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The Race Into Space GB, October 2018 - July 2019

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  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 11:42 PM

Life stepped in this evening, so no bench-time. But, I found time to do research. I followed Gary’s advice and looked for jeeps in The Right Stuff. They showed two, shown below.

Doing this establishee the color. I could also see a little of the markings, very little. I will wing it for the latter. This is hollywood so, big whoop.

 

 

Also, I did more work on the frame yesterday and my comment about things going well turned to the worse. The frame as it was designed has a terrible fit with the tub. The tub rides high from front to back and it twists from side to side. A few hours of cutting here and cutting there has it looking much better. 

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, May 29, 2019 6:54 AM

Bakster>  Hey, great!  The jeep is a perfect vehicle for inclusion, for it's actually historical.

This is a great video on the history of the X-1 project, and if you skip to ~43:00 minutes in you will see the X-1 being towed back to the base by a jeep, with Yeager riding on the wing.  So the movie got that right!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jVK3DDmrU8

Also, earlier you see scenes of the X-1 being tested on the ground and where they hook the hoses up for fueling.  Lots of good information in this.  Recommended!

I also intend to grab a copy of the "Apollo 11" documentary.  Can't miss that!

Gary

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, May 29, 2019 8:47 AM

GAF
This is a great video on the history of the X-1 project, and if you skip to ~43:00 minutes in you will see the X-1 being towed back to the base by a jeep, with Yeager riding on the wing.  So the movie got that right!

Hey Gary--thanks... I will view the video tonight.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, May 29, 2019 8:42 PM

Bakster: Cool idea with the Jeep. Sorry to hear you're having trouble with her. Good luck, sounds like you've got it under control.

 

I'm still filling and sanding away on the astronaut... Sad

 

PS: Not sure there's anywhere on a US base you wouldn't see Jeeps. There was a rumour going around with the Germans during the Second World War that you saw so many Jeeps because every G.I. when he signed up got his own Jeep! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Thursday, May 30, 2019 8:06 AM

Great video Gary.

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, May 30, 2019 8:42 AM

Gamera>  I am a modeler and I'm sanding a seam! Sandy, sandy seam.  Sandy, sandy seam...  Big Smile

The eternal battle.

Steve>  Yes, that was a nice video.  Had a lot of scenes I had not viewed before.  Some good ones for the ground tests.

I don't have much to report, except that I've masked the Titan II booster and painted the black and white stripes.  I need to do some touch-up on that.  Also, the Vostok seams were sanded down and hit with a black base, followed up by a grey color that I hope is close to the "greyish-green" I have seen called out.  It's drying.  Earlier, I had given the engine base a coat of metallic silver.  She's coming along nicely.  I'll get some images up later today.

Gary  

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, May 30, 2019 5:38 PM

Comrades and Fellow Cosmonauts!

The Vostok approaches final assembly as the date for launch nears!  Our engineers report that all systems are operational and progress towards our impending journey to the stars proceeds with all speed!

I got most of the seams sanded down, then this morning (while still cool) sprayed a base coat of black on the main rocket body.  After drying, I hit it with a coat of "Smoke Grey", which is close to the "Euro 1 Gray" that I've read is close to the original color.  Some images show the rocket as "green", close to OD, but that is apparently a mistake.  It's actually more of a "greyish-green" color, and depending on the lighting and the film used, it can appear green.  I've tried to get as close to this as I can, but as you can see in the following images the lighting plays a big part.  Also, I managed to dig up the pin I was looking for which will be incorporated into the base!  No Order of Lenin yet!  Big Smile

This image with flash makes the rocket look too grey.

This image gets a bit closer to the color with a lamp off to the side.

This one without lighting except from the window probably gets closer to the actual color.

That's all for now.  Fins, retro-rockets and attachments still to be glued.  No decals, so that's not a worry!

Gary

Today In Glorious Russian Space History!

1954 May 30 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur. Launch Vehicle: R-7.

  • Go-ahead for R-7 ICBM by designers council - . Nation: Russia. Council of Chief designers approval to proceed with development of R-7.

1955 May 30 - .

  • Korolev rehabilitated. - . Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Korolev. Seventeen years after his arrest, and after ten years as head of the Soviet rocketry program, Korolev's arrest and imprisonment during Stalin's purges are rescinded..

