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Aces Group Build Photo & Information Page

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  • Member since
    October 2009
  • From: Oil City, PA
Aces Group Build Photo & Information Page
Posted by greentracker98 on Friday, December 5, 2014 10:16 PM

Okay, I decided to create a new page for the Information and Photos of our Ace Pilots. That way all the discussions and etc won't get in the way of these posts

So, Everyone please post info and Ace Photo ONLY here

A.K.A. Ken                Making Modeling Great Again

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Saturday, December 6, 2014 1:09 AM

Here's my entry.

Emanuele Annoni "Ele", flying the Macchi C 202 Regia Aeronautica 96a Squadriglia, 9o Gruppo, 4o Stormo

9 individual, 10 shared victories

Born in Milan on April 19 1916, Annoni entered the Air Force Academy in 1936. In 1939 he was assigned to the 9o Gruppo, 4o Stormo Caccia Terrestre, equipped with the Fiat C.R. 42 Falco. When Italy entered the war on June 10 1940 and operated against France. In 1941 Annoni was assigned to the Macchi C 202 as his new mount.

During his career, Annoni shot down Hurricane’s, P-40’s and Spitfire’s. After the Armistice, September 8, 1943, Annoni operated with the Italian co-belligerent Air Force where he fought against the Germans and shot down a  Messerschmitt Bf 109 G of the III Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 27.

After the war, Annoni stayed in the Italian Air Force as Chief Operations Office of 4o Stormo and then Commander of the 6th group of the 4th Wing equipped with De Havilland Vampires. After a later political career he died in Rome, December 2004.

3 Medaglia d'argento al valor militare (Bronze Medal for military valor)
War merit Cross (first award)
War merit Cross (second award)
War merit Cross (3rd Award)

 

#2

 

Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen (2 May 1892 – 21 April 1918), also known as the Red Baron, was officially credited with 80 air combat victories.
Originally a cavalryman, Richthofen transferred to the Air Service in 1915, becoming one of the first members of Jasta 2 in 1916. He quickly distinguished himself as a fighter pilot, and during 1917 became leader of Jasta 11 and then the larger unit Jagdgeschwader 1, better known as the "Flying Circus". By 1918, he was regarded as a national hero in Germany, and well-known amongst opposing forces.
Richthofen was shot down and killed near Amiens on 21 April 1918. There has been considerable discussion and debate regarding aspects of his career, especially the circumstances of his death. Richthofen was buried in the cemetery at the village of Bertangles, near Amiens, on 22 April 1918. Six of No. 3 squadron's officers served as pallbearers, and a guard of honor from the squadron's other ranks fired a salute. Allied squadrons stationed nearby presented memorial wreaths, one of which was inscribed with the words, "To Our Gallant and Worthy Foe". Richthofen remains perhaps the most widely known fighter pilot of all time.

Last words   "kaputt"


#3

William Whisner

Only one Air Force pilot was both an ace in two wars and a three-time winner of the DSC.

Lt. William Whisner joined the 352nd Fighter Group's 487th Squadron at Bodney, England, in the fall of 1943. He had the great good fortune to study air combat under two men who were to become masters of the art: Squadron Commander Maj. John C. Meyer and Capt. George Preddy, whose wing he often flew.

On Jan. 29, 1944, while flying a P-47, he downed his first enemy aircraft, an FW-190. The 352nd converted to P-51s in April. At the end of the following month, Whisner shot down a second -190 in a 15-minute dogfight against the best German pilot he encountered during the war. The next day, he shared an Bf-109 kill with Preddy.

After some hometime, Whisner, now a captain, rejoined the 487th Squadron in the fall of 1944. On Nov. 2, he downed a Bf-109. On Nov. 21 he led a flight of P-51s on an escort mission to Merseburg, Germany. As the bombers left their target, a large formation of enemy fighters struck. Meyer (now a lieutenant colonel) told Whisner to take a straggler in one of the enemy's three six-ship cover flights. In a linked series of attacks, Whisner shot down four FW-190s in the cover flight and probably got another.

With no more than two -190s left in the cover flight he had attacked, Whisner turned his attention to the main enemy formation, exploding a -190 that had not dropped its belly tank. Evading three -190s on his tail, he shot down another that was closing on one of his pilots. Then, low on ammunition, he joined up with Meyer and returned to Bodney.

