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German Armor GB 2019-2020

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  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, January 8, 2019 6:20 PM

Real G & Robert: Those look great guys!

TigerII: Cool, real classic kit there!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Wednesday, January 9, 2019 6:43 AM

Nice looking tracks there G, and i agree, they do look like Dragon tracks. I can't find MK stuff in the UK but i might haveto try and find those as i am still outstandinga couple of sets of 251 tracks.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Academy 1/35th Warrior FV511

  • Member since
    January 2019
Posted by Edwin on Wednesday, January 9, 2019 9:47 AM

Real G

Looking forward to this build of yours. I built exact same kit more than 30 years ago, and remember having (8) tons of fun!

All the best to your buildYes 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Wednesday, January 9, 2019 12:41 PM

Edwin - Yeah, I too built the 8-ton halftrack as a wee lad back in 1978 or so!  Like you, I had a blast building it.  Big Smile

Bish - I get Modelkasten tracks from online retailers in Japan.  We rarely see any AM tracks here at my LHS.  Unfortunately you Brits get taxed to death when you buy stuff from overseas.  Sad

Gamera - I'll be tackling this kit right after I get the M3 Stuart done.  Yes

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Wednesday, January 9, 2019 2:30 PM

Real G

Edwin - Yeah, I too built the 8-ton halftrack as a wee lad back in 1978 or so!  Like you, I had a blast building it.  Big Smile

Bish - I get Modelkasten tracks from online retailers in Japan.  We rarely see any AM tracks here at my LHS.  Unfortunately you Brits get taxed to death when you buy stuff from overseas.  Sad

Gamera - I'll be tackling this kit right after I get the M3 Stuart done.  Yes

 

I have found them on e-bay from Australia.

The tax can be hit and miss, and it tends to be stuff i get from Japan that gets hit, but its normally only 2 or 3 quid, its the charge the post office adds that hurts more.

I'll check the Japanese sellers, thanks for the heads up.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Academy 1/35th Warrior FV511

  • Member since
    September 2017
  • From: Netherlands
Posted by Sailing_Dutchman on Thursday, January 10, 2019 12:46 PM

Good work everyone. Sorry I have not been active more, but I have been having trouble with logging in and with my internet connection. I will begin my build as soon as I get a handle on my builds for the SSGB and the modern armor GB.

   

  • Member since
    October 2006
  • From: Tucson, AZ
Posted by Archangel Shooter on Friday, January 11, 2019 1:31 PM

Got the main body put together and primed using Tamiya grey primer out of the can. I find it's much easier and faster to prime from a can than messing with a spray brush and mixing primer/thinner and the clean up afterwards.  I need to add some filler in a few spots and make a muffler exhaust pipe since it was damaged. No separate track links for this kit, stucked using the kit vinyl tracks.  

 Your image is loading...

 On the bench: So many hanger queens.

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, January 13, 2019 6:55 PM

Ohhhhhhhh, looks great!!!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by PFJN on Sunday, January 13, 2019 8:48 PM

Hi,

I recently picked up some Testors washes at a local craft store and decided to give them a try on my tank build.  This build (and another that I am currently working on for the Race Into Space group build are my first forays into messing around with washes so it has been a bit of a learning experience.  In particular, I first tried using a dark gray wash, which went on fairly thinly and looked pretty good, but decided to try a darker black wash over it. 

I suspect that my forst wash may not have been mixed well enough, because my black wash went on very darkly, which I let set for a short period before lightly wiping it off.  In addition, afterwards I grabbed a wrong bottle and inadvertantly gave e verything a light coat of thinner instead of Future.

Overall that wasn't really a bad thing, as it gave me a chance to try and "lighten up" a few spots where I didn't get all the black wash cleaned up.

Anyway, below are two images of my build still in progress, after there washes and with a coat of Future.  Hopefully tommorrow (or the next day) I may be able to try and add the decals.  I have a new bottle of Micro Set and Miro Sol to use on them, and I am interested to see if they can help ensure that the decals set down nicely over the small rivets and other surface detail Smile.

Regards

PF

Left

Right

PS. The figure in the background is a 3D printed Maj Healey.  He's a 1/60 scale 3D printed astronaut that I printed for my Race into Space group build entry.

1st Group BuildSP

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by PFJN on Tuesday, January 15, 2019 8:09 PM

Hi,

I've started adding the decals, but am still in the process of trying to get them to lay flat with microsol.

PF

Decals

1st Group BuildSP

  • Member since
    October 2006
  • From: Tucson, AZ
Posted by Archangel Shooter on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 4:06 AM

She's looking good.

 Your image is loading...

 On the bench: So many hanger queens.

 

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 4:28 AM

Thats come on nicely PF.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Academy 1/35th Warrior FV511

  • Member since
    August 2015
  • From: the redlands Fl
Posted by crown r n7 on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 8:53 AM

I have been watching this GB with interest I would like to enter a tamiya king tiger in 1/35th scale.

friulmodel tracks.

still have a few GB's to start and finish. I have a year lol ...

