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Read any good books lately?

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  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 8:44 PM

Bill,

Sorry, the brain turned left at Alberquerque when I typed Greg. 

John

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 10:21 PM

GMorrison

Yes and its hard to mention Guadalcanal as anything other than it's own key battle.

Have you read "Battle Cry"?

 

I vaguely recall reading that, along with another one of his novels, Mitla Pass. Leon Uris, right?

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, February 2, 2017 10:43 PM

Just ordered "The Battle for Hell Island".

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Philadelphia Pa
Posted by Nino on Friday, February 3, 2017 11:20 AM

I'm up to Vol V of Samuel Eliot Morison's 15 Volume History of the United States Naval Operations in World War II. A great Canvas to view the USA's War at Sea.  It has many personel entries from the actual participants. A perfect stating point for developing future modeling interests in the USN.

Jim.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Friday, February 3, 2017 11:41 AM

I'm reading Dan Barry's "Bottom of the 33rd", about the longest baseball game in history, the April 18th, 1981 game between the Pawtucket Red Sox and the Rochester Red Wings, of the Triple-A International League.  The game was started on a cold Saturday night, was tied after nine innings, and eventuall lasted over 8 hours before someone was able to reach the league president, who ordered the game suspended.  Apparently, the game should have been suspended after midnight, according to the league's curfew rule, but the umpire calling the game had an older rule book that did not contain that rule.  There were a number of records set by that game, and Wade Boggs and Cal Ripken, Jr both played in that game.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, February 3, 2017 11:42 AM

stikpusher

 

 
GMorrison

Yes and its hard to mention Guadalcanal as anything other than it's own key battle.

Have you read "Battle Cry"?

 

 

 

I vaguely recall reading that, along with another one of his novels, Mitla Pass. Leon Uris, right?

 

Yes, Leon Uris. He wrote a lot of good books Exodus among them. (Not the original).

Battle Cry is his personal account of his service in the 6th Marine Regiment, San Diego, New Zealand, Guadalcanal, Tarawa and Saipan.

I think you'd like it.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    September 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Friday, February 3, 2017 11:43 AM

ManCityFan
Bernard Cornwell's "Saxon Tales" series of books. That man can write!! Now working on Bruce Catton's series of Civil War books written for the Centennial. A little old, but great reading.
 

I'll 2nd the Saxon Tales!Yes

-Andy

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: West of the rock and east of the hard place!
Posted by murph on Sunday, February 5, 2017 9:08 AM

Since finishing All The Fine Young Eagles, I've read Capturing Hill 70; an account of one of Canada's forgotten significant battles of WWI that occurred between the offensive at Vimy Ridge and the Third Battle of Ypres (Paaschendaele) in 1917.  The battles for Hill 70 and Lens were a semi-diversionary attack for an upcoming major offensive in the Flanders regions of Belgium.  They successfully captured Hill 70, on the outskirts of the town of Lens.  What the leaders and planners underestimated was the resolve of the German forces.  Planners presumed that once Hill 70 was captured, the Germans would fold up their tents and retire from Lens.  They were wrong.  The German defenders put up a good fight and held Lens and the Canadians and other Empire tropps were denied their walk into Lens.  Lens did eventually come under control of the British and Canadians but not until later in the war.

Retired and living the dream!

  • Member since
    January 2014
Posted by gobobbie on Sunday, February 5, 2017 9:49 AM
Just finished the "The Real X Men" by Robert Lyman. It tells the story of the British x sub's and swimmers. The British attempted to copy Decima Mas X successes, without the the same results. A side note from the book, the divers used salvaged German aircraft oxygen cylinders because they were superior to British ones. Bob Gregory Ruining one kit at a time
  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, February 6, 2017 1:16 PM

I finished "Stay The Rising Sun", a biography of CV-2 USS Lexington.

I liked it, plus as a bonus there's an appended chapter about CV-16, and also summary bios of the main characters.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, February 7, 2017 1:18 AM

I started "Flyboys".