For that achievement, Whisner was awarded his first Distinguished Service Cross--second only to the Medal of Honor.

During the Battle of the Bulge, which started on Dec. 16, the 487th Squadron was moved forward to airfield Y-29 near Asche, Belgium. On New Year's Day 1945, Whisner was one of 12 Mustang pilots led by Meyer that had started their takeoff roll when a large formation of FW-190s and Bf-109s hit the field. In the ensuing battle, fought at low altitude and before the 487th had time to form up, Whisner shot down a -190, then was hit by 20-mm fire. With his windshield and canopy covered by oil and one aileron damaged, Whisner stayed in the fight, shooting down two more -190s and a Bf-109. He was awarded a second DSC for that day's work--one of only 14 USAAF men to be so honored in World War II. (Meyer received his third DSC, the only Air Force pilot to receive three DSCs in World War II.) At the end of the war, Whisner had 15.5 victories, which put him in the top 20 USAAF aces of the European Theater.

Bill Whisner returned to combat in Korea, flying F-86s, and becoming the seventh jet ace of the Korean War and the first in the 51st Wing. Whisner was awarded a third Distinguished Service Cross, the only Air Force man other than Meyer to earn that distinction. He also became one of only six Air Force pilots who were aces in both World War II and Korea. In the post-Korea years, Whisner continued his career as a fighter pilot, winning the Bendix Trophy Race in 1953. After retiring as a colonel, he finally settled down in his home state of Louisiana. On July 21 1989, Col. William Whisner died of a yellow jacket sting.


  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Saturday, December 6, 2014 1:02 PM

My first Ace will be Neville Duke of Great Britain. He was the most successful Allied Ace of the Mediterranean theater and had a combined total kill count of 27. He later became an accomplished test pilot and died in 2007. In 1953 he set the world air speed record at 727.63MPH in a Hawker Hunter. He was shot down twice, once by enemy aircraft and once by flak, and returned to flying after the events. 

The next Ace I have chosen to build along with Neville is German Ace Karl-Heinz Krahl. He had a total of 19 kills to his credit and served only in the Western Theater. He flew a BF109F-4 and was awarded numerous citations and medals for his victories. On 21 November 1941, Krahl was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG 3 He was shot down and killed by anti-aircraft fire on April 14, 1942 while on a strafing run in his F-4. 

Karl-Heinz Krahl


These two kits I will build for sure. The next two I am going to try very hard to work in as well.


William "Bill" Arthur Shomo served in the Pacific theater near and became an Ace in a day and received the Medal of Honor for doing it. Although he flew in many aircraft I will be doing "Snooki Two", his P-39Q. During a flight with another pilot they found a flight of Japanese fighters escorting bombers and snuck in behind them and closing with 40 yards before he engaged them. He shot down four Tonys and a bomber on his first pass. Two fighters followed the bomber down and peeled off. Bill climbed high to avoid a Tojo and then dove to engage the fleeing Tonys and shot both of them down on the second pass. His wing-man shot down three others of the remaining 6 planes. Bill had shot down 7 planes in under 6 minutes with only two passes. He shot down one other plane just days before. His only kills of the war totally 8. 



The final Ace for my attempted madness here will be a Soviet named Capt. A. V. Shlopov of 6 IAP, 6 IAK (Fighter Air Corp), IA-PVO (Moscow Air Defense). He flew several planes but one of his first was a Mig-3 Late version without a radio. He is listed as an Ace in the Soviet Aces of WWII but I have not been able to find the number of kills. I'll keep looking. His picture has eluded me as well but, again I'll keep looking. 







On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 3:54 PM

A photo of Adolph Gysbert "Sailor" Malan, of RAF's 74 Squadron and an unnamed friend.

