won’t dissolve in the base and there won’t be a strong join. 

There’s a bunch of ways this could go sideways, and I’m sure I’ll find most of them. 

First, dab on a bit of flux where you want the solder to flow. The solder I’m using happens to be rosin core, which is usually enough flux for electronics work, but we can’t depend on that to guide the solder for this. 

The solder escaped a bit. Bugger! But I can sand this down and it will be fine. I couldn’t get the parts aligned with the helping hands, so the seat bottom rests on the second hand, and then I’m pushing it into place with a toothpick and a bit a blue tack. (You’d think the blue tack would melt, but it was fine.)

Continue with the sides, and soon enough, voila…  a seat!  The nice thing about solder is that it’s file/sandable. You don’t want to leave giant globs, but if it’s a bit messy, you can clean it up. I still have to add the cross panel, but my Jedi soldering skills aren’t quite there yet for fine work, so I’m going to attach with CA.

L to R: kit seat, the brass seat, and the Ultracast. 

The kit seat is out. It looks like an industrial, padded barkalounger. 

This isn’t a great shot of the Ultracast, but I’m not feeling it yet. The detail is a bit mushy. That top bar (omitted from the kit, and needs to be addressed regardless) is a bit droopy, which doesn’t give much confidence in protecting poor Captain Stub on his mission (and if he doesn't come back, that would change the whole course of history, making my eventual appearance much less likely!).  

I haven’t completely decided, but I’m leaning toward the Eduard at the moment. There’s a slight misalignment on the cross panel—riding a touch high on the left, operator error—but I’m pretty sure I can hide that with an artfully placed seatbelt.

One interesting thing to note: the kit seat is 16 scale inches wide, the Ultracast 17”, and the Eduard 18”. Later, I gently squeezed the brass, slightly increasing the radius in the seat back and got it down to 17 scale inches. Does anyone know what the width of a standard US aircraft bucket seat actually was?

That’s it for now. Thanks for looking.

-J

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 1:43 PM

Hello Johnny!

Nice try wit that soldering! One thing to watch for - Eduard isn't all-knowing neither, and theit sets, although generally good, very often have errors, too. As always, you have to back up everything with your own research. That piece with those three holes, where the seat back meats the seat base looks way off in comparison with the two parts, but that might be some other variant - without lots of research you never know.

Did you try to soften the brass for bending? When you have "gentle" bends, it's good to do this. Just hold the part to be worked with to a flame (a Zippo will do) until it gets red-hot, then let cool slowly. You'll note that the part will get much softer, much nicer to work with.

As for soldering - try getting thiner soldering wire. Not only will it help you with the solder excess - so less sanding, it also has more flux proportionally, and the best - you can use that wire for making hydraulic lines and stuff like that.

You might also consider soldering paste - it is used for so called reflow soldering. The paste is flux mixed with powdered solder. You put the paste between two surfaces to be soldered and heat everything to about 300 Celsius. The paste melts and then bonds the soldered surfaces together - no runs, no nonsense.

Good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 2:44 PM

Thanks Pawel, as always, great advice. Check references, always.

And where were you the other day when I was goofing around with a soldering iron? Am checking out both solder paste and thinner solder. 

Cheers

-J

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 3:03 PM

Yeah, you shoulda called for me! Big Smile

Keep up the great work!

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by KnightTemplar5150 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 4:04 PM

Thought that it might be worth mentioning that brass is commonly treated with either oil or an anti-corrosion compound to keep it shiny and appealing to consumers. Solder will never flow properly into a joint properly if this stuff is not removed and it normally results in excessive amounts of solder being applied, pitting, and "cold" joints that are weak. As a jeweler, I give brass parts a bath in a heated pickling solution to remove the antioxidants, but while I worked in military aerospace electronics, 90% isopropyl alcohol was  commonly used with an acid brush to scrub off the film prior to soldering. A strong degreaser, such as Purple Power, can also be used.Once the brass is cleaned, soldering becomes pretty easy to do and things flow a lot easier, so you can avoid having to file off excess solder.

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 10:02 AM

Great point.

I forgot to mention I actually did wipe down with acetone first. Scrubbing with 90% IA may have been been better... but yes, proper cleaning the surface to be soldered is important. 

Thanks

-J

 

  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Cleveland, OH
Posted by RadMax8 on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 9:55 PM

Johnny,

As a professional welding engineer by day (for now, anyway), I cannot condone your fast and loose use of the word “welding”, however as a rank amateur modeler, I can certainly appreciate the skill required to solder the PE together. So all is forgiven! Ha!

Looks great. Keep up the good work!

