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Read any good books lately?

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  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Wednesday, January 6, 2016 7:07 PM

Just finished "A Higher Call" about Franz Stigler during WWII.  Interesting story and perspective on how there are good people on all sides of a war.  Will be starting to re-read "Battleship Bismark", written by the highest ranking surviving officer of the Bismark.  Interesting and sad story, given what happened during the sinking.

John

  • Member since
    September 2014
  • From: Massachusetts - now Maine
Posted by lonemoose on Saturday, January 23, 2016 10:27 AM

1066 by Peter Rex

ISBN 978-1-4456-0384-1

Many Bothans died to bring us this information... I wish it had been Ewoks... but no... it was Bothans...

Sibz,

Rock Star, Brain Surgeon

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, February 6, 2016 5:42 PM

That Bismark book is really good. I found a copy in a used book store. I had no idea it was written.

I just started a book "Shadow Divers" by Robert Kurson. Highly reccommended.

The title refers to near zero visibility diving 200 feet down. It's about a couple of experienced wreck divers who discover a U Boat off the coast of New Jersey in 1991 that was unknown.

How was the Norman book, Moose? I'm thinking about building a model of a ship from the Bayeux Tapestry, as I am just finishing a Viking ship. I made an effort way back when and went the see it. One of the more incredible things I have ever seen.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    January 2016
  • From: A Galaxy Far, Far Away
Posted by Hunter on Saturday, February 6, 2016 8:07 PM

I just finished reading "How to Model" Basic Skills and Techniques and getting ready to read Basic and Advance Airbrushing Skills and Techniques for Beginners. Dang Newbie's LOL

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Redcliffe, Queensland, Australia
Posted by Aussie Mick on Saturday, February 6, 2016 9:00 PM

Hunter

I just finished reading "How to Model" Basic Skills and Techniques and getting ready to read Basic and Advance Airbrushing Skills and Techniques for Beginners. Dang Newbie's LOL

 

we've all got to start somewhere Hunter. We were all newbies once. It's good to see you embracing the hobby. Your Dad would be proud.

  • Member since
    January 2014
Posted by gobobbie on Saturday, February 6, 2016 9:57 PM
Currently reading the Witch of Lime Street. It is the story Houdini, Arthur Conan doyle, Mina craden and a cast of characters. It is the story of Houdini exposing fake psychics, a contest by the scientific American to prove if spiritualism was true. It has a lot of background how spiritualism came about and why people flocked to it. Bob Gregory
  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, February 8, 2016 5:29 PM

GMorrison

I just started a book "Shadow Divers" by Robert Kurson. Highly reccommended.

The title refers to near zero visibility diving 200 feet down. It's about a couple of experienced wreck divers who discover a U Boat off the coast of New Jersey in 1991 that was unknown.

I finished this book last night after the game.

Anyone interested in U Boats; this is a must read. And if wreck diving is the thing, really well written, harrowing but informative.

It's crammed with a million little details.

No spoiler because this is in the intro, but it took the two divers 6 YEARS to make a positive ID of the boat. One major problem was that because the boat was built in mid 1944, the various plaques and plates were made from an alloy that dissolved in salt watr much more quickly than brass. Of course, exposure to salt water was not a recurring maintenace concern.

There's a Nova series I want to find about this one.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    December 2015
  • From: providence ,r.i.
Posted by templar1099 on Monday, February 29, 2016 4:57 PM

Since we're still going: A History Of Warfare, John Keegan.  Just finished: The Liberator. Felix Sparks ,157th Inf/45th Div, Thunderbirds. 500 days combat Anzio to Dachau.

"le plaisir delicieux et toujours nouveau d'une occupation inutile"

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 9:13 AM

I just finished "A Glorious Way to Die" by Russell Spurr, an account of the final action of the battleship Yamato. I really only had a passing knowledge of the event, so this filled in quite a few details.

As for a model, the thought terrifies me.