Top South African Ace

RAF   G/C   -   DSO & Bar,  DFC & Bar, 
MiD,  MC,  Croix de Guerre (Belge)

Born in Wellington S. Africa 3 October 1910
In 1924 he boarded the ship General Botha as a cadet
Jr. deck Officer, Union Castle Steamship Line - 1927
Applied for an RAF short service commission late in 1935
Started training in England - early 1936
Becoming "Sailor" to his new RAF mates
Posted to 74 Squadron in December 1936
Promoted to F/L in March 1939
Saw 1st combats over Dunkirk in May 1940
Took command of 74 Sq. on 8 August 1940
Penned his famous "10 Rules of Air Fighting" (* below)
Continued on combat operations until mid 1941
As Wing Leader at Biggin Hill
Joined 58 OTU in August 1941
Did a lecture tour in the US with some other RAF pilots
- October, November & December 1941
1942 - CO of Central Gunnery School at Sutton Bridge
Promoted to Group Captain in October 1942
Returned to Biggin Hill on January 1st 1943 as CO
Took Command of 19 Fighter Wing 2TAF Oct. 1943
CO of 145 Free French Wing in March 1944
CO of Advanced Gunnery School Catfoss in July 1944
Attended RAF Staff College in 1945
Had a change of heart and left the RAF in 1946
Was involved in politics after the war fighting against 
  - S.A. Apartheid until he died of Parkinson's in Sept. 1963

  

Alifero tollitur axe ceres

 

 

 

Mij
  • Member since
    September 2014
Posted by Mij on Thursday, December 11, 2014 10:38 PM

Guy Pierre Bordelon:

In the Korean War he was the only US Navy ace, only night fighter ace, and likely the last US ace to achieve his kills in a propeller aircraft.

Bordelon was born in Ruston, Louisiana, in 1922. He became an Eagle Scout and in 1939 graduated from high school in Alexandria. He began pre-law studies at Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, and later enrolled in Louisiana State University, where he remained until mid-1942. He joined the Navy and in September began pre-flight training in Georgia as an aviation cadet. He first flew the Boeing N2S Kaydet from Hensley Field near Dallas, Texas, and then moved south to Corpus Christi for advanced training. He received his wings and commission to ensign in May 1943, then became an instructor. In the spring of 1944, he checked out in the Grumman FM-2 Wildcat and before the end of World War II went to a squadron on the USS Corregidor.

Bordelon never saw combat, but had found his future, naval aviation, and soon applied for the regular Navy. He joined Fighter Squadron 11 to fly the Grumman F6F Hellcat and made an around-the-world cruise aboard the USS Valley Forge. He served in various fighter squadrons, and command and staff billets until 1950. As the Korean War began, Bordelon was a staff officer aboard the cruiser USS Helena. In April 1952, he reported to Moffett Field, California, and took charge of a detachment flying an all-weather radar-equipped Vought F4U Corsair. Cruising off Korea, on the USS Princeton, Bordelon and "team dog" performed night interdiction over the rugged peninsula. He flew 41 low-level missions against Communist transportation systems and earned three air medals.

In the summer of 1953, Fifth Air Force requested his team's services to combat slow, low-flying Communist aircraft harassing United Nations forces at night. Several USAF jets had been lost trying to engage the "Bed Check Charlies." Bordelon and three other pilots went ashore to the U.S. Marine Corps base at Pyongtaek, south of Seoul, and got into action quickly. Shortly before midnight on 29 June 1953, Bordelon shot down two Yakovlev 18s. The next night he destroyed two Lavochkin fighters. At 0100 on 17 July, he knocked down another Lavochkin while dodging anti-aircraft fire. Bordelon scored all his victories in the same Corsair, named "Annie Mo" for his wife.

In November 1953, he went to Europe to instruct pilots of the French  Aeronavale to fly Corsairs. He returned to the United States in 1954 and served in various command and staff positions in the United States and Pacific. Before he retired, Bordelon served on the staff of Commander, Task Force 140, supporting  Apollo recovery missions. In a 27-year career, Bordelon flew over 15,000 hours, earned the Navy Cross, and two Silver Stars.

On the bench

1:48 Testors SPAD XIII

1:48 Revell P-47D Razorback

1:48 Hasegawa Bf 109E Galland

  • Member since
    May 2014
Posted by Nomad53 on Monday, January 5, 2015 8:11 AM

Walter Beckham

353rd FG Ace - 18 Aerial Victories

Walter C. Beckham was born on May 12, 1916, in Paxton, Florida. He became a United States Army Air Corps cadet in early 1941, commissioned a Second Lieutenant in December, and then assigned to the Canal Zone and Ecuador. With the rank of Captain, he joined the 353rd Fighter Group, flying P-47s. They moved out to Goxhill, England in mid-1943.

