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USS Missouri at Tokyo Bay for Surrender......paint scheme

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  • Member since
    January, 2011
USS Missouri at Tokyo Bay for Surrender......paint scheme
Posted by Jason5371 on Friday, July 14, 2017 9:17 AM

Greetings all!

I am about to start working on the Tamiya 1:350 Missouri.  I am wanting to model her in the paint scheme she wore during the Japanese surrender.   The only problem is, every picture I have found so far is either in black and white, or in color and only showing a very small portion of the ship, concentrating more on the sailors watching the surrender.

I will admit that with work, a family, and trying to get our house ready to sell, I have not really had ample time to research as to what paint scheme to use.  But, I thought one of my modelling fraternity brothers and sisters might have a quick answer for me.  I do appreciate the input from anybody and everybody.  Hopefully I can get this one looking good enough to post some pics once completed!

 

Thanks in advance and happy modelling!

 

Jason

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, July 14, 2017 9:30 AM

No expert on US ships, but i know Soverign Hobbies lists a number of schemes for different ships. This is the page for US ships.

https://www.sovereignhobbies.co.uk/pages/united-states-navy-colour-scheme

And this is what they give for the Missouri in Tokyo Bay.

Hull—5-N Navy Blue ( US 08);

Hull above US 08, & superstructure—#27 Neutral Haze Gray (US 28);

Horizontal surfaces—20-B Deck Blue (US 10);

Boot-topping—Black (C 02);

Underwater hull—Norfolk 65-A Antifouling Red ( US 14).

Hope that helps.

 ''I am a Norfolk man, and I glory in being so''

On the bench: Dragon 1/35th Pz II Ausf F

  • Member since
    January, 2011
Posted by Jason5371 on Friday, July 14, 2017 9:36 AM

Thanks Bish!  That helps out tremendously!  Thanks for the links as well!

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, July 14, 2017 9:38 AM

No problem.

 ''I am a Norfolk man, and I glory in being so''

On the bench: Dragon 1/35th Pz II Ausf F

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Meridian, ID
Posted by modelcrazy on Friday, July 14, 2017 9:40 AM

Also try this link,

http://www.shipcamouflage.com/camouflage_database.htm

She wore a MS 22 scheme.

ON THE BENCH

1/35 Italeri Carro Armato M13/40
1/48 Italeri Hurricane Mk.1 Trop

In Que

1/24 Monogram 1930 Packard Bobtail Speedster
1/25 Monogram 57 Chevy Bel Air

  • Member since
    January, 2011
Posted by Jason5371 on Friday, July 14, 2017 9:43 AM

Cool!  Thanks!

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, July 14, 2017 11:08 AM

And one last thing. She was very heavily weathered.

 

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, July 14, 2017 12:30 PM

Now See !

 "G" that's exactly what I've talked about before . Many looked very grungy and ill cared for in wartime . Considering what was going on I am surprised the Admiral didn't put some men over the side to try and clean her up !

 That is a very exppressive picture . The " MO " at last , quieting her guns and being the place it officially ended !

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, July 15, 2017 12:10 AM

Do note, though, that the superstructure paint is no where near as bad as the hull paint.

That's because the crew had access to the superstructure while underway (unlike the hull).

The ship was in the Pacific, not the Eastern Front, and unlike panzers in the snow and mud, the ships had plenty of paint aboard and idle hands to be put to applying same.

  • Member since
    May, 2010
Posted by amphib on Saturday, July 15, 2017 6:24 AM

I think there was a message being sent to the Japanese. That was that although we had clearly beaten them and won the war we were not going to lord it over them. If you note the uniform of the day for the officers was ordinary working washed kahki. No fancy uniforms, no medals, no gloves and swords. Same goes for the ship. Although the surrender area is clean and well painted, the teak deck is covered with ordinary deck paint.

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Saturday, July 15, 2017 12:00 PM

I am struck by the appearance of the aft funnel cap.  It almost looks as if it were painted a darker color than that of the forward funnel. 

