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LIS Chariot 1:35

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  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, June 17, 2024 7:39 PM

Gamera

Looks great Bakster! Glad you beat the shrinkage!!! 

Sounds good on the texture. They do make a texture paint now in spray cans. It looks like sand or something in the paint. Just spray it on the surface and you're done- it's like you put down a layer of glue and sprinkled with sand. 

 

Hey Gam, thanks. Thanks too about the spray on surface. I am interested. I will do some searching. 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, June 17, 2024 8:21 PM

Bakster

 

 
Gamera

Looks great Bakster! Glad you beat the shrinkage!!! 

Sounds good on the texture. They do make a texture paint now in spray cans. It looks like sand or something in the paint. Just spray it on the surface and you're done- it's like you put down a layer of glue and sprinkled with sand. 

 

 

 

Hey Gam, thanks. Thanks too about the spray on surface. I am interested. I will do some searching. 

 

Hey Gam, I didn't have much luck. If you know who makes it or link me to it, I will investigate. If not, that is Ok too.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, June 17, 2024 8:54 PM

Bakster, what I've been using is the Rust-oleum Multicolor Textured Caribbean Sand. It's basically as stated a sand colour but I've made asphalt by painting it dark grey and then adding a black wash. 

I normally put about two-three layers down but you can start with one and then add as it suits you. 

https://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/stops-rust/multicolor-textured

 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Tuesday, June 18, 2024 10:50 AM

Hey Gam, thanks for the additional info. I like the idea of this being a paint. I will look for it and give it a try!

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, June 19, 2024 11:38 PM

I suppose there are many ways to make rocks. Foam, bark, even natural rocks. I wanted something a little easier where it didn't require wasted time looking for the perfect pieces, or to fabricate something.

Below: I found this mold and I gave it a try. To make the casts I used the same Apoxie Clay used on the base. The stuff worked great. Mash it into the mold, let it cure, and out comes a piece with excellent detail. As well, I found the pieces easy to carve, sand, or file. 

Not sure yet how I will configure the pieces, but below is a possible option. Again, not a large footprint to work with here, options are limited.

An interesting side note. Or at least, I find it so. A few months back I re-subscribed to FSM magazine. It's been several years since I last let it lapse. The price was right, I figured, what the hey. The first issue I received had an article on dioramas. The main premace of the article is why not add a base to your model. We invest much time in our build, why not take it to another level. I wholeheartedly agree. What I found interesting is that the writer subscribed to doing them in compression. Basically, what I am doing here. Make the base a small footprint and strategically cram other elements into the scene, a sort of forced perspective. Also, the article talks about materials and interestingly, they mention Durhams, amongst other things.

I had not seen the article before starting this and to me, that is the interesting part. It's the serendipity of it. I found the article to be well done and informative.

Anyhow ... I am no expert with dioramas and for the most part, I am flying by the seat of my pants. Maybe it will look good, maybe it won't. I am keeping my expectations as low as I can.

End.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Friday, June 21, 2024 1:22 PM

Bakster
there are many ways to make rocks

The late Peter, who had posted some cool stuff in Dioramas, had a technique using crumbled coarkboard which make for some cool rocks.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, June 21, 2024 4:18 PM

CapnMac82

 

 
Bakster
there are many ways to make rocks

 

The late Peter, who had posted some cool stuff in Dioramas, had a technique using crumbled coarkboard which make for some cool rocks.

 

That is interesting, Capn. Could be good for say smaller rocks maybe.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, June 21, 2024 10:46 PM

Those are working out well! 

I really like the captian's advice too! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, June 22, 2024 3:14 PM

Gamera

Those are working out well! 

I really like the captian's advice too! 

 

Thanks, Gam.  I agree.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, June 22, 2024 4:19 PM

I went to the hardware store today. My mission was to locate the textured paint Gamera mentioned. It was quite the adventure because I forgot my glasses. The entire row is dedicated to Rustoleum. It was three passes and with blurry eyes that I finnaly located it. I am glad that I did.

I sprayed the test piece and below is the outcome. For clarity sake, the bottom third had a thin layer of Durhams, the middle third nothing, and the top third was also Durhams but I added white glue. I tested it with white glue because I was concerned that Durhams might not adhere well to the base putty. I was covering my bases. In the end, I think the concern was unfounded.

All I can say is, wow! The paint did the job and then some. So much so, I might eliminate Durhams from the equation. If anything, if I do use it, it will be for the sole purpose of altering the topography. 

So, Gam, you sir, are the man of the hour. Thanks for mentioning this. It doesn't get any easier than this.

While I continue to work on the base, I turned my attention to the track assembly. Specifically, how will I mask the rims. I knew this would be the most problematic portion of the process, and it did not disappoint. I tried cutting circular Tamiya tape masks, then vinyl tape, and lastly, Bare Metal Foil. I could not get a good result with any of those. I came closets to achieving the goal using BMF but with the wheels being recessed, it was difficult to trim. I scrapped the idea using any of the mentioned.

What I came up with was to make a circular mask using styrene. I will paint the rims, mask the front face of the wheels, paint the tracks and most of the rubber tires, then remove the masking and one by one trim out the forward facing portions of the tires using the mask tool I made. I should be able to get a nice and tight wheel rim. That's the plan.

