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Proposals for new 1/350 scale ships?

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  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Proposals for new 1/350 scale ships?
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 2:59 PM

Because it appears the model manufacturers actually DO look at such forums as these, perhaps it is time once again for everybody to put their two cents in for proposed 1/350 scale ship kits!  My personal requests would include:

DKM Prinz Eugen:  Because it ridiculous that SO many examples of Bismarck have been produced, but without her equally famous consort (remember, Prinz Eugen survived!!)

HMS Repulse:  Because multiple versions of HMS Prince of Wales have been produced, but again, without her important consort (and it's a really graceful ship too!)!!

USS Northampton:  Because this class was involved in more knock-down drag out surface battles with the IJN than just about any other

USS New Mexico: Because in it's 'modernized' post-Pearl Harbor version, she was a really graceful ship, and her class was involved in the final conflict between battleships at Leyte

IJN Hiryu: Because their simply aren't any IJN carriers in this scale (though there might be a Shinano around, it had a lousy service record!)

 

What do you think??

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Connecticut, USA
Posted by Aurora-7 on Monday, November 26, 2007 4:11 PM
I've been baffled that a 1/350 of the WWII US aircraft carrier Enterprise (CV-6) had not yet been produced. Hornet, Essex, Massachussetts but no Big E?

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 4:23 PM

Well, at least there is a close sister-ship that can be easily 'tweaked' to give you an 'Enterprise!'  Actually, I get rather annoyed at manufacturuers who give you endless iterations of the same ship, just different decals......

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Central Wisconsin
Posted by Spamicus on Monday, November 26, 2007 4:30 PM
I'll second the Northampton class cruisers. They were real war horses.

Steve

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 4:52 PM
Yup, the Northamptons had a very busy war!  They also had a really pretty clipper bow, and a very aesthetic arrangement of guns, masts, superstructure, etc.  The San Francisco is in many ways very similar, but that snub bow just turns me off somehow.... I am fond of the modernized New Mexicos for much the same reason.  When you compare them to say, 'Arizona,' there is not much to choose between them!  Same is true for the modernized Italian battleships...
  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 5:00 PM

...and on the same basis, the IJN 'Shokaku' or 'Zuikaku' would be really good subjects!  I also like some of the more bizarre IJN carriers, like 'Ryujo' and 'Shoho,' not because they are gracefull (far from it!), but because they are so odd-looking, they fit in well with the Japanese 'pagoda battleships!'

I think much of the delay in getting some of these models out has been the financial state of the Japanese model companies (and Japanese companies, period!).  The Chinese jumped in (Trumper, Mini Model, Banner, etc) with both feet, but because of politics, refuse to consider making models of Japanese subjects.  The American and European companies (Revell, Heller, Airfix, etc.) are pretty much moribund, and the companies in Eastern Europe are mostly fixated with airplanes and armor.  Nice to see at least a few good kits coming from them though, such as the Borodinos, Varyag, etc....

  • Member since
    December, 2003
Posted by dnatech on Monday, November 26, 2007 5:35 PM

I would like to see a descent version of the USS Midway in any scale. 1/350 or 1/700 would be fine with me.

Steve

  • Member since
    April, 2007
Posted by PhantomGhost on Monday, November 26, 2007 5:49 PM
I'd like to see less world war 2 battleships and subs ( as I find them a bit boring ) and more newly tooled old sailing ships, nuclear subs and even a modern or fairly modern supertanker in styrene.
  • Member since
    June, 2006
  • From: Michigan
Posted by ps1scw on Monday, November 26, 2007 6:02 PM

Knox Class Frigate

Perry Class Frigate (short hull)

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 6:19 PM
Well, it seems to me there are QUITE A FEW nuclear subs, everything from Chinese, Russian, French, US subs of all classes, even a Brit nuke sub or two!  Yeah, there are probably enough US battleships anyways, and I am glad to see that some cruisers are being put out now.... Trumpeter has been putting out a fair number of frigates, destroyers and cruisers of modern design, and Italieri has a bunch too...
  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 6:20 PM
...and there are quite a few people that would like to see some new sailing ship models, but they seem to have been pretty much written off by the model makers......
  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 6:22 PM
... and i'd LOVE to see a USS Marblehead!!!
  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Connecticut
Posted by DBFSS385 on Monday, November 26, 2007 6:36 PM

A Wood Hull Subchaser or Ocean Fleet Tug from WW2 vintage.