In August, the Group switched its base to Metfield, from where it flew its first combat mission. Beckham himself scored his first kill in late September, an FW 190 over Nantes. After bagging a Bf-109 on October 6, he made ace on the 10th, by destroying three twin-engined Messerschmitts.

During the winter of 1943-44, his score mounted, with his victories frequently coming in pairs. By mid-February, he had 18 victories, at that time tops in the ETO. On Feb. 22, on his 57th mission, he was hit by flak over Ostheim. He bailed out successfully, but was captured and remained a POW until April, 1945.

Postwar, he stayed with the Air Force, attended three different universities, and, in 1962, earned a PhD in physics. He worked at the Air Force Weapons Lab as its chief scientist until his retirement in June, 1969.

Beckham's decorations include: DSC, Silver Star with 4 OLC's, Legion of Merit, DFC with 4 OLC's, Air Medal with 5 OLC's, and the Belgian Croix de Guerre.

Nomad53


 

  • Member since
    May 2014
Posted by Nomad53 on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 2:11 PM

My apologies, I had the wrong plane and pilot. The kit I have is a P-47D Bubbletop  not the Razorback. So here is my new plane and pilot.

Fred J. Christensen, Ace in a day

In 1942, Christensen joined the United States Army Air Forces as an aviation cadet and was commissioned in December 1942. After pursuit training, 2nd Lt. Christensen went to the Eighth Air Force in England in July 1943. Completing an operational training unit course at RAF Atcham to familiarize himself with the P-47 Thunderbolt fighter, he joined the 56th Fighter Group, based at RAF Halesworth, as a replacement pilot on August 26, 1943.

Christensen was assigned to the 62d Fighter Squadron. He was credited with his first German aircraft shot down on November 26, 1943, a Messerschmitt Bf 110 near Papenburg, Germany. He was recognized as an ace on February 11, 1944, with the crediting of his fifth kill, a Bf 109. He continued to regularly shoot down German aircraft, scoring two kills on the first day of Big Week, another on a long-range bomber escort to Berlin on March 6, and four more in consecutive missions of March 15 and 16.

Promoted to first lieutenant in February and captain in April, Christensen shot down his 16th aircraft on July 5, and also that day incurred the first battle damage of his tour.[2] On July 7, leading the 62nd FS, Christensen was returning from a bomber escort mission and overflew Gardelegen Airfield, assessing it as a possible strafing target. Christensen noted numerous parked aircraft dispersed on the field, but then observed a flight of Junkers Ju 52 transports in trail at very low altitude, approaching to land.

Christensen dove on the landing pattern from 10,000 feet (3,000 m) and shot down the next-to-last transport with hits on the left side. He quickly overtook and fired at a second target, which burned and crashed. A third transport attempted to evade to the left, but he downed it with a deflection burst, setting its fuel tanks on fire. The German pilot attempted to land, but crashed short of the field.

As Christensen maneuvered for a fourth interception, his engine quit from fuel starvation. Christensen switched tanks, air-started his engine, and barely 100 feet (30 m) off the ground, fixed another Ju 52 in his sights. He scored several hits, and in its attempt to evade, the transport flew into the ground. Christensen attacked a fifth airplane, observing strikes on its fuselage and wing root, and shot it down before it could land. He then destroyed a sixth Ju 52 to become an "ace in a day" in an engagement that had lasted less than two minutes. In all, 10 of the 12 transports were shot down by the 62nd FS.

Christensen flew 107 combat sorties with the 56th Fighter Group and used five different aircraft to record his victories, including two assigned as his personal aircraft:

    P-47D-10-RE 42-75207 LM: C, named "Boche Buster" on the nose cowling and Rozzie Geth near the cockpit, and
    P-47D-25-RE 42-26628 LM: C, named Miss Fire and Rozzie Geth II. ("Rozzie Geth" was a diminutive of the name of a college girlfriend, Rosamand Gethro.)