  

Nick.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 11:47 AM

PF: I'd try to give you some advice but I'm probably the worst guy to ask about washes. I will tell you though I generally use 'pin' washes these days where you add a little bit around details with a small brush instead of laying it over the whole model.

She looks good though, seems like in the end it worked out for you. Yes

 

Nick: Ohhhhhh, looks cool! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by PFJN on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 12:23 PM

Gamera

PF: I'd try to give you some advice but I'm probably the worst guy to ask about washes. I will tell you though I generally use 'pin' washes these days where you add a little bit around details with a small brush instead of laying it over the whole model.

She looks good though, seems like in the end it worked out for you. Yes

...

Cool,

Thanks for the suggestions.  This build has really been a lot of experiementation for me so far Stick out tongue

PF

PS.  Other than repainting the gun barrels and adding a top coat of flat clear paint, I think I am almost down with my first ever completed group build (I have another "Race to Space" entry that is close to complete too Smile)

Prof

I'm kind of happy how the various washes and stuff helped mute out the colors that I used and kind of softened the edges of the different color patches.

1st Group BuildSP

  • Member since
    June 2004
  • From: East Stroudsburg, PA
Posted by TigerII on Thursday, January 17, 2019 2:33 PM

I'm glad that YOU are happy with how your kit came out. I like using pin washes too, but sometimes you have to do a complete model wash to downplay colors that stand out too much. I use a darkened base paint wash. The good thing I like about those kind of washes is that when done right they can double as pin washes for they get into those nooks, crannies and slots.

Achtung Panzer! Colonel General Heinz Guderian
  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, January 17, 2019 4:56 PM

PF: Looks good! I'd agree that everything worked out really well.

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by PFJN on Thursday, January 17, 2019 8:56 PM

Hi,

I couldn't find my flat clear spray paint today, but I did get a chance to brush on some Micro-Flat instead.  So I think I am going to call this build pretty muchly done.  It was a really fascinating learning experience, not just in playing around with different paints and such, but also in learning a bit more about WWI and early armored land vehicles.

Here are two close ups that I tkk with my digital camera, instead of my cell phone.  I guess I should have put something in frame to give the images a sense of scale because looking at them now it doesn't really convey how small the kit is at 1/72 scale (the overall length is only about 4.75in/121mm). Stick out tongue

Right

Left

[you can click the images for a close up view]

1st Group BuildSP

  • Member since
    August 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Thursday, January 17, 2019 9:04 PM
Wow that is tiny PF and she turned out great.

Clint

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Friday, January 18, 2019 12:13 AM

PFJN,

That turned out great!

Most people have not a clue how hard it was to operate a WW I tank.  There was a mock-up of a Mk.IV interior at the Tank Museum in Bovington, where visitors were invited to take up stations and try to start the simulated engine.  Detailed instructions were given, but it noted that THREE people were needed to get it running.  Since I was with only one friend, we were unable to get the engine turned over, despite mad efforts to work all the controls!  Two guys were needed just to work the transmission, and with no intercom in a hot, lurching metal box with an exposed engine in the middle, one can imagine how hard it was to effectively communicate and coordinate actions.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, January 18, 2019 8:17 AM

PF: Yeah, she looks great! Enough detail that I'd think she were 1/35th if you hadn't said she was 1/72nd. Good show!!! 

Real G: When I first saw two of the eight man crew listed as 'mechanics' as a kid my first thought was 'did they break down so much they had to carry two mechanics along?' I think they were the guys that worked the transmission actually. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by PFJN on Friday, January 18, 2019 9:05 AM

Real G

PFJN,

That turned out great!

Most people have not a clue how hard it was to operate a WW I tank.  There was a mock-up of a Mk.IV interior at the Tank Museum in Bovington, where visitors were invited to take up stations and try to start the simulated engine.  Detailed instructions were given, but it noted that THREE people were needed to get it running.  Since I was with only one friend, we were unable to get the engine turned over, despite mad efforts to work all the controls!  Two guys were needed just to work the transmission, and with no intercom in a hot, lurching metal box with an exposed engine in the middle, one can imagine how hard it was to effectively communicate and coordinate actions.

 
Hi,
 
Thanks Gamera, RealG and Rambo.  That sounds like an interesting experience at the museum.  The more I have read abou these early types of armor the more I realize that they were at the same time both very advanced for their time while also being fairly primitive by modern standards.  As I understand it, the biggest advantage of the Mark V over the Mark IV was that its new gearbox meant that it actually only took 1 person to stear the tank, instead of 3 like you noted for the Mark IV.  I have also read that the German A7V tank, which was actually just a bit shorter than the Mark IV and Mark V, but taller, actually had a crew of 18-22 as compared to the 8 men on the British tanks Surprise.  I can't imagine how they crammed them all in.
 
PF
 
PS.  On a similar note about engines, at the college I went to they had an old submarine diesel generator in the basement for emergency power, and part of our freshman indoctrination was taking us down there to show us how to assist in starting it up.  It was amazing how long it took several different students had to try to pump up the starting air reservoir. Stick out tongue

1st Group BuildSP

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Friday, January 18, 2019 10:36 AM

WW I tanks were the first, so naturally they were cumbersome to operate and were mechanically unreliable.  Throw in poorly developed tactics with bad designs like the German A7V or French St Chamond, and it’s no wonder they had so many problems.