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, May 30, 2019 5:55 PM

Vladimir Gaf, your rocket reins supreme. It is a true testament to the cause of space exploration.

It looks really cool, Gary. It is an awesome looking rocket that they had. I love the music, and the star is a nice touch. Btw, the X-1 video is really good. I watched half of it thus far and got some good images of the rocket plumes.  Thanks for that. I really enjoyed it and I learned a lot about X-1.

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Thursday, May 30, 2019 6:06 PM

My exteme thanks, Commissar Bakster!

Glad you like!  The Vostok is actually not a bad model fit wise.  Not very complex, and simple to assemble.  I may pick up another one to do the Sputnik version.  Smile

I too enjoyed the video, and it showed me some scenes I had not viewed before.  Happy you found it useful!

Should have another update later tonight on the American boosters.  Got some paint on the Titan II today, though it needs some touch-up.

Gary

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, May 31, 2019 10:26 AM

Gary: Looks awesome to me!!! 

 

Yeap, call me Sandy now... 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, May 31, 2019 1:54 PM

I found this website that explains military markings on jeeps. It may be a little useful to me.

https://blog.kaiserwillys.com/military-jeep-markings?doing_wp_cron=1559327513.5628070831298828125000

Work continues on the jeep/trailer. All the parts are cleaned up and what made sense to glue have been glued. Over lunch I picked up some paint and all systems are moving towards paint. Before I do though, I need to fabricate the compressor. That is my goal for this weekend. If all goes well, I might even start paint. For sure, I will be spraying it by next week.

Thus far, this has been a fun little side project. I had the fit issues mentioned, but everthing else has been going together very nicely. It's not a bad little kit.

And......

 

 

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, June 01, 2019 8:49 PM

Not much to report.  Detailing continues on the AMT Man In Space boosters, with some very small stripes being applied to the Titan II.  Here's an image of what they look like (though it's a couple of days old).

The Vostok is having seams filled with super glue (which seems to be melting the paint).  Since they're going to be sanded down, that shouldn't be a problem.  Trying to figure out some painting details from online photos, which is sometimes problematic.

Also, I need to make a hatch for the Vostok spacecraft as the original was merely a part of the shroud on top of the rocket and not a separate piece.

Gary

Today In Space History:

1955 June 1 - .

  • NERVA project begins. - . Nation: USA. Program: NERVA.

    NACA Lewis Laboratory presented ARDC with results of air-breathing nuclear propulsion systems for manned applications, leading to AEC-AF Pluto project, and also initiated comparison of nuclear rocket with chemical systems for ICBM, a concept of use to Rover program.


1969 June 1 - . Launch Vehicle: N1.

  • Soviet lunar plans - . Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Mishin. Program: Lunar L3, Lunar L1. Spacecraft: LK, Soyuz 7K-L1A.

    Despite having no stand testing of the N1 first stage, Mishin still expected the first Soviet lunar landing to take place by the end of 1970. He began pushing Kamanin to assign L3 flight crews for the missions. Mishin's staff did not believe he had the necessary discipline to pull it off, but supported him out of solidarity. Mishin accepted the resolution to use 5L to conduct a lunar flyby. The payload consisted of the L3-S. This spacecraft used the new unified guidance system developed for the LOK by NIIAP, replacing the 7K-L1 guidance system, and functional rocket stages G and D, plus the payload bay of the LK. The only functional spacecraft system was the SAS abort tower. Although unthinkable in Korolev's time, lunar launch window constraints meant the launch had to be made at precisely 23:18 on 3 June 1969.


1970 June 1 - . 19:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC31. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz 11A511.

  • Soyuz 9 - . Call Sign: Sokol (Falcon ). Crew: Nikolayev, Sevastyanov. Backup Crew: Filipchenko, Grechko. Support Crew: Lazarev, Yazdovsky. Payload: Soyuz 7K-OK s/n 17. Mass: 6,590 kg (14,520 lb). Nation: Russia. Related Persons: Filipchenko, Grechko, Lazarev, Nikolayev, Sevastyanov, Yazdovsky. Agency: MOM. Program: Soyuz. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Soyuz 9. Spacecraft Bus: Soyuz. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK. Duration: 17.71 days. Decay Date: 1970-06-19 . USAF Sat Cat: 4407 . COSPAR: 1970-041A. Apogee: 227 km (141 mi). Perigee: 176 km (109 mi). Inclination: 51.60 deg. Period: 88.50 min. Manned flight endurance test. Medico-biological, scientific and technical studies and experiments in prolonged orbital flight. Inconclusive results due to slow sun-oriented rotation of spacecraft to conserve fuel producing motion sickness in cosmonauts.

