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Read any good books lately?

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  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Tennessee
Posted by cpd934 on Thursday, January 24, 2013 1:46 AM

I've just finished up two very good books recently. "Fighter Pilot" about Gen. Robin Olds and "Hitler's Gladiator, the life and wars of Sepp Dietrich".  Fighter Pilot is well known and has been talked about on the forums before. The book on Sepp Dietrich was interesting. It is written in an unbiased way and seems to be well researched.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, January 24, 2013 8:03 PM

I enjoyed FP too. I would like to read the book about Dietrich as I don't know too much about him. He certainly was right at the center of things throughout the whole Hitler era.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Tennessee
Posted by cpd934 on Friday, January 25, 2013 3:16 AM

GMorrison

I enjoyed FP too. I would like to read the book about Dietrich as I don't know too much about him. He certainly was right at the center of things throughout the whole Hitler era.

I didnt know a lot about him either until reading the book. The book charts his rise from an NCO in WWI throughout the rise and fall of the NAZI's. As I said earlier, it is very unbiased. It goes into what he may have known or not known about Malmedy and other war crimes, as well as Hitler's state of mind as the war went on.  Good book.

 

 

  • Member since
    August 2011
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by GreenThumb on Sunday, January 27, 2013 10:45 PM

I read about 20% of The Wild Blue and was bored to death so I stopped reading it.

Going to have to read one of the other several thousand books I have for the Kindle.

Mike

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, January 28, 2013 10:22 AM

Yeah, that story was not overly compelling. I finished up "The Guns of August" last night. Great stuff there. I now finally have some knowledge in that period of history which I never had before. I dont think one could ask more from that type of book.

Up next, "The Horse Soldiers", about the early days of SF in Afghanistan after 9/11. That and I have started "Dune" for my 'light reading' (porcelain throne) ;-)

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Sunday, February 3, 2013 3:54 PM

One book I always must recommend is "Shattered Sword" by Pearsall and Tully.  It tells the story of the battle of Midway from the Japanese side.  It also dispells the many myths surrounding the battle in a very thoughtful and well researched format.  That being said, the book reads almost like you are sitting there talking to the authors and they are letting you know their opinions as you are talking.  The appendices are almost worth buying the book for, given all of the info contained.  

Currently, I am working my way through the "Game of Thrones" series.  This is in no way light reading, given the number of characters and subplots running, but it is very vivid and detailed.  For fans of high fantasy, it is a good read.  If you have seen the HBO series, the books is all of that and more.  The series is pretty faithful to the books.  

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Sunday, February 3, 2013 4:00 PM

Quick question to the group, has anyone ever found a good book on the Tuskeegee Airmen?  I had the honor of meeting one of the ground crew several years ago and have always been amazed by the story.  Watching "Red Tails" (I know, not the best movie for plot, but the flying scenes were amazing) has whetted my appetite to have a good read and reference about the group.  Can anyone help?

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by SkippyOU110 on Saturday, March 16, 2013 1:07 AM

I just finished Hitler's U-Boat War: The Hunters, 1939-1942 by Clay Blair.  Now on to part 2, The Hunted!

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Saturday, March 16, 2013 1:02 PM

I’m reading Charlie Chan by Yunte Huang. This book is the back- story of the fictional Charlie Chan, Hawaiian cop Chang Apana.


Chang Apana (left) and Charlie Chan (Warner Oland)

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: Goffstown, NH
Posted by New Hampshire on Saturday, March 16, 2013 5:51 PM

Just finished reading a nice brace of books actually.  It started with a re-read of a classics, Cornelius Ryan's The Longest Day.  This swung me back into an ETO kind of mood.  So I went to the library and borrowed Operation Mincemeat (about the British intelligence scheme that planted fake papers on a dead body and floated it into Spain to convince the Germans the Allies planned on invading Greece and Sardinia, NOT Sicily....reads almost like a novel at times!).  The I sped through Stephen Ambrose's Pegasus Bridge, which is everything I expected from an Ambrose book!  Right now I have just started into Len Deighton's Fighter, his book on the battle of Britain.  I am probably going to also try and get his book Bomber too.  And as luck would have it my Uncle brought over 4 books for me to read also.  One was Curtis Lemay's book Superfortress, Stephen Ambrose's D-Day, a book called Two, and Bud Masterson's AAF,Official WW2 guide to the Army Air Forces.

  • Member since
    July 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Saturday, March 16, 2013 6:03 PM

Currently reading The history of german submarines and mine warfare vessels 1815-1945  by Eric Groner and  Dieter Jung. It's the 9th or 10th time I've read it.    Oooooo...... pictures.........