The A7V had 16-18 men because it had 6 machine gun positions in addition to the main gun.  It must have been awful inside, since there were TWO exposed engines!  The commander and driver sat directly above them, so I can imagine the heat and fumes were quite lovely.

Compare that to modern AFVs with their air conditioning, ergonomics, safety systems, and comfy ride (well, as opposed to having NO shock absorbers like the rhomboid tanks).  Of course today’s tankers still have to worry about being a bullet magnet on the battlefield, plus there’s more stuff to manage, like all that sophisticated electronic equipment.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    April 2006
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by waynec on Friday, January 18, 2019 3:59 PM

we need some warwheels here.

Никто не Забыт. Ничто не Забыт

"No one is forgotten. Nothing is forgotten."

 

  • Member since
    June 2004
  • From: East Stroudsburg, PA
Posted by TigerII on Friday, January 18, 2019 4:59 PM

Nice work PF. Those washes and the Micro-flat spray really downplayed the colors and the Iron Cross insignias.

Achtung Panzer! Colonel General Heinz Guderian
  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by PFJN on Friday, January 18, 2019 9:00 PM

Hi,

Since I've never down a Group Build before, I guess I should ask, am I allowedd to downlaod one of the group build logos and add it to my signature now?

PS.  I noticed that my tank still looked a bit glossy this evening so I gave it a coat of Tamiya XF-86 "Flat Clear" which really helped knock the shine down a bit.  Below is one last photo, after adding the flat clear coat, and with a penny in fornt for scale, and the box art in back for reference.  Overall I didn't try to model my camoflage directly on the tank shown on the box (which was for a captured tank that the Germans nicknamed "Hanni"), but it is kind of loosely based on another similar captured tank (that was nicknamed "Annchen").  As such the colors are similar but the camoflage patch locations and shapes differ a bit from what was shown on the box art Smile

Flat Coat

[Please click for a closer view]

1st Group BuildSP

  • Member since
    June 2004
  • From: East Stroudsburg, PA
Posted by TigerII on Saturday, January 19, 2019 6:28 PM

 Now I know why when I do a model and all the hatches and doors are closed I don't particularly care if there is an interior or not. Well most of my interior will not be seen, but I figured it would give me added modelling experience. So I thought I'd post these pics of the interior; some built, some not; then they were primed with ModelMaster White Primer. I gave it a light priming and then airbrushed with Tamiya Buff and handpainted with ModelMaster Steel and Tamiya Gun Metal. I decided against the dark red metal primer paint and I thought the Buff color would be a little lighter. Oh well.

Achtung Panzer! Colonel General Heinz Guderian
  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by PFJN on Sunday, January 20, 2019 1:42 AM

Hi,

I enjoyed experimenting around on the last build so much that I went ahead and bought an Emhar German A7V to go with it.  Its an even simpler kit than the Mk IV tank, but since it doesn't have any locator pins either, and ost the parts have beveled edges for joints, it does require a little bit of clean up and care when assembling. 

Overall I got most of it done in one evening, except for the tracks/suspension, which I just want to clean up a bit before glueing them in place.  They are actually  very simple with everything molded as two pieces (one for the left side of the tank and the other for the right side).  The only real problem that I experienced in the build was for the main gun mount, which didn't seem to want to sit right.  So I trimmed it a bit, before glueing it in place.

Hopefully I will get it primed tomorrow so that I can paint it shortly.

It looks kind of interesting in comparison to the ex-British Mark IV model that I previously built, as shown below.  In general the A7V is just a little shorter, with the main body looking to be just a bit wider (though narrower than the overall width of the Mark IV tank, with its sponsons).  However, it is a fair bit taller than the ex-British tank.  

In looking at the two vehicles, it is hard enough to figure out how 8 people fit into the Mark IV tank, let alone 18-23 in the A7V tank.  You can also kind of see that each nation appears to have had different ideas in mind in their early tank designs.

As I understand it, for the Mark IV, the tracks that go all around the tank, so that they are not covered by anything, and are the furthest extents of the vehicle foward and aft, plus the overall rhomboid shape of the tank all were driven by a desire to be able to cross "no man's land" between the opposing sides, destroy obstacles and barb wire, and cross the enemies trench lines.

On the other hand, the relatively high height of the German vehicle, combined with its body which overhangs the tracks, seem to potentially limit operating in very rough terrain, and give the whole vehicle more a look of being a "mobile fortress" or "mobile pillbox".

PF

A7V and Mk IV

1st Group BuildSP

  • Member since
    September 2017
  • From: Netherlands
Posted by Sailing_Dutchman on Sunday, January 20, 2019 3:24 PM
Nice work there PF, I have added the Mk. IV to the front page. Congratulations on being the first to finish, you are an inspiration to us all.

   

  • Member since
    September 2017
  • From: Netherlands
Posted by Sailing_Dutchman on Sunday, January 20, 2019 3:52 PM

waynec - Sorry that I forgot to add you Embarrassed. The roster has now been duly updated. Good luck on your build.

   

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