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Brisbane Australia
Posted by ChrisJH666 on Saturday, October 28, 2017 8:35 PM

With etched brass, what I do is use very fine wet-&-dry paper to rub over both sides of the etched sheet before components are removed so that all traces of tarnish or coatings is removed. This gives a far better clean key for the solder. Works like a charm without the need for wiping with nasty chemicals. Well, works for me anyway

Chris

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Friday, November 03, 2017 1:26 PM

RadMax8: Zing! I knew I was treading into dangerous territory with that, but thanks for the encouragement anyway.

ChrisJH666: Thanks for the tip, that makes a lot of sense.

Speaking of soldering, on Pawel's suggestion I got thinner solder and solder paste. Now I just need something to solder...

Busy work + gnarly cold = slow progress. But I did manage to get some stuff in over the past week or so. 

Uncle Eduard helped fill in a lot of missing or poorly formed detail in the cockpit. 

The elevator tab wheel (at least I think that’s what it is) seems over scale, so I tried scratch building something a little smaller with punched styrene discs and a bit of lead wire. I’m going to try to smooth everything out with Mr Surfacer. 

I really like the detail on the Eduard instrument panel. It’s not super accurate for a Corsair, which had a relatively featureless IP, but I think I’m okay with that.

The base coat is Tamiya XF-69, NATO black, followed by Tamiya X-22 clear. Once that dried a bit, I did black oil wash around the bezels and a medium grey wash to pull out fastener detail. I still need to pick out buttons and add placards, etc.

Sitting on the ‘film’ with the actual instruments (don't mind the secondary panel, which isn't quite lined up). I need to clean it up a little, but this just might work.

That's all's I got. Hopefully I'll sneak down a bit this weekend. I still have to figure out the seat mount, and which seat, if any of those, I'm going to use, and then I can start pulling the cockpit together. 

Thanks for looking!

-J

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • From: Parma, Ohio
Posted by lawdog114 on Sunday, November 05, 2017 12:13 AM
This is good stuff. Thanks for the historical background too. I look forward to this. Word of caution. Add reinforcements from inside when you attach the outer wings. It’s a very weak joint. I used sheet styrene.

 "Can you fly this plane and land it?...Surely you can't be serious....I am serious, and don't call me Shirley"

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Sunday, November 05, 2017 3:17 AM

Great work!

Your friend, Toshi

 

Retired due to work related injury

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

ON THE BENCH:

Revell B-17G Flying Fortress 

NEXT BUILD:

Mrs. Toshi just purchased for me a Tamiya 1/48 Ki-61 via eBay, when it arrives, as always, I’ll do a WIP.  Thanks to M.Brindos and Model Maniac for the heads up and the inspiration in obtaining this kit for my next build.

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Sunday, November 05, 2017 12:12 PM

Interesting bio on your grandfather. I like his forthrightness Wink.

The F4U, as for many, is my favorite fighter aircraft from the propeller age. There were many fine fighters during WWII - I like several of them a lot - but "Whistling Death" is by far the one I admire most.

You sure have a lot of moxie jumping in there to attempt all the modifications, scratch building, PE, etc. on this build. I am following with great interest.

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 3:26 PM

Lawdog: Thanks, and thanks for the heads up about the outer wings! 

Toshi: Thanks, Toshi. Very kind.

1943Mike: Yeah, he was defnitely not someone to keep his opinions to himself. And thanks much.

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Monday, November 13, 2017 2:58 PM

Hello all. I got in bit more work on the cockpit this weekend. 

First up is the chair mount. As rendered by Tamiya, it’s made up of solid triangles of chunky plastic, which provides good support for the chair, but isn’t especially accurate. This is probably a bit too deep into rivet counting nerdery for most, but I was interested in the challenge. This turned out to be easier than it looks.

After first measuring the apex of the triangle—that is to say, the point furthest from the bulkhead—I cut .030 styrene rod for the mount using the Chopper II to help keep lengths consistent and also to take advantage of the angle guides. A bit of blu tack holds the parts in place while dabbing a bit Tamiya Thin to glue.

After making each triangle structure, I connect them with more rod measured to the width of the chair. (I ended up deciding to go with the Ultracast. While the Eduard seat has the most character, the Ultracast just looks the most like the real thing.)

Once it was completed, it was time for surgery on the bulkhead. (Don't mind that the bottom bar isn't quite square...)

I nibbled the chunky triangles away with sprue cutters, and then filed the remainder. This left gaping holes, with I filled with styrene chunks and CA. You won’t be able to see it once the chair’s in, but it seemed worth it to take a minute to fill. The protruding top bars are anchored in holes carefully drilled into the middle of the molded on bracing. I’ll trim them to the exact length when I mount the chair, but first I’m going to paint everything separately. If I need to, I’ll add additional support at the bottom. 