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Saturday, June 01, 2019 8:59 PM

Here's some more NASA PR releases from the MSFC.  The first is a list of corporations that helped with contributions to

the rocket center.  So many that don't exist anymore.

The second is a list of people on the Science Advisory Committee.  Some interesting individuals on there.  Walter Cronkite?

Gary

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 02, 2019 12:10 PM

Below is the gist of what I came up with. I scavenged parts from a ground crew set. Cutting here, cutting there, and that's that. There will be decal gauges in the opening amongst other markings around the assembly. Right of that opening I will make a port for the hose to connect to. I am still struggling with what to use as a hose. I have a certain look and scale that I am shooting for, and the problem eludes me. I still have ideas to try though, and I'll see where it leads me.

Bits and pieces are washed and drying. Painting is next but probably not today.

End of update. 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Sunday, June 02, 2019 3:48 PM

Bakster,

If I'm thinkg of the right hose, the large G wound guitar or bass string may work for what your looking for, but not sure if is to scale.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 02, 2019 4:24 PM

Hey Steve, that is an excellent thought. That could simulate a hose very nicely. Unfortunately, the scale is off. I am shooting for something larger, like in the movie. You can see in the image below that the hose is about the same diameter of the planes rims. That is about 1/4” diameter in our world.

I had purchased something called corrugated spiral wrap, or loom. It is used to protect wiring and it closely mimics that type of hose. The issue is that it is somewhat out of scale, the bigger issue is that it is stiff. Getting it to drape correctly is not working. Maybe with heat I can soften the material, but that will be a last resort. For now, I am looking for something better, possibly scatch building one out of styrene. If I can soften the tubing and get the bends that I want, I might be able to simulate the rest. I just picked up some styrene tubing and I will see if I can bend it to the shape I want, without melting it.

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Sunday, June 02, 2019 4:34 PM

Bakster>  The only thing I can think of off the top of my head are "bendy straws".  Those are the plastic (or paper) straws with a flexible part you can bend to make it easier to use.  The flexible sections are short, but you could probably use a few to connect together with glue or tape to get the desired length.  Just another suggestion.

Example:

https://www.amazon.com/ALINK-Flexible-Plastic-Drinking-Disposable/dp/B071WSMJXT/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_201_t_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=AGVBC980XKWMR0PSDNBC

You can probably get them cheaper than at Amazon though.

Gary (Scrounger of Parts)

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Sunday, June 02, 2019 4:56 PM

Maybe a bendable straw?

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 02, 2019 5:43 PM

modelcrazy

Maybe a bendable straw?

 

There is something going on with this website because my posts keep dumping. Surprisingly, the first one went through so, hopefully, I am not duplicating this.

Gary and Steve, you may have hit on the best solution yet! Using a straw hadn’t occurred to me. I think those bendy areas look closer to the real thing than the corrugated loom I bought. What I like too is that you can stretch them, and they are very pose-able. Yeah I’d have to splice them, but it shouldn't be that difficult.

I will look into this! You guys ROCK!

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 02, 2019 7:58 PM

Bakster
I will look into this! You guys ROCK!

Straws are ordered, giddyup.

Yes

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, June 03, 2019 7:21 AM

Bakster>  Ordered?  I usually just pop down to the grocery store for mine.  Still, good luck with making them work!  Some appropriate connections and paint and they'll probably look great!

I'm about to do touch-up spray on the Vostok, then I can finish detailing.  Good progress overall.

Gary

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, June 03, 2019 7:44 AM

GAF

Bakster>  Ordered?  I usually just pop down to the grocery store for mine.  Still, good luck with making them work!  Some appropriate connections and paint and they'll probably look great!

The odds that a local store will have the one I selected is extremely slim, and my time looking is worth more than the postage to have it shipped. I picked one off amazon specifically for its diameter and look. I guess I am funny that way. If I am going to put all the effort into something like I am, I don’t like settling. If I did like settling, this project would have been done months ago. Lol.