 

Reccommended.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 5:08 PM

GMorrison

I just finished "A Glorious Way to Die" by Russell Spurr, an account of the final action of the battleship Yamato. I really only had a passing knowledge of the event, so this filled in quite a few details.

Reccommended.

 

I read that one several years back. Excellent book!

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    January 2016
  • From: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posted by Sailor Steve on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 9:12 PM

I'm currently reading a recent translation of Herodotus' The Histories. The stories he had are still fun today, and still a gold mine of information about the era he lived in.

  • Member since
    January 2016
  • From: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posted by Sailor Steve on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 9:16 PM

GMorrison

I just finished "A Glorious Way to Die" by Russell Spurr, an account of the final action of the battleship Yamato. I really only had a passing knowledge of the event, so this filled in quite a few details.

If you haven't already read it, I'd like to recommend Japanese Destroyer Captain, by Tameichi Hara. He tells of many adventures in the Imperial Navy, and his own eyewitness account of the sinking of Yamato.

  • Member since
    January 2016
  • From: A Galaxy Far, Far Away
Posted by Hunter on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 11:53 PM

I just started reading a book titled The Atlas and Time Line of WWII. It has been very imformative and a truely great read so far.

My next read is titled: The Dark Tunnel Home....It's about a group of gentlemen that served during the Viet Nam war as "tunnel rats" and their experiences during that time.

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 12:18 AM

Your first title I've read. Snap thought- you are a visual person and thats in my way of thinking. I design timeline installations in all kinds of places like library walls.

I'll look that tunnel book up.

Nasty sh i t. My friends from Vietnam (i didn't get drafted until after 1972) were mostly rotor wing people.

Steve, yes Hara figures in the book.

A lot of really sad things in the book I read.

The Hellcats from TF58 machine gunning swimming survivors. The 30 man hot baths on Yamato ending up as body dumps.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    January 2011
  • From: Commonwealth of Virginia
Posted by Tal Afar Dave on Tuesday, April 5, 2016 5:14 PM

wolfhammer1

Just finished "A Higher Call" about Franz Stigler during WWII.  Interesting story and perspective on how there are good people on all sides of a war.  Will be starting to re-read "Battleship Bismark", written by the highest ranking surviving officer of the Bismark.  Interesting and sad story, given what happened during the sinking.

John

 

That IS a great book, John! I finished it around Christmas time and found a set of decals for the 109 and the B-17 in 1/72nd scale....a small, inflight diorama will be in the works....one day.......Embarrassed

TAD

2022 New Year's Resolution:  Enter 1 group build and COMPLETE a build this year!!  Why Photobucket did you rob me of my one Group Build Badge???  Must be part of the strong anti-Monogram cartel!!!

 ]

  • Member since
    January 2011
  • From: Commonwealth of Virginia
Posted by Tal Afar Dave on Tuesday, April 5, 2016 5:16 PM
Just finished a book called "Outlaw Platoon." It's the story of one 10th Mountain Division platoon leader taking the fight to the Taliban in Afghanistan. Rich in close contact firefights, which might be a good start to a diorama. More importantly, the leadership lessons learned are well worth the read alone. Tremendous young warriors..... TAD

2022 New Year's Resolution:  Enter 1 group build and COMPLETE a build this year!!  Why Photobucket did you rob me of my one Group Build Badge???  Must be part of the strong anti-Monogram cartel!!!

 ]

  • Member since
    April 2006
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by waynec on Tuesday, April 5, 2016 5:35 PM

currently reading BATTLE CRY OF FREEDOM for a class. also THE RUSSIAN CIVIL WAR.

i will be teaching an 8 week/16 hour class on the russian front in january 2017. this is for OLLI, classes for retirees and seniors who want to continue learning. this would be taught at the grand operational level, ie some divisions but mostly corps and army units. it would be for folks who have little knowledge of the subject, not GROGNARDs like us who know the difference between a PZ-IVF1 and a PZ-IVH. 

i am looking for a one volume book. here are the 3 i am considering. interlibrary loans are your friends

albert seaton THE RUSSO GERMAN WAR 1941-9145
richard overy RUSSIA'S WAR
chris bellamy ABSOLUTE WAR SOVIET RUSSIA IN THE SECOND WAR

Никто не Забыт    (No one is Forgotten)
Ничто не Забыто  (Nothing is Forgotten)

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 5, 2016 6:20 PM

I'm halfway through "Shattered Sword". What an informative book!