I want to like it and the author is respectable, but gosh it is so factually inaccurate right from the get-go.

Anyone else have an opinion?

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, February 7, 2017 11:37 AM

Is that the one about the Navy aviators downed at Chichi Jima?

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, February 7, 2017 12:08 PM

Yes, same author who wrote "Flags of our Fathers".

The first couple of chapters are an unholy mess. The erradication of native Americans, the persecution of Christians in Medieval Japan, European 19th Century Imperialism and the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Japanese civilians by B-29s all get conflated into a huge hairball that seems to point to the cause of war being our base inhuman instincts rather than any geopolitical factors.

I guess I'll ride it out. I'm also starting a book about VS-6 while they were based at Henderson Field in 1942.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, February 7, 2017 3:17 PM

I suspect that it's parts of both- the base human instincts and geopolitical ambitions combined. But that's for folks way above my pay grade to worry about and deal with.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    February 2013
  • From: Podunkville, USA
Posted by rommelkiste on Tuesday, February 7, 2017 7:04 PM

Just finished up my forth.  An Autobiography of Nigel Mansell.  It was a pretty good read if you are a Mansell Fan.   The Unfair Advantage by Mark Donohue, The German Army 1933-1945 by Matthew Cooper and last, Crisis of Character by Gary J. Byrne.  THAT was an exceptional read.  

Nothing ever fits……..and when it does, its the wrong scale.

To make mistakes is human.  To blame it on someone else shows management potential. 

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2010
  • From: Tempe AZ
Posted by docidle on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 9:29 PM

I just finished Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors. It was a definite page turner.

Steve

       

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 8:28 PM

Just finished "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck.  Great book!

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/48 Airfix Bf109 & 1/35 Tamiya Famo

On deck: Who knows!

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: MN
Posted by Nathan T on Thursday, February 16, 2017 7:52 AM

GMorrison

I started "Flyboys".

I want to like it and the author is respectable, but gosh it is so factually inaccurate right from the get-go.

Anyone else have an opinion?

 

 

the truth can hurt... I did like that book and it's been quite awhile since I read it. It is a very different way of starting a WW II narrative but I feel it conveys the root of that Generation of Japanese people's feelings and beliefs, whether right or wrong. 

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, February 16, 2017 11:35 AM

If you want to read the Japanese perspective on WWII, I highly recommend John Toland's two volume work "The Rising Sun". Very eye opening for a westerner to see the other side's viewpoint for the portion of time covered in the book.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, February 16, 2017 11:40 AM

Mopar Madness

Just finished "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck.  Great book!

 
"Of Mice and Men" got me in trouble in 7th grade.  My English teacher, Mrs. Ruth, was a big fan of John Steinbeck, and we were reading, "The Pearl", which I couldn't stand, by the way.  In one class session, she told us about Steinbeck's other works, including "Of Mice and Men."  And as she described Lenny and George, I realized that Warner Brothers' cartoonists used them as the models for Benny and George in the first Speedy Gonzalez cartoon, "Cat-Tails for Two".  And I laughed.  Mrs. Ruth yelled at me, saying, "John Steinbeck is not funny!"  And that just made me laugh all the harder.
 
Steinbeck also wrote a version of the tales of King Arthur, which I read and enjoyed thoroughly.  It helped me understand Sir Thomas Mallory's "Morte d'Arthur" better.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, February 16, 2017 11:43 AM

I made a stop at a local Barnes & Noble last night on the way home and loaded up on some books for my queue.  Along with the first two volumes of the "Expanse" series by James S. A Carey (a pseudonym for a team of two authors, actually), and two David Drake novels, I also picked up, "In Harm's Way", about the sinking of the Indianapolis.  I started it last night, and it's a quick read.  I got half-way through it, ending up at the end of the first day the survivors spent in the water.  I expect to finish it tonight.