Christensen's 21.5 officially credited kills rank him 12th among all Army Air Forces aces, 7th among aces of the Eighth Air Force, and 5th among P-47 aces.

Nomad53


 

  • Member since
    October 2009
  • From: Oil City, PA
Posted by greentracker98 on Sunday, January 11, 2015 2:41 AM
 My First Ace is Egon Mayer.   Egon Mayer (19 August 1917 – 2 March 1944) was a German Luftwaffe military aviator during World War II, a fighter ace credited with 102 enemy aircraft shot down in over 353 combat missions. His victories were all claimed over the Western Front and included 26 four-engine bombers, 51 Supermarine Spitfires and 12 P-47 Thunderbolts. Mayer was the first fighter pilot to score 100 victories entirely on the Western Front. Born in Konstanz, Mayer, who was a glider pilot in his youth, volunteered for military service in the Luftwaffe of the Third Reich in 1937. Following flight training he was posted to Jagdgeschwader 2 "Richthofen" (JG 2—2nd Fighter Wing) in 1939. He fought in the Battle of France and claimed his first aerial victory in that campaign on 13 June 1940. Mayer was appointed Staffelkapitän (squadron leader) of the 7. Staffel (7th squadron) of JG 2 "Richthofen" in June 1941. Two months later, following his 21st aerial victory, he received the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross on 1 August 1941. He claimed 16 further victories and was awarded the German Cross in Gold on 16 July 1942. In November 1942, Mayer was appointed Gruppenkommandeur (group commander) of the III. Gruppe (3rd group) of JG 2 "Richthofen". Mayer claimed his first victories over United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) four-engine bombers when he shot down two B-17 Flying Fortresses and a B-24 Liberator on 23 November 1942. Together with fellow fighter ace Georg-Peter Eder, Mayer developed the head-on attack as the most effective tactic against the Allied daylight heavy combat box bomber formations. He received the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves on 16 April 1943 after 63 victories. On 1 July 1943, he replaced Walter Oesau as Geschwaderkommodore (Wing Commander) of JG 2 "Richthofen". He claimed his 90th victory on 31 December 1943 and on 5 February 1944 became the first pilot on the Channel Front to reach 100 victories. Mayer was killed in action on 2 March 1944 while leading an attack on a USAAF bomber formation; he was shot down by P-47 Thunderbolt escort fighters near Montmédy, France. He was posthumously awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords that day.

A.K.A. Ken                Making Modeling Great Again

  • Member since
    October 2009
  • From: Oil City, PA
Posted by greentracker98 on Sunday, January 11, 2015 3:23 AM
 My Second Ace  Lieutenant Colonel Robert Samuel Johnson (February 21, 1920 – December 27, 1998) was a USAAF fighter pilot during World War II. He is credited with scoring 27 victories during the conflict flying a Republic P-47 Thunderbolt. Robert S. Johnson was the first USAAF fighter pilot in the European theater to surpass Eddie Rickenbacker's World War I score of 26 victories. He finished his combat tour with 27 kills, was later credited by the Eighth Air Force claims board with a 28th victory when a "probable" was reassessed as a "destroyed", then reduced back to 27 when a post-war review discovered that the Eighth Air Force had inadvertently switched credits for a kill he made with a double kill made by a fellow 56th Fighter Group pilot, Ralph A. Johnson, on November 26, 1943, a day when Robert Johnson aborted the mission after takeoff. (Their Army serial numbers were also nearly identical, O-662216 and O-662217.) One of the 56th's worst setbacks occurred on June 26, 1943, when 48 P-47Cs left a forward operating base at RAF Manston late in the afternoon to provide escort for B-17 Flying Fortress bombers returning from a mission against Villacoublay airfield in the Paris suburbs. As the P-47s approached the rendezvous point near Forges-les-Eaux, they were jumped from above and behind by 16 Focke-Wulf Fw 190s of II Gruppe, JG 26. The first pass scattered the Thunderbolts, and Johnson's aircraft, flying at the rear of the 61st Squadron's formation, was seriously damaged by a 20 mm shell that exploded in his cockpit and ruptured his hydraulic system. Burned and partially blinded by hydraulic fluid, Johnson tried to bail out, but his parachute snagged and the canopy would only open about 3 inches and to make matters worse, the canopy was shattered . After pulling out of an uncontrolled spin and with the fire amazingly going out on its own, Johnson headed for the English Channel, but was intercepted by a single Fw 190. Unable to fight back, he maneuvered while under a series of attacks, and although sustaining further heavy damage from 7.92mm, managed to survive until the German ran out of ammunition. The German rocked his wings to salute Johnson, then turned back. His opponent was likely the commander of III/JG 2, Oberst Egon Mayer.[2] [N 1]After landing, Johnson tried to count the bullet holes in his airplane, but gave up after the tally passed 200 - without even moving around the craft Johnson made it back to land at Manston and suffered shrapnel wounds and minor burns to his face, hands, and legs, and was awarded the Purple Heart. He resumed flying missions on July 1. After the war, Johnson became the chief test pilot for Republic Aviation, maker of the P-47, where he worked as an engineering executive for 18 years, and served as National President of the Air Force Association from 1949–1951. He remained a member of the US Air Force Reserve, visiting Air Force bases in South Korea in December 1951, and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel. In 1964 Johnson became an insurance executive in Lake Wylie, South Carolina. The terminal building at Lawton-Fort Sill Regional Airport, in his birthplace, Lawton, Oklahoma, is named in his memory. A painting of Johnson's final mission was commissioned by the Oklahoma State Senate Historical Preservation Fund, Inc. in 2000 and hangs in the Oklahoma State Senate conference room on the fourth floor of the Oklahoma State Capitol. Johnson collaborated with aviation author Martin Caidin to write his autobiographical story of the 56th Fighter Group, Thunderbolt!, in 1958.