Thanks again for the help.

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, June 03, 2019 8:11 AM

Bakster> If you can find what you need online without shopping, then it's a real time saver.  And you can sip your favorite beverage while working!  Big Smile

I've had a setback this morning.  The touch-up paint job didn't work well on the main booster stage of the Vostok, and it crinkled badly in a large area.  Not sure what happened, as the boosters and upper part worked fine!  Angry

I can't sand this down, so its been dropped into a bath of Purple Power to strip the paint.  One step forward, two steps back...

The Committee members are not going to be happy!

Gary

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, June 03, 2019 9:05 AM

GAF
Bakster> If you can find what you need online without shopping, then it's a real time saver.  And you can sip your favorite beverage while working!

Amen to that, Vladimir. Funny thing... I recently bought some Vodka. Coincidence? Probably not. Confused

 

GAF
've had a setback this morning.  The touch-up paint job didn't work well on the main booster stage of the Vostok, and it crinkled badly in a large area.  Not sure what happened, as the boosters and upper part worked fine!  I can't sand this down, so its been dropped into a bath of Purple Power to strip the paint.  One step forward, two steps back...

That is the worst-case scenario. I hate stripping paint, I hate do-overs. You have my empathy, Vladimir GAF. Indeed--the bureau shall be displeased. 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, June 03, 2019 8:52 PM

Gary: Ouch! Good luck with the repaint!

Bakster: Sounds cool! Great advice from the guys on using the bendy straw!

 

I got my issue of FSM today. And a guy is building the same astronaut that I am. And he covered the same landing leg that I'm sanding the heck out of with foil! So the blazes with sanding it, I'm covering mine with foil too!!!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, June 03, 2019 9:32 PM

Gamera>  Thanks!  The paint removal is ongoing, and I'm slowly scrubbing it off.  Should be done tomorrow with any luck.

And the legs were normally covered in foil, so that takes care of that!  Big Smile

Besides removing paint, I've attached some small parts to the upper stage of the Vostok, done some painting on the engines and continued applying thin white stripes on the Titan II.  Things are coming along despite the fouled up paint.

Gentlemen, we have 47 days left in the mission.  If you haven't started your project, I would seriously consider getting around to it.

Gary

Today In Space History:

1965 June 3 - . 15:16 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC19. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan II GLV.

  • Gemini 4 - . Call Sign: American Eagle / Little Eva. Crew: McDivitt, White. Backup Crew: Borman, Lovell. Payload: Gemini SC4. Mass: 3,574 kg (7,879 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Borman, Lovell, McDivitt, White. Agency: NASA Houston. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Gemini 4. Spacecraft: Gemini. Duration: 4.08 days. Decay Date: 1965-06-07 . USAF Sat Cat: 1390 . COSPAR: 1965-043A. Apogee: 281 km (174 mi). Perigee: 162 km (100 mi). Inclination: 32.50 deg. Period: 88.80 min.

    The second manned and first long-duration mission in the Gemini program. Major objectives of the four-day mission were demonstrating and evaluating the performance of spacecraft systems in a long-duration flight and evaluating effects on the crew of prolonged exposure to the space environment. Secondary objectives included demonstrating extravehicular activity (EVA) in space, conducting stationkeeping and rendezvous maneuvers with the second stage of the launch vehicle, performing significant in-plane and out-of-plane maneuvers, demonstrating the ability of the orbit attitude and maneuver system (OAMS) to back up the retrorockets, and executing 11 experiments. The stationkeeping exercise was terminated at the end of the first revolution because most of the OAMS propellant allocated for the exercise had been used; further efforts would jeopardize primary mission objectives and could mean the cancellation of several secondary objectives. No rendezvous was attempted. The only other major problem to mar the mission was the inadvertent alteration of the computer memory during the 48th revolution in an attempt to correct an apparent malfunction. This made the planned computer-controlled reentry impossible and required an open-loop ballistic reentry. All other mission objectives were met. The flight crew began preparing for EVA immediately after terminating the stationkeeping exercise. Although preparations went smoothly, McDivitt decided to delay EVA for one revolution, both because of the high level of activity required and because deletion of the rendezvous attempt reduced the tightness of the schedule. Ground control approved the decision. The spacecraft hatch was opened at 4 hours 18 minutes into the flight and White exited 12 minutes later, using a hand-held maneuvering gun. White reentered the spacecraft 20 minutes after leaving it. The hatch was closed at 4 hours 54 minutes ground elapsed time. Drifting flight was maintained for the next two and one-half days to conserve propellant. The spacecraft landed in the Atlantic Ocean about 725 km east of Cape Kennedy - some 65 km from its nominal landing point. The crew boarded a helicopter 34 minutes after landing and was transported to the prime recovery ship, the aircraft carrier Wasp. Spacecraft recovery was completed at 2:28 p.m., a little more than 100 hours after Gemini 4 had been launched. Gemini 4 was the first mission to be controlled from the mission control center in Houston.