And so far, there's been no mention of Quint, or Herbie Robinson....

Big Smile

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Thursday, February 16, 2017 7:37 PM

I never knew they were the basis for those characters!  Very interesting!

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/48 Airfix Bf109 & 1/35 Tamiya Famo

On deck: Who knows!

  • Member since
    June 2007
Posted by jrb53 on Friday, February 17, 2017 8:47 PM

I just re-read the Grail Quest series by Bernard Cornwell, three great novels about an English archer's personal adventures during the Hundred Years War.  Also, if you like Cornwell, there are several wonderful adventure/maritime novels about early 1660's South Africa (English, Dutch, Portugese, Arab) conflicts by Wilbur Smith.  Everyone in the world seems to know his name except we Americans. :)

Currently, I'm finishing up Rustico, Regional Italian Country Cooking by Micol Negrin.  This was brought about due to my daughter, who was bored with ham/turkey and insisted that everyone bring something Italian to this year's big family Christmas dinner at her house.  Turned out to be a great success, while I learned that real Italian cooking does not mean tomato paste and oregano.  So be warned, if you read this book, you may never open up a can of Chef-Boyardee again!

Jack

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, February 20, 2017 10:58 AM

Yes, theres so much there, regional cooking. A couple of years ago we created the Feast of the Seven Fishes for Christmas as a family project. It doesnt have to be seven, just an odd number, but we made it. 

 

Nice change up of subject.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2005
  • From: Maine
Posted by PontiacRich on Monday, February 20, 2017 1:27 PM

I'm working my way through a re-read of Isaac Asimov's Robot, Empire and Foundation Series.  This time I'm reading them in the order Asimov suggested in the 80's.

I love pulling these old jems out of the pile every 15-20 years.

Also reading "Sailing Three Oceans" by Herb and Doris Smith.  It chronicles their building, sailing  and selling of wooden schooners in Maine, the last one being Eastwind.  Eastwind offers day sails in the Spring/Summer/Fall out of Boothbay Harbor, Maine

 

Rich - "And when the Band you're in starts playing different tunes, I'll see you on the Dark Side of the Moon" - Pink Floyd

FREDDOM

  • Member since
    February 2008
Posted by CaddMann05 on Sunday, February 26, 2017 9:39 AM

Clive Cusslar's The Dirk Pitt series.  Starting to collect hard copies of this series of books.  I don't like ebooks.

  • Member since
    December 2015
  • From: texas
Posted by DESooner on Tuesday, March 7, 2017 4:07 PM

I'm the opposite - I bought a Kindle some years ago and recently find that I can't go back to reading a paperback or hard copy book...

Some I've recently read (some have nothing to do with war):

Joe Buck - Lucky *** (autobiography)

Giles Milton - Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare (excellent book about guerilla warfare, Britain's development of secret weapons, etc)

Derek B Miller - The Girl in Green

Derek B. Miller - Norwegian By Night (you'll love Sheldon)

Now reading Choke by Chuck Palahniuk and Crazy Horse and Custer by Stephen Ambrose.

 

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Monday, March 13, 2017 5:37 PM

All, I just finished one of the most interesting and engaging books I've read in a long time.  The Fleet at Flood Tide by James Hornfisher covers the last year or so of WWII in the Central Pacific and the development of the strategic bombing campaign against Japan culminating with the atomic bombs.  Hornfisher discusses how the decision to drop the bombs was developed, and you meet several of the key players in the decision.  It may be his best book to date.

John

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Oak Harbor, WA
Posted by Kolja94 on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:20 AM

Just finished Ron Chernow's "Washington: A Life" and loved it.

Next up Alfred Lansing's "Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage"

Also working through Laurence Gonzales "Deep Survival"

Karl

  • Member since
    December 2015
  • From: providence ,r.i.
Posted by templar1099 on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 5:12 AM

 

I

 

 

"le plaisir delicieux et toujours nouveau d'une occupation inutile"

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