A.K.A. Ken                Making Modeling Great Again

  • Member since
    September 2007
  • From: Finland funland
Posted by Trabi on Thursday, January 15, 2015 3:24 PM

Jorma "Zamba" Sarvanto was the top scoring ace during the Finnish/Russian Winter War between the 30th November 1939 and the 13th March 1940. He scored a total of 13 victories using the Bristol Mercury powered Fokker D.XXI.

6th of January 1940 he shot down six DB-3 bombers in four minutes.

http://www.sci.fi/~fta/finace92.htm

Everstiluutnantti Överstelöjtnant (Lieutenant Colonel) Jorma Kalevi Sarvanto

Sarvanto was to become the top scoring Finnish ace of the Winter War with 13 victories. During the Continuation War he downed four more aircraft with Brewster Buffaloes, bringing his total score to 17. He flew a total of 255 combat missions during World War II.

Jorma Kalevi Sarvanto ended the war with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel as Commander of the Flight School in Kauhava where he served until 1954. From 1954 to 1960 he served as the Finnish military attaché in London.

Battle Honours:

Cross of Liberty, 2nd Class, with swords, of the order of the cross of liberty

Cross of Liberty, 3rd Class, with swords, of the order of the cross of liberty

Commander of the Order of the White Rose of Finland

Order of the German Eagle 3rd Class, with swords

Luftwaffe’s pilot badge honoris causa.

 

http://20thcenturybattles.com/2013/06/14/jorma-kalevi-sarvanto-zamba-and-the-bomber-interception-tactics-of-the-finnish-air-force-during-the-winter-war-of-1939/

http://www.sci.fi/~fta/finace26.htm

"Space may be the final frontier, but it´s made in Hollywood basement." RHCP, Californication

  • Member since
    October 2009
  • From: Oil City, PA
Posted by greentracker98 on Friday, January 16, 2015 5:18 PM

Trabi

Jorma "Zamba" Sarvanto was the top scoring ace during the Finnish/Russian Winter War between the 30th November 1939 and the 13th March 1940. He scored a total of 13 victories using the Bristol Mercury powered Fokker D.XXI.

6th of January 1940 he shot down six DB-3 bombers in four minutes.

http://www.sci.fi/~fta/finace92.htm

Everstiluutnantti Överstelöjtnant (Lieutenant Colonel) Jorma Kalevi Sarvanto

Sarvanto was to become the top scoring Finnish ace of the Winter War with 13 victories. During the Continuation War he downed four more aircraft with Brewster Buffaloes, bringing his total score to 17. He flew a total of 255 combat missions during World War II.