Wayne, if you haven't read Heinrich's "Cross of Iron". WAY better than the movie.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    April 2006
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by waynec on Tuesday, April 5, 2016 8:11 PM

Hunter

I just finished reading "How to Model" Basic Skills and Techniques and getting ready to read Basic and Advance Airbrushing Skills and Techniques for Beginners. Dang Newbie's LOL

 

 

I still go back to the basic books from time to time, especially if I am building out of my usual armor zone.

GM I read COI decades ago. I think I have a couple of books by him. I am going to know more about the eastern front than I ever thought. May also have to build some ww2 armor.

Никто не Забыт    (No one is Forgotten)
Ничто не Забыто  (Nothing is Forgotten)

 

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Saturday, April 9, 2016 8:54 PM

Just finished a book called "The First Heroes" about the Doolittle raid.  Its interesting as it follows the crews all the way from the formation of the special group up till the end of the war.  Not a bad read. 

I really love Shattered Sword. 

John

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, April 9, 2016 10:12 PM

wolfhammer1

Just finished a book called "The First Heroes" about the Doolittle raid.  Its interesting as it follows the crews all the way from the formation of the special group up till the end of the war.  Not a bad read. 

I really love Shattered Sword. 

John

 

I actually met General Doolittle, quite by chance, eating breakfast at a diner in San Francisco. He was reading Toland's Rising Sun by himself while eating. I commented that I had read the book and considered it important to me for my education about the Pacific war. So he introduced himself and invited me to join him. Umm I was too awestruck and declined, but was able to stammer that I was indeed pleased to meet him.

I just finished "Shattered Sword", and am about to read Ballard's book about the discovery of Yorktown and later bits of Kaga.

S S was and is a great read. The authors put together a good picture of the battlefield, and also spent a lot of time tracking down the various arguments concerning the battle.

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, April 10, 2016 12:23 AM

Ballards book does not interest me. Having just skimmed it, it repeats all of the statements that Fujita made and "Shattered Sword" subsequently debunks. And a lot about Ballard.

On to helping my wife with her interest in Viet Nam.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    March 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Sunday, April 10, 2016 3:38 PM

I just finished Bill O'Reilly's "Killing Reagan". Very good and informative read. Learned a lot about Ronald and Nancy Reagan - stuff I thought was just media hype, but turns out to be very much true. As a side note, I have all five "Killing...." books. ALL are excellent reads!

I just started (last night) "Hell In The Pacific" by Jim McEnery. Nope, it's not a book of the movie that starred Lee Marvin and Toshiro Mifune in 1969. Completely different. And, I know the question already - "Aren't titles copyrighted?" Nope. The contents of the movie, book, magazine, etc., are, but titles aren't. I'll let you know soon what to expect from the book.

 

Gary

 

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Tamiya 1/32nd Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zeke For Japanese Group Build

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, April 10, 2016 9:46 PM

Tal Afar Dave
 
wolfhammer1

Just finished "A Higher Call" about Franz Stigler during WWII.  Interesting story and perspective on how there are good people on all sides of a war.  Will be starting to re-read "Battleship Bismark", written by the highest ranking surviving officer of the Bismark.  Interesting and sad story, given what happened during the sinking.

John

 

 

 

That IS a great book, John! I finished it around Christmas time and found a set of decals for the 109 and the B-17 in 1/72nd scale....a small, inflight diorama will be in the works....one day.......Embarrassed

 

TAD

 

 

I was the first to mentioned that book 2 years ago. A great read no doubt.

