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Revell Yacht America

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  • Member since
    September, 2012
Revell Yacht America
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, October 08, 2013 1:13 PM

Cup fever swept across the Bay Area this Fall, and I was bit hard. In addition to going to all of the races, I had the opportunity to see the replica of America up close.

And, I picked up the model for a reasonable sum on eBay.

This version came with the soft sails, which I don't plan to use.

First major task- the inside of the bulwarks had bad detail and overdone wood grain, so it needed to be removed.

Glued the hull together, and sanded down the overdone copper plates and wood topsides.

Removed all of the deck furniture. I am going to re plank the deck with BJ strip decking, stained and the edges blackened to represent caulking. I have the drawings on order, in order to get the pattern and lengths.

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cave City, KY
Posted by Watchmann on Tuesday, October 08, 2013 1:26 PM

Subscribed!

  • Member since
    June, 2013
  • From: Jax, FL
Posted by Viejo on Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:40 PM

Indeed.  I'd love to see how this progresses....  And I wonder if there will ever be a scale 72 foot cat released by someone....

  • Member since
    July, 2010
  • From: Tempe AZ
Posted by docidle on Friday, October 11, 2013 12:17 AM

Looking good GM!  I am looking forward to your build.

Steve

       

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
Posted by subfixer on Friday, October 11, 2013 9:00 AM

Seventeen clamps!   I don't even own a clothes pin.

I'm from the government and I'm here to help.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, October 11, 2013 9:05 AM

Speaking of clothspins, Model Expo sells miniature clothspins that are only slightly over an inch long.  They  are wooden, so I find it easy to taper the clamping end with a disk sander to make them easy to use for tight areas.  They are really nice for modeling. I think they were only a buck or two for about two dozen.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, October 12, 2013 2:21 PM

My drawings and booklet arrived from Blue Jacket Friday. These are just what I needed. Nicely drawn and very detailed.

Put together a nice little stand.

Measured out the sheer line from the drawings, making allowance for the thickness of the plastic sub deck and eventual wood planks. Glued in blocks to support the sub deck.

Then I figured out a way to set up the mast steps, since I am not using the plastic ones that stuck into sockets in the deck.

I am using the mast center lines as a basis for scaling. The model scales at about 1/64.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, October 13, 2013 1:15 AM

The quarterdeck break has a little crown (camber) cast into it but the deck is otherwise flat.

I roughly shaped a half-dozen deck beams that will give the rest of the (sub) deck the same shape.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, October 16, 2013 3:52 AM

Set up the waterway planks. I will sand them down from 1/32" to 1/50".

Set up the bulwark stanchions based on the frame lines which I marked out on the sub deck.

  • Member since
    June, 2012
Posted by arnie60 on Wednesday, October 16, 2013 1:28 PM

pic for waterways is a bit fuzzy. Wondering if you scarfed the pieces together or steamed them to get the bend.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, October 16, 2013 1:47 PM

Steamed them. A little small to scarf. I've decided to cut the cap rails out of wide stock...

  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
Posted by subfixer on Thursday, October 17, 2013 9:01 AM

You better not be messin' up Mizz G-Mo's kitchen counter, ya big galoot!

I'm from the government and I'm here to help.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 12:25 AM

Waterways and timberheads complete. Installed the grub beam across the deck break, and the coamings for the hatches, companionway and bases for the capstan and forward skylight.

  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
Posted by subfixer on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 10:20 AM

I see the grub beam there, but have a question; What is a grub beam for?

I'm from the government and I'm here to help.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 6:19 PM

A grub beam is one that  is there for its shape not its structure.

In this case the schooner has a 6" break in the deck between the masts, creating a quarter deck. I can't really figure out why except that without it there would be no bulwark at all in the waist.

This boat would have been a nightmare to sail in the dark. A rail about a foot above the deck and that grub beam half way back. Maybe not a big deal in the Sound, but imagine halfway across the Atlantic tripping and going over.

It's no wonder the deck furniture and the lower parts of the masts were painted white.

  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
Posted by subfixer on Wednesday, October 23, 2013 10:25 AM

I'd have a lanyard tied to me waist, arrgh!  

I'm from the government and I'm here to help.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, October 23, 2013 11:30 AM

Made up the masts and bowsprit yesterday using the "octagon" shaving method with square stock.

The two masts are the same diameter and length.