 Dont worry about the thumbprint, paint it Rust , and call it "Battle Damage"

  • Member since
    March 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
Posted by subfixer on Sunday, March 17, 2013 9:59 AM

wolfhammer1

One book I always must recommend is "Shattered Sword" by Pearsall and Tully.  It tells the story of the battle of Midway from the Japanese side.  It also dispells the many myths surrounding the battle in a very thoughtful and well researched format.  That being said, the book reads almost like you are sitting there talking to the authors and they are letting you know their opinions as you are talking.  The appendices are almost worth buying the book for, given all of the info contained.  

Currently, I am working my way through the "Game of Thrones" series.  This is in no way light reading, given the number of characters and subplots running, but it is very vivid and detailed.  For fans of high fantasy, it is a good read.  If you have seen the HBO series, the books is all of that and more.  The series is pretty faithful to the books.  

I will second both of wolfhammer's recommendations, especially that for Shattered Sword .

I'm from the government and I'm here to help.

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: Goffstown, NH
Posted by New Hampshire on Friday, March 22, 2013 8:53 PM

That book Superfortress by Curtis Lemay turned out to be pretty good.  A pretty quick read at only 176 pages, but a good perspective from a man who was in on the USAAF early in it's beginnings and who was intimate with the B-29 project in general.

And even though this book brought me over to the PTO, I am still in an ETO kind of mood, and as such I started re-reading The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich today.

mgh
  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Utah County, Utah
Posted by mgh on Wednesday, March 27, 2013 5:24 PM

"Darwin"s Armada" by Iain McCalman.  About Darwin, Hooker, Huxley and Wallace.  These guys were real men!  What they endured for the sake of science.  Very interesting.  

Just finished "The Mosquito Coast" by Paul Theroux.  Not everyone likes it, because the father in the story gets a little crazier as the story progresses, but I liked it.  First fiction I have read by him, his non-fiction is all good.

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Monday, April 8, 2013 9:47 PM

Just remembered another really good book, The First Team by Lundstrom.  Really good read about the beginning of the Pacific air war.  Also, just finished the latest book in the Safehold series by David Weber.  The series is an interesting mix of sci-fi and period mid-18th century wet water navy activity.  The first book in the series is called Off Armageddon Reef.  I have been really enjoying Weber's work, and have never been disappointed in one of his novels.  Anyone else like David Weber?

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, April 8, 2013 10:13 PM

I just finished "The Pacific" by Hugh Ambrose. It was written as a companion piece to the HBO series. The book includes two characters not shown in the series: one a Naval Aviator, who flew of Enterprise at Midway, Eastern Solomons and Guadalcanal, and later on in the Pacific War off the new Hornet; and the other a Marine officer who had been in the Phillipines, captured at Corregidor, later escaped from a POW camp on Mindanao, hooked up with the guerillas there and later evacuated to Australia and after recuperation time stateside went back out with the 1st Marine Division to fight at Peleliu and Okinawa. Those tales I think would have greatly improved the series, but lengthened it at least two episodes. I don't think that Hugh's work is quite a polished as his father Steven, but I sure gained a better insight into the Marines and Dive Bomber pilots war in the Pacific.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Right side of the Front row.
Posted by kirk4010 on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 9:20 PM

I just finished "The Color of War" by James Campbell (the Green Mountain Boys)

He covers the invasion of Saipan with the disaster at the Port Chicago loading facility.   He does a great job describing how horrific the fighting was at Saipan and how poorly the Navy treated the Black Sailors who were relegated only being able to load ships and not actually fight for their country.

The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving.-Ulysses S. Grant
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: West of the rock and east of the hard place!
Posted by murph on Thursday, April 11, 2013 9:32 AM

The last books I read were:

The Taliban Don't Wave by Rob Semrau - demoted and ordered to leave the Canadian Army after allegedly killing an unarmed Taliban soldier in Afghanistan

No Easy Day by 'Mark Taylor' - the book that the movie Zero Dark Thirty was based on

The Wild Blue by Stephen Ambrose - autobiographical look at Gov. George McGovern's exploits as a B-24 pilot in WWII.

@GreenThumb - while I agree The Wild Blue wasn't an extremely compelling read, I thought it was an informative book.  Gave me something to do while passing the time and catching some rays by the pool during or Florida vacation

Retired and living the dream!

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, December 30, 2014 12:57 AM

Not quite a zombie thread... More of a bump of sorts or a paddles shock to get this thread going again...

In anticipation of the  new movie, I read "Unbroken" a month or two ago. As usual when i read if Pacific War POWs, i am humbled as a man a realize how minor my problems in life are. and that guy was si much more...   Now I am working my way thru a complete collection of Sherlock Holmes that I received for Christmas last year. I really must confess how much I do enjoy Conan Doyle's writing style. Great stuff! And I got some new books for Christmas this year for when I have finished the Holmes collection...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:21 AM

I got 2 books and a DVD for Christmas. Books: Conversations with Major Richard Winters (I can't use the short version of his name LOL!) and Uncommon Valor; DVD - Last Heroes of D-Day.