  • Member since
    July 2008
  • From: Vancouver, the "wet coast"
Posted by castelnuovo on Sunday, April 10, 2016 11:49 PM

"Eastern Europe" by Tomek Jankowski is a very good description of E. Europes' history for the past 2000 or so years. IMO, it is unbiased, a bit humorous and easy to read. It doesn't go into too many details but the author shows a good understanding of what/who E. Europe is and isn't and why.

"Ghosts of Medak Pocket" is a great book about a part of a war in Croatia.

"Rise and fall of Slobodan Milosevic" is excellent review of Yugoslavias' recent history, very good IMO.

"To rule the waves", lets just say I couldn't put it down. History of the importance of controling the sea from the point of the British navy.

  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: NW Washington
Posted by dirkpitt77 on Monday, April 11, 2016 12:35 PM

I recently finished "I-Boat Captain" by Zenji Orita. A very good biographical account of Orita's time in IJN submarines. He covers the Pearl Harbor attack and the role of Japanese submarines there, up to his post-war career. Especially intriguing and compelling are his discussions of kaiten suicide torpedoes and his stewardship of those missions late in the war. Highly recommended.

    "Some say the alien didn't die in the crash.  It survived and drank whiskey and played poker with the locals 'til the Texas Rangers caught wind of it and shot it dead."

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Armpit of NY
Posted by MJames70 on Wednesday, April 13, 2016 12:33 PM

GMorrison

Ballards book does not interest me. Having just skimmed it, it repeats all of the statements that Fujita made and "Shattered Sword" subsequently debunks. And a lot about Ballard.

On to helping my wife with her interest in Viet Nam.

 

 

I'm surprised you were able to finish Shattered Sword. The authors hot tears of rage that the Japanese lost the battle smear the ink on nearly every page...

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, April 13, 2016 6:53 PM

I don't agree with that at all. And doing my due diligence, there don't seem to be too many that either share or can spread any light on that view.

The most common criticism seems to be that the book relied on Japanese war records and presents the "Japanese" point of view, namely that their operational stategies as described in the book don't match the truth.

I admit some ignorance in that, as I don't know that much about the details of Japanese Military doctrine.

But the book is harshly critical of the Japanese, on quite a few points.

- That even though they would not admit this, the loss of the war was a foregone conclusion by mid 1942. Rather the plan should have been to fall back on the Home Islands and defend them for as long as possible.

- That the overall goal of the plan made no sense, in that the objective was not particularly strategic, that it was untenable over time, and that the high risk in the use of totally irreplaceable resources was not worth it.

- That the battle plan was overly complicated and internally contradictory, relying on surprise and the blunt projection of great force in the same instance.

- That the coincidence of the Aleutian Campaign was a bad division of available forces, and that neither could be considered a feint for the other.

- That the underlying goal of a massive surface gun battle had already been rendered moot the year before.

And also critical in lots of other lesser but important details, such as that the AA artillery on board the ships shot down nothing (two attacking aircraft).

The writing style was loopy, but it helped get through the book, which is long.

I thought the summary, in which the outcome was neither good luck "Miracle at Midway" stuff, nor bad luck "3 minutes to Victory" stuff, fit the facts.

About the only overt sympathy towards the Japanese that I can remember was a fair amount for the human suffering and death of several thousand Japanese, who after all were doing their jobs without putting at risk a lot of collateral civilian damage. But not out of hand.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Armpit of NY
Posted by MJames70 on Wednesday, April 13, 2016 10:43 PM

While I feel some of the points raised in it were valid, I still feel in overall tone it was an apology piece for the Japanese loss, that sought on many occasions to dismiss American skill, bravery, tactics, and strategy as a factor in the US victory in favor of 'woe is me' bad fortune to the Japanese. And in many ways was just as jingoistic as Lord's Incredible Victory, just from the opposite side. Your mileage may vary. Whether the internet agrees with me or not is not a factor in my feeling the book was overrated. 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, April 14, 2016 12:29 AM

I'm certain now that we are talking about two different books, or you haven't read the one I cited.

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

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