Note that it helps to leave a 1/4" extra at the end because of the inevitable sanding taper. These get collar fittings however, so the amount to remove may be a little less after I carve the shoulders for the fittings.

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Wednesday, October 23, 2013 10:37 PM

GMorrison
This boat would have been a nightmare to sail in the dark. A rail about a foot above the deck and that grub beam half way back. Maybe not a big deal in the Sound, but imagine halfway across the Atlantic tripping and going over.

I want to remember reading, ages and ages ago about a racing crew sailing a similar vessel across the Atlantic. I want to remember that they rigged temporary lifelines for the crossing.

As mentioned above, these were austere vessels built for speed, not comfort.  The area under the cockpit would have a compartment mostly to secure the ship's papers in; perhaps a bare-bones cabin for the owner.  The rest of the space was open hold, with a platform or orlop over the bilges to stow the sails upon.

So, for the ocean crossing, a frame of cribbing was set up under one of the hatches , upon which the iron stove was lashed.  Some bins for fuel for the stove would be fit to the cribbing, too.  Had to be under a hatch as there is no Charlie Noble on these vessels.  Berthing was by way of hammocks from deck beams, or by flaking out on the bagged sails.

That grub beam probably had some structural merit; but, as noted above, probably existed as a social limit.  Only those of suitable station were allowed aft of it.

The model is shaping up a beauty, and we are the better for having seen it.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, October 26, 2013 10:07 PM

Thank for the generous words, Captain. We shall see and it's time to keep the crew in line. It seems that the crew had an accommodation up forward as you say, the owner and his son had a little stateroom each more like a locker on either side of the mast, and the hatches had a booby cover each fitted later while in England.

The drawings show a little galley with a stove pipe.

I had the misfortune to be the hash slinger on a 5 day sailboat race "Rund Sjelland" in 1978, around the Island of Sjelland on which Kobenhavn lies.

The only thing worse than feeding all the Knuts and Erics was tiller duty at night. You see these cross channel ferries coming, but cannot judge distance and track very well and tend to let the boat drift up the side of their path. At which point you truly lose your position until morning.

Any how off to the coppering yard.

  • Member since
    June, 2010
  • From: Irvine, CA
Posted by Force9 on Sunday, October 27, 2013 11:32 PM

GM - Looks terrific, I've pulled up a chair.

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Monday, October 28, 2013 12:31 AM

Gorgeous copperring.

Can't wait to see more of the spars.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 2:48 AM

The hull was towed back from the coppering yard and looks watertight.

The gold leaf guys have put on the garlands but need to come back tomorrow and brush off the excess. The idea is to get all of the hull details done before she goes in for the topside finishes.

The deck is started.

  • Member since
    June, 2012
Posted by arnie60 on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 10:05 AM

I have never quite got the sense of the word 'awesome' as it is made up of two words. Awe, which in its self denotes an overwhelmed response, but then followed by some, which seems to detract from the meaning. I am overwhelmed, but only some? Anyway.Kidding aside. Awesome! GM

I tried the gold leaf thing w/ my Connie, but just could not get it to work right. Leave it overnight before brushing off the excess?

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, October 30, 2013 3:05 AM

Thank you Arnie. This has really turned out to be the best of several ways

to go,

The hull is correct and I get to scratch build everything from the deck up.

I've never built a plank-on-bulkhead ship so this is working out to be a good start towards that,

I have built quite a few solid hull wood models and have the Model Shipways "Elsie" on the way.

One thing; this model is really BIG! Highly recommended.

OK the Lief sisters came in to the yard and reworked the scrolls.

After they left, Leff Niepad and his rather stupid brother Wright showed up to plank the quarterdeck. They work silently, and I'm pleased with their progress.

  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
Posted by subfixer on Wednesday, October 30, 2013 1:11 PM

Lookin' good, G-Mo.

I'm from the government and I'm here to help.

  • Member since
    June, 2012
Posted by arnie60 on Wednesday, October 30, 2013 1:31 PM

Still wondering about the 'trick' to doing gold leaf GM. Gimmie a couple of pointers? Would appreciate it much. Thanks

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, November 04, 2013 11:19 PM

Planking is a little tedious, but needs to be carefully done for good results.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 1:23 AM

Bumping this thread. She is back on the bench.

  • Member since
    February, 2007
  • From: Brunswick, Ohio
Posted by Buckeye on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 11:48 AM

Thanks for the bump, she's looking good!

Mike

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, June 09, 2015 11:23 PM

bump. Up front on the bench

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