Jorma Kalevi Sarvanto ended the war with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel as Commander of the Flight School in Kauhava where he served until 1954. From 1954 to 1960 he served as the Finnish military attaché in London.

Battle Honours:

Cross of Liberty, 2nd Class, with swords, of the order of the cross of liberty

Cross of Liberty, 3rd Class, with swords, of the order of the cross of liberty

Commander of the Order of the White Rose of Finland

Order of the German Eagle 3rd Class, with swords

Luftwaffe’s pilot badge honoris causa.

 

http://20thcenturybattles.com/2013/06/14/jorma-kalevi-sarvanto-zamba-and-the-bomber-interception-tactics-of-the-finnish-air-force-during-the-winter-war-of-1939/

http://www.sci.fi/~fta/finace26.htm

What country is Sarvanto from? And what figure and airplane are you doing Trabi? Is he attached with Germany? I ask because of the swastika on the airplane?

I think its good to be doing something from a lesser known part of World War 2. Since I'm nor familair with this, I think there are others as well who don't know.

A.K.A. Ken                Making Modeling Great Again

  • Member since
    September 2007
  • From: Finland funland
Posted by Trabi on Saturday, January 17, 2015 1:24 PM

Ah, sorry. Finland. Finnish Air Force WW II. Not attached with Germany.

Plane is Fokker D.XXI. Kit is mady by Pioneer 2/Frogg, 1/72. Figure is 1/72 either sitting in a plane or standing besides it, haven´t decided yet. I have first to go to see real flight suit in the museum nearby.

"Space may be the final frontier, but it´s made in Hollywood basement." RHCP, Californication

  • Member since
    October 2009
  • From: Oil City, PA
Posted by greentracker98 on Sunday, January 18, 2015 1:05 AM
Trabi

Ah, sorry. Finland. Finnish Air Force WW II. Not attached with Germany.

Plane is Fokker D.XXI. Kit is mady by Pioneer 2/Frogg, 1/72. Figure is 1/72 either sitting in a plane or standing besides it, haven´t decided yet. I have first to go to see real flight suit in the museum nearby.

Okay, Thanks. I'll update your Info tomorrow. and fix this post. I know it's going to tie it right in with everything above. I guess not. I posted it and it looks pretty good.

A.K.A. Ken                Making Modeling Great Again

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Sunday, January 18, 2015 1:57 AM

Ken,

The Finish had those markings before Hitler used them and put them at an angle.

  • Member since
    October 2009
  • From: Oil City, PA
Posted by greentracker98 on Sunday, January 18, 2015 11:58 PM
modelcrazy

Ken,

The Finish had those markings before Hitler used them and put them at an angle.

Oh Okay, I didn't know that

A.K.A. Ken                Making Modeling Great Again

  • Member since
    October 2009
  • From: Oil City, PA
Posted by greentracker98 on Sunday, January 18, 2015 11:59 PM
Okay Everyone Go to it

A.K.A. Ken                Making Modeling Great Again

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by BrandonD on Tuesday, January 20, 2015 10:22 PM

Adolf Galant was born March 19, 1912 and flew for the German Luftwaffe in WWII. In his career as a pilot, he flew more than 700 combat missions and shot down 104 Allied aircraft. As he didn't fly against the Russians, his victories were exclusively against the Western Allies.

After General der Jagdflieger Werner Mörders was killed in 1941, Galland succeeded him, and was forbidden to fly combat missions until after he was relieved of his command. From March-May 1945, he flew ME-262 jets, where he shot down several B-26 bombers.

I wanted to build Galland's Bf-109 E-4 circa 1940 when he was the commander of JG26. Last year I read the book JG 26: Top Guns of the Luftwaffe, for which Galland wrote the foreword. It was a fascinating look at the air war front he Luftwaffe perspective.

 -BD-

  • Member since
    October 2013
Posted by ajd3530 on Wednesday, January 21, 2015 12:43 AM
Fun fact: The Latvian Air Force also used the swastika (maroon swastika in a white circle) as their roundel until they were more or less annexed by the Soviets in '39-40.

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