Bill Morrison

  • Member since
    February, 2016
  • From: Western No. Carolina
Posted by gene1 on Saturday, July 15, 2017 5:27 PM

Bill, does that look like soot below the top edge being black ? My brother on the Indiana was in Pearl for repairs from a kamakazi hit on their prop. He (& the Indiana) took the Missouri out on it's initial run from Pearl to the South Pacific & then was with her at the surrender. 

   At supper one night my wife asked him how long it was before he came back to the US. He said only a week as they brought 1000 POW's back from Japan. He said they had a 24 hr messhall & the POW's got first serve. That was the only time I ever saw a lot of emotion when he talked about that.

    All the new Battleships had been going up the Jap coast bombarding it before the surrender . After the surrender his ship sent a bunch of the tallest guys  into Japan with 45's & he was one of them. They had no trouble. Our next door neighbor was captured at Corregador & lost his leg while a prisoner. I have wondered if he might have been on my brother's ship. There is a good picture of the Indiana coming under the Golden Gate bridge when they came home. That must have been a little over 2 or 3 weeks after the end. It was inregular gray & no camoflage.

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Sunday, July 16, 2017 7:46 AM

Gene, it could be soot, shadow, or worn paint showing the previous camouflage.  Thanks for sharing that story of your brother and the Indiana.  It is inspiring!  I wish that we Americans today could treat each other with such humanity, courtesy, and respect.  It would be good to see once again.

Bill

 

  • Member since
    February, 2016
  • From: Western No. Carolina
Posted by gene1 on Sunday, July 16, 2017 9:52 AM

That humanity & respect has disapeared  in our country. It has never, ever been like this. 

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Sunday, July 16, 2017 10:03 AM

I'm trying to figure out Flickr after Photobucket imposed the cost for photo sharing

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/152644323@N05/35777831532/in/dateposted-public/

Photo of Missouri Model surrender scene at the Nimitz Museum in Fredericksburg, TX

Tried hosting on PostImage

You need to add the 1500 witnesses to the event,  along with the staging for  the press which was erected to the side of the 'surrender deck'.  

https://www.flickr.com/photos/152644323@N05/

The Japanese delegation.   Note the blue deck,  and the white stripe behind the vertical ladder of the 14-inch gun house.

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, July 16, 2017 11:26 AM

Looks like you are getting the hang of it. Big Bren gun there.

I'm now trying Fotki, which I like. Funny how the PB hubbub subsided quickly.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Sunday, July 16, 2017 2:40 PM

GMorrison

Looks like you are getting the hang of it. Big Bren gun there.

I'm now trying Fotki, which I like. Funny how the PB hubbub subsided quickly.

 

Thats not a Bren.  It is a Japanese Type 99 Light Machine Gun (light my eye -- the thing weighs almost 30 pounds empty!).  

Here it is for the world to see.    Someone recommended Postimage.org.   It has an interface similar to PB

My wife gave me the backstairs tour of the WWII Museum in New Orleans for Christmas.   Had a chance to handle a bunch of period weapons (no shooting).   First-hand crawl over and into their M4.

The museum in New Orleans is a good show.   The Home Front gallery has since opened as has their boat ride on the refurbished PT boat.   If you are anywhere near the SE USA put it on your must do list.    While in NOLA there are also good groceries to be consumed.    Hey Aaron,  you should send Elisabeth there for a museum report.  

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, July 16, 2017 10:14 PM

EdGrune
light my eye -- the thing weighs almost 30 pounds empty

Well, the next size up, the Type 92, called "The Woodpecker" was about 70#, 122# with the mount.  So, that 99 is light-er :)

The US never really had a like weapon.  So, you went from the BAR at 19-22#; then, eventually, the 32# M-1919A6 (the regular 1919A4 was 31, with a 60# tripod), and the water-cooled M-1917 was a svelte 49# with it's 60# tripod.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Monday, July 17, 2017 10:11 AM

Yes, the curator who was running the session noted that in US parlance an air-cooled M-1919 .30 caliber machine gun was considered to be a 'light' gun while a water-cooled .30 caliber was considered to be 'heavy'.   Same could be said for a .50 caliber comparing the infantry weapon vs the water-cooled anti-aircraft version.

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