A model of USS Parche SSN 683 with hull plug version ( Most decorated US Vessel)

Or a Model of any Skate Class SSN and or the USS Triton SSN 586

Be Well/DBF Walt
  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 7:06 PM
USS Parche (the WW2 namesake) was a very highly decorated vessel, but have not heard that the modern SSN 683 (also named Parche) has done anything of particular note....
  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 7:08 PM
Perhaps you are thinking of SS 384?
  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Portsmouth, RI
Posted by searat12 on Monday, November 26, 2007 7:16 PM
Might be cool to see one of the old US 'S' type subs as well.......... They had some surprising successes in the Pacific at the beginning of WW2, before the general deployment of the better-known Gatos....
  • Member since
    May, 2007
  • From: Atlanta, Georgia
Posted by RTimmer on Monday, November 26, 2007 8:07 PM

Hi all,

My first post... I've lately been focused on some of the battles in the Pacific Theater during WWII.  I have wanted to model representative ships of the Taffy 3 group, but can't find kits (much less good kits) for the destroyer escort and escort carrier ships.  So, I'd like to add:

USS Gambier Bay and USS Samuel B. Roberts in 1/350 scale.

Cheers, Rick

  • Member since
    September, 2015
  • From: The Redwood Empire
Posted by Aaronw on Monday, November 26, 2007 8:16 PM

What about the USS Indianapolis, its a rather famous ship both for its sinking and delivery of the A-bomb that as far as I know is only available in 1/700.

I'd love to see a well detailed injection kit of the YT146 Hoga, its not pretty but it worked hard to save a number of ships including the USS Nevada during and after the Pearl Harbor attack. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Hoga_(YT-146)

 

  • Member since
    May, 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Monday, November 26, 2007 8:53 PM

My votes go to several subjects that predated WWII.  The period leading up to the First World War was, arguably, the era of history when warship technology had the most impact on world affairs that it's ever had.  And some, at least, of the capital ships from that period were beautiful vessels.  And models of them takeup considerably less shelf space than models of WWII battleships or carriers on the same scale.  Yet the only 1/350 World War I capital ship kits on the market are the German ones from ICM. 

How about a 1/350 H.M.S. Iron Duke?  Or H.M.S. Lion? Or one of the beautiful Queen Elizabeth-class ships in her Jutland configuration?

Or how about a first-generation American battleship, with photo-etched parts to represent the "basket masts"? 

Or how about the battleship that, arguably, exerted the most historical influence of all (and that the plastic kit manufacturers have completely ignored):  H.M.S. Dreadnought?

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
Posted by subfixer on Monday, November 26, 2007 9:00 PM
I second that Dreadnought nomination. They should start off with her and follow up with the rest.

I'm from the government and I'm here to help.

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posted by ridleusmc on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 4:45 AM
 jtilley wrote:

My votes go to several subjects that predated WWII.  The period leading up to the First World War was, arguably, the era of history when warship technology had the most impact on world affairs that it's ever had.  And some, at least, of the capital ships from that period were beautiful vessels.  And models of them takeup considerably less shelf space than models of WWII battleships or carriers on the same scale.  Yet the only 1/350 World War I capital ship kits on the market are the German ones from ICM. 

How about a 1/350 H.M.S. Iron Duke?  Or H.M.S. Lion? Or one of the beautiful Queen Elizabeth-class ships in her Jutland configuration?