I have a reference that shows a lot of plumbing in the lower front bulkhead, which I made from small gauge electrical wire and .3mm solder. This probably isn’t really all that accurate as much as impressionistic, but it looks okay while also hiding the join with the foot trough assembly. (The PE supports help sell the trough a bit better.) 

Finally, for now, I started painting the console. It needs a little tidying up here and there, but is starting to look okay. 

I still need to add the document case on the starboard side, and I’m probably going to scratch build the manual bomb release, which goes to the left of the trim tab wheel on the port side. 

One thing that is sort of vexing is the oxygen bottle. I didn't paint it until everything else and had a really hard time masking it. Plus yellow just isn’t the easiest color to deal with. It’s also not rendered correctly, in that it’s molded into a panel on the console, where it should be strapped to the back bulkhead. I think I’m going to fix all these problems by just cutting it out, trimming the excess, adding straps and nozzle detail and then painting it on it's own at my lesiure.

That's it for now. It's almost ready for washes and weathering. Hopefully more soon.

Thanks for looking.

-J

  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Cleveland, OH
Posted by RadMax8 on Monday, November 13, 2017 10:15 PM

Nice update. Boy you aren’t afraid to get fiddly, are you? That chair bracing made my eyes go cross!

Tamiya sort of mailed it in with some details on this kit. The bomb rack has solid supports, much like the chair supports. When I built mine with the bomb rack, I actually used solid wire to approximate some detail. 

Your builds are a delight. I hope you keep building after you run out of subjects associated with your grandfather. They won’t have the same great personal relevance, but if your skills are this good after two kits, imagine what you can do with a few more under your belt. 

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 12:28 AM

Thanks RadMax, that's very kind of you to say. I'm having a lot of fun (especially the fiddly bits), and have a few ideas for subjects percolating, but it takes me a bit to turn a build around, so I have time to work it out.

I'm weirdly psyched about how they molded the bomb rack--it means I get to scratch build a Brewster bomb rack! I have a few ideas there...

I had a few minutes tonight, so here's a quick update:

That oxygen bottle was really bothering me, especially once I worked out how it is mounted in the prototype. Using a combo of J&L fine razor saw, scalpel, and a Mission Models micro chisel, I carved it out. Gruesome! The riffler file (the weirdly curved file) helped me get in that spot to smooth out the remaining surface where a straight file would've been clumsy, though I’ll probably just fit in some .005 sheet styrene and call it a day.

Ooof! Gnarly! (And naked, post Windex bath)

A bit of Milliput epoxy putty helps fill in the missing chunk. Once it’s fully set, I’ll sand it down to shape. Worst case, I’ll snip off the nozzle bit altogether, flip it over, and start over with new nozzle detailing on the other end so any misshapen bit is tucked out of the way.

It’s a stupid detail that no one will notice, but it makes me so much happier.

Thanks for looking. Onward!

-J

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 12:59 AM

Great attention to detail!

Your friend, Toshi

 

Retired due to work related injury

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

ON THE BENCH:

Revell B-17G Flying Fortress 

NEXT BUILD:

Mrs. Toshi just purchased for me a Tamiya 1/48 Ki-61 via eBay, when it arrives, as always, I’ll do a WIP.  Thanks to M.Brindos and Model Maniac for the heads up and the inspiration in obtaining this kit for my next build.

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by Johnny1000 on Monday, November 20, 2017 4:12 PM

Oxygen Bottle Redux!

Apparently my sculpting skills with Milliput are a bit feeble. That, plus I wanted to play with a new toy, so I didn’t really try that hard to get the kit oxygen bottle in shape, but instead decided to start from scratch.

The material is a length of sprue.

Chucking it into a cheapo Chinese mini drill press with a file as a kludgey vertical lathe, I first turned it to get the radius I wanted…

…then used varying grit sandpaper to round the ends. For the second end, I trimmed it to a little over length and then flipped it, and chucked the round end in, just hand tightening to turn.

To drill the hole for the nozzle, I used the drill press as a drill press, with small bit carbide bits. Again, just hand tighten. That way if the bit snags, it’s less likely to break. The white stuff is a bit of an old sponge to keep the vise from damaging the soft plastic work piece. 

To make the nozzle, I used Albion aluminum tubing. I first had to drill a hole in the side of the neck part (just peeking out from under the sponge)so I could have a positive connection to the actual nozzle.

The almost finished result. The valve is just punched .005 styrene sheet, and the stem is the next size down Albion tubing. The straps are from the Eduard detail set for this kit. They're a bit big, but I really like the detail so I'm tempted to leave them on.

I need to touch up the paint, which got a little dinged while getting the straps on, but I figure it would be pretty banged up anyway if the ground crews have to regularly pull it to recharge, so I’m going to do chips and dings. This will get attached to the console when I mate it to the back bulkhead.

More soon. Thanks for looking.

-J

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