    The space walk was hurriedly included after the Russian first in Voskhod 2. White seemed to have a lot more fun than Leonov and McDivitt took the pictures that came to symbolize man in space. With this flight the US finally started to match Russian flight durations.


1966 June 3 - . 13:39 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC19. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan II GLV.

  • Gemini 9 - . Call Sign: Gemini 9. Crew: Cernan, Stafford. Backup Crew: Aldrin, Lovell. Payload: Gemini SC9. Mass: 3,668 kg (8,086 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Aldrin, Cernan, Lovell, Stafford. Agency: NASA Houston. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Gemini 9. Spacecraft: Gemini. Duration: 3.01 days. Decay Date: 1966-06-06 . USAF Sat Cat: 2191 . COSPAR: 1966-047A. Apogee: 272 km (169 mi). Perigee: 269 km (167 mi). Inclination: 28.80 deg. Period: 89.90 min.

    At the first launch attempt, while the crew waited buttoned up in the spacecraft on the pad, their Agena docking target field blew up on the way to orbit. NASA decided to use an Atlas to launch an Agena docking collar only. This was called the Augmented Target Docking Adapter. Ths was successfully launched and the Gemini succeeded in rendezvousing with it. However, the ATDA shroud had not completely separated, thus making docking impossible. However three different types of rendezvous were tested with the ATDA. Cernan began his EVA, which was to include flight with a USAF MMU rocket pack but the Gemini suit could not handle heat load of the astronaut's exertions. Cernan's faceplate fogs up, forcing him to blindly grope back into the Gemini hatch after only two hours.

    Seventh manned and third rendezvous mission of the Gemini program. Major objectives of the mission were to rendezvous and dock with the augmented target docking adapter (ATDA) and to conduct extravehicular activities (EVA). These objectives were only partially met. After successfully achieving rendezvous during the third revolution - a secondary objective - the crew discovered that the ATDA shroud had failed to separate, precluding docking - a primary objective - as well as docking practice - another secondary objective. The crew was able, however, to achieve other secondary objectives: an equi-period rendezvous, using onboard optical techniques and completed at 6 hours 36 minutes ground elapsed time; and a rendezvous from above, simulating the rendezvous of an Apollo command module with a lunar module in a lower orbit (completed at 21 hours 42 minutes ground elapsed time). Final separation maneuver was performed at 22 hours 59 minutes after liftoff. EVA was postponed because of crew fatigue, and the second day was given over to experiments. The hatch was opened for EVA at 49 hours 23 minutes ground elapsed time. EVA was successful, but one secondary objective - evaluation of the astronaut maneuvering unit (AMU) - was not achieved because Cernan's visor began fogging. The extravehicular life support system apparently became overloaded with moisture when Cernan had to work harder than anticipated to prepare the AMU for donning. Cernan reentered the spacecraft, and the hatch was closed at 51 hours 28 minutes into the flight. The rest of the third day was spent on experiments.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, June 03, 2019 10:28 PM

Gary: Good to hear the paint removal is going well.

 

I'm now a bit confused. I thought about painting the astronaut in greyscale as if seen on a black & white TV. Now I'm wondering if I should go ahead and try to do him in colour. Any suggestions guys???

 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Monday, June 03, 2019 10:34 PM

I'd go color.

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, June 03, 2019 10:52 PM

I concur.  Go with color, then photograph him in black & white.  Wink

Gary

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Tuesday, June 04, 2019 8:49 AM

GAF

I concur.  Go with color, then photograph him in black & white.  Wink

Gary

 

Then get some tricolor eyeglasses to add color back in. It'd be just like the old days. Yes Beer 

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