Or how about a first-generation American battleship, with photo-etched parts to represent the "basket masts"? 

Or how about the battleship that, arguably, exerted the most historical influence of all (and that the plastic kit manufacturers have completely ignored):  H.M.S. Dreadnought?

I agree with you the most. 

HMS Queen Elizabeth - Wasn't the Warspite a QE class ship?

American Battleships - I'd love to see a USS Texas (BB-35) in plastic.  It'd make an interesting subject in any of its configurations.   I'm biased, it makes for interesting hours when visiting Houston. 

Dreadnought? - What's that?  It sounds like the kind of ship that would spawn an arms race and create a basis for naval archetics for 50 years.  Even the name is cool enough to get people to buy kits. 

Semper Fi,

Chris

  • Member since
    May, 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 7:48 AM

Yes, the Warspite was one of the Queen Elizabeth-class battleships.  Airfix used to make a reasonable (for its age) version of her on 1/600 scale, but it represented her in her World War II configuration - by no means ugly, but an entirely different silhouette than she originally presented.  I also have vague recollections of an old Pyro 1/1200 version, which was a reboxing of one of the famous and much-missed Eagle Wall kits, from England.

I'd certainly second the nomination of the Texas; the fact that she's still around, and so many tourists visit her, might make her a little more attractive to the kit manufacturers.

In my ideal world of plastic kits, each of them would include enough alternative parts to build any member of a class in any of its configurations.  (I can visualize the boxtop:  "Iowa-class battleship.  May be built as Iowa, New Jersey, Wisconsin, or Missouri, in 1944, 1950, 1970, or 1991 configurations.  Full details of all color schemes worn by all ships enclosed.")  Maybe that will happen some day.  And maybe the sun will rise in the west. 

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by intruder_bass on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 11:06 AM

    I would put everything I am currently working on aside for one model and I would start it right away and would not stop untill its done!

    This would be 1/350 KIROV CLASS NUCLEAR CRUISER!!!

 

Andy

  • Member since
    May, 2007
  • From: Atlanta, Georgia
Posted by RTimmer on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 12:01 PM
 ridleusmc wrote:
 jtilley wrote:

My votes go to several subjects that predated WWII.  The period leading up to the First World War was, arguably, the era of history when warship technology had the most impact on world affairs that it's ever had.  And some, at least, of the capital ships from that period were beautiful vessels.  And models of them takeup considerably less shelf space than models of WWII battleships or carriers on the same scale.  Yet the only 1/350 World War I capital ship kits on the market are the German ones from ICM. 

How about a 1/350 H.M.S. Iron Duke?  Or H.M.S. Lion? Or one of the beautiful Queen Elizabeth-class ships in her Jutland configuration?

Or how about a first-generation American battleship, with photo-etched parts to represent the "basket masts"? 

Or how about the battleship that, arguably, exerted the most historical influence of all (and that the plastic kit manufacturers have completely ignored):  H.M.S. Dreadnought?

I agree with you the most. 

HMS Queen Elizabeth - Wasn't the Warspite a QE class ship?

American Battleships - I'd love to see a USS Texas (BB-35) in plastic.  It'd make an interesting subject in any of its configurations.   I'm biased, it makes for interesting hours when visiting Houston. 

Dreadnought? - What's that?  It sounds like the kind of ship that would spawn an arms race and create a basis for naval archetics for 50 years.  Even the name is cool enough to get people to buy kits. 

Semper Fi,

Chris

How about the first iteration of the USS Texas (launched 1892)?  It would also be of interest to have BB-3, USS Oregon, as one of the well-known vessels from the Spanish-American War.  I agree with "jtilley", the period from the 1890 through WWI is a very interesting period historically, and very underserved by the kits available.  The only choices I've really seen are the ICM kits of a few German ships from this period and (I think) a Revell kit of the SMS Emden.  I would also welcome a WWI era German U-Boat or two, as has been mentioned I think in this thread or another recent thread. 