I've got a few others accumulated through the years of my favorite authors - Steve Berry, Dan Brown, Matthew Reilly, etc.. I also got the latest Assassin's Creed novel as well. Looks like I've got enough books to keep me occupied for awhile.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, December 30, 2014 11:19 AM

Over the past couple of weeks, I read Walter Lord's "Day of Infamy" (an annual re-read for the anniversary of Pearl Harbor); Stephen Ambrose's "Citizen Soldiers" and "The Victors"; "The 5000-Year Leap", and since yesterday afternoon, I re-read "The Hobbit" (once again proving that Peter Jackson has ruined Tolkien by turning an enjoyable little story you can read in an afternoon into 10+ hours of dreck).

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    December 2014
  • From: Pittsburg CA
Posted by SChambers on Tuesday, December 30, 2014 11:27 AM

Read a couple not too long ago,

Warrior's Rage by Douglas Macgregor,a non fiction book about the Persian Gulf War.Very interesting to hear his opinion of some famous generals.

Tin Soldiers by Michael Farmer,a fiction book that takes place after the Persian Gulf War.Its written on the company level with some brigade level also.Very similar to Team Yankee  (MY FAVORITE BOOK).Highly recommended for anyone who enjoys modern armor fiction.

Thank you Steve

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Tuesday, December 30, 2014 12:36 PM

Stik, I agree with you about Conan Doyle and his Sherlock Holmes stories.  Great stuff there.  I think you'll like it all.  I read his complete Holmes stuff several years ago, when my kids were watching "Wishbone."

Not sure who the best film Holmes would be?

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2006
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by waynec on Tuesday, December 30, 2014 12:52 PM

honor harrington series by david weber, will be rereading books 1 and 2 of the formic wars (pre ENDER'S GAME) as the 3rd book just came out, A WARRIOR'S WAY by Avigdor Kahalani,

Никто не Забыт    (No one is Forgotten)
Ничто не Забыто  (Nothing is Forgotten)

 

G-J
  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by G-J on Tuesday, December 30, 2014 9:18 PM

I just finished reading Winter Journey Through the 9th, a history of the 9th Air Force and Tactical Air.  Franck is a great writer and really tells the story of the 9th, though beware, much of history is from D-Day forward.  Not that that is a bad thing, but I was looking for more of the history than just later history.  It is an excellent read, and I learned much about tactical air support and the end of the war.

Highly recommended.

On the bench:  Tamyia Mosquito Mk. VI for the '44 group build.  Yes, still.

On deck: 

  • Member since
    March 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Tuesday, December 30, 2014 10:03 PM

My wife bought me "Killing Patton", by Bill O'Reilly & Martin Dugard. I'm almost finished with it. Danged excellent read, as all of the "Killing......" books are.

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Tamiya 1/32nd Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zeke For Japanese Group Build

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, December 31, 2014 12:28 PM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

... I also got the latest Assassin's Creed novel as well...

Is that another novel by Robert Ferrigno?  He wrote a trilogy set in an America torn by civil war after half the country converted to Islam.  That was an interesting what-if premise.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Wednesday, December 31, 2014 12:41 PM

I'm working on the 50th anniversary edition of 'The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" by Shirer.Very dey reading,but I wanted to get thru this one.

  • Member since
    January 2014
  • From: Nampa, Idaho
Posted by jelliott523 on Wednesday, December 31, 2014 12:51 PM

I am currently reading the book Auschwitz, a very chilling and detailed account of the horrors of the Nazi Death Camps.  It is told from the views of both former SS guards and prisoners.  I have read several books and seen several documentaries about the Holocaust and I have to say that things that are in this book are told in more detail than most.

I also tend to read a lot of Civil War history books.  The last couple I've read are the book Gettysburg by Stephen Ambrose and one specifically about General Chamberlain of the 2nd Maine.  A friend of my is the author of the book and a distant relative of Chamberain's.  Its a neat read.  I'll have to look at the title again.

On the Bench:  Lots of unfinished projects!  Smile

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Wednesday, December 31, 2014 2:56 PM

Hey waynec, I am a huge David Weber fan and love his work.  Have you ever read the Safehold series by him?  To me it raises some interesting questions about faith and religion, given that it is set in a science fiction time with late 1600s technology and but with a few futuristic twists.  Could anyone recommend a good book or 2 about the Korean War?  I am starting a research kick on that time, as my dad served in combat there and I have never heard or seen much about it.  Thanks.

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