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: OKC
Posted by stretchie on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 12:36 PM

oooo....is this where i get to say Delaware class battleship????? Whistling [:-^]

 

 

Smile,Wink, & Grin [swg]

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 1:39 PM
 RTimmer wrote:
[

How about the first iteration of the USS Texas (launched 1892)?  It would also be of interest to have BB-3, USS Oregon, as one of the well-known vessels from the Spanish-American War.  I agree with "jtilley", the period from the 1890 through WWI is a very interesting period historically, and very underserved by the kits available.  The only choices I've really seen are the ICM kits of a few German ships from this period and (I think) a Revell kit of the SMS Emden.  I would also welcome a WWI era German U-Boat or two, as has been mentioned I think in this thread or another recent thread. 

Iron Shipwright makes the Texas - as launched in 1898.    And at a hundred forty it is priced in the same ballpark as many of the new styrene releases.  Remember that photoetch details are included in most 1:350 scale kits.  They are not an aftermarket add-on which jacks the finished price

http://www.commanderseries.com/ships_350.html

ISW also makes several USN destroyers from the pre-WWI to WWI era,  including the Bainbridge, Hull, Paulding, and Smith. (I mastered the Smith for ISW, and have a Paul Jones in the works).   Oh, and I almost forgot the Ford Eagle Boat, which I also mastered for ISW.

YankeeModelworks (formerly Blue Water Navy) makes a 1:350 scale model of a German WWI sub, which at 40 dollars is also now in the same price range as styrene kits.

http://yankeemodelworks.com/35063_u35.htm

 

  • Member since
    May, 2007
  • From: Atlanta, Georgia
Posted by RTimmer on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 1:45 PM

Thanks, Ed - very helpful and much appreciated.  As someone coming back to this hobby after 30 years (i.e. not done anything since my childhood/early teen years), I find this forum wonderfully helpful and friendly. 

Since you didn't mention it, I'll assume that the Oregon is not available at this time? 

Also, do you know if the USS Samuel B. Roberts (DE) is available from someone in 1/350?

Thanks again!

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Harrisburg, PA
Posted by Lufbery on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 2:04 PM

Hi all, 

I second the nomination for a U.S.S. Enterprise (CV-6). There are some features of the Enterprise that would be hard (at least for me) to replicate by using a sister ship. 

I'd also love to see the U.S.S. Pennsylvania (BB-38) in her WWI configuration.

Regards, 

-Drew

Build what you like; like what you build.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 2:29 PM
 RTimmer wrote:

Thanks, Ed - very helpful and much appreciated.  As someone coming back to this hobby after 30 years (i.e. not done anything since my childhood/early teen years), I find this forum wonderfully helpful and friendly. 

Since you didn't mention it, I'll assume that the Oregon is not available at this time? 

Also, do you know if the USS Samuel B. Roberts (DE) is available from someone in 1/350?

Thanks again!

The Oregon is not currently available.  They used to have one, but its off the list -- the master probably needs to be re-worked. 

The Roberts was a John C Butler-class.   There is not a model of a Butler-class DE currently available in 1:350 scale.   I have just finished reading 'Halsey's Typhoon" and I want to do the Tabberer, which rescued 55 men from ships sunk in the typhoon.    The Tabby was also a Butler.  A Butler is essentially a low, enclosed bridge Buckley hull with 5-inch guns fore & aft.   Since most of us don't model the propulsion system, those differences are moot.   

ISW makes a Rudderow which is essentially a Butler (low bridge & 5-inch guns) with a different propulsion system.  Lindberg makes a 1:300-ish scale of a Rudderow sold as the DeLong.

 

  • Member since
    May, 2007
  • From: Atlanta, Georgia
Posted by RTimmer on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 7:15 PM
Thanks, Ed - very helpful on the possible routes to a Butler class vessel.  Cheers, Rick

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