I think from here I will prep the base for textured paint.

End.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, June 23, 2024 1:18 PM

Bakster
The entire row is dedicated to Rustoleum.

Ah, their textured line has become pretty wide.  Some of the line are available at hobby places like Jo-Ann and Hobby Lobby; but thebest selections are the big box home imporvement places.

There are someinteresting effects that can be made by using a texture paint  for the texture, then applying a finish color for the effect.

Bakster
using the mask tool I made

That's a slick method, especially given how less-than easy those tracs are for painting.

Might be worth getting some Blu-Tak to mask the tires, for being able to "mush" it around the tyre surfaces a bit better.  Dunno, it's a thought, and, possibly, a touch easier than the ten fathoms of 5mm tape wanted.  Mayb.  Perhaps.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 23, 2024 5:47 PM

CapnMac82
Ah, their textured line has become pretty wide.  Some of the line are available at hobby places like Jo-Ann and Hobby Lobby; but thebest selections are the big box home imporvement places. There are someinteresting effects that can be made by using a texture paint  for the texture, then applying a finish color for the effect.

Indeed! They offer an impressive line of paint.

 

CapnMac82
That's a slick method, especially given how less-than easy those tracs are for painting. Might be worth getting some Blu-Tak to mask the tires, for being able to "mush" it around the tyre surfaces a bit better.  Dunno, it's a thought, and, possibly, a touch easier than the ten fathoms of 5mm tape wanted.  Mayb.  Perhaps

Thanks, Capn.  Btw. That is great thinking about the Blu tack. I just came back from Menards. They don't stock that brand but they have Gorrilla brand which comes in an off white. I bought it.

 

Serendipity continues. Your timing could not have been better with the blu tack. Not only will this help with the wheels, but it may just solve another problem I stepped into. More on that in post I will do shortly. 

You guys are bringing it.  Thank you.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 23, 2024 6:16 PM

So, last night I pulled the trigger and epoxied the rocks down. In my zeal, I didn't think things through very well. I have yet to texturize the base and that means, I must mask the rocks somehow. I tested using liquid mask on scrap rocks and though that works, the mask is a major pita to remove. As a result, I decided not to go that route. It was then I read Capns post about blu-tack and the light bulb went on. Yes, try using that. I have a piece with paint curing right now. I will give that a few hours and check it then. Pretty confident that will do the trick. My biggest concern was how corrosive this paint might be. I feared it might melt these masking materials, but it didn't melt the liquid mask. So, I have a high confidence that the Gorrila tack will be fine.

End.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, June 24, 2024 7:40 PM

Glad things worked out with the paint Bakster! Yeah, I've seen some the other stuff the Captian talked about but haven't gotten around to trying it yet though. 

Good luck with the masking! I've generally just sprayed a poster board with the texture paint and then when dry glued it to a wooden base and never masked it. I hope the masking works out well. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Tuesday, June 25, 2024 9:17 PM

Gorilla tack worked well. It was a bit gummy but nothing I could not deal with. The textured paint went well too. 

Towards the end of the build I will paint the sand and rocks. With this portion now completed, I am shifting gears. I will start work on the tracks.

End.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Friday, June 28, 2024 5:25 PM

Looks good, it's all probably due to the spate of spring-like weather up there.

(It's scaring triple digits here, this last week, with heavy inversion domes to hold the humidity high, too--many complaints, but, this time last year we were into five weeks straight of 100+ )

Might be worth, on the next trip to Menards, to pick up a bag of sanded grout mix.  That dry powder has excellent texture for ground work dry, and will "set" nicely using 50/50 water/PVA glue.  A couple mounds along the track runs line wind-blown dirt might help with the present "float of the tracks.  Or not.

As wide as theose tracks are, IRL, they would "float" over most firm surfaces--whether IRL is "good modeling" is a more personal choice.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 30, 2024 12:30 PM

CapnMac82

Looks good, it's all probably due to the spate of spring-like weather up there.

(It's scaring triple digits here, this last week, with heavy inversion domes to hold the humidity high, too--many complaints, but, this time last year we were into five weeks straight of 100+ )

Might be worth, on the next trip to Menards, to pick up a bag of sanded grout mix.  That dry powder has excellent texture for ground work dry, and will "set" nicely using 50/50 water/PVA glue.  A couple mounds along the track runs line wind-blown dirt might help with the present "float of the tracks.  Or not.

As wide as theose tracks are, IRL, they would "float" over most firm surfaces--whether IRL is "good modeling" is a more personal choice.

 

Hey, Capn... thanks.  Speaking of, it has been like monsoon season here. And yesterday, it was extremely humid with temps approaching 90. Today, it is dry and barely reaching 70. Quite the change.

I like your thinking about the mounds. Initially, I considered that but I tried to minimize the track depth, visualizing a hardpack with maybe an inch of sand. That said, a few mounds along the tracks could go a long way to add a little more visual. And truth is, in nature, sand blows around creating such domes. I will add some when I circle back towards the end of the build. Thanks for that. Good thinking.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 30, 2024 12:43 PM

Work has begun on the tracks.

1. Rims painted with Alclad aluminum.

2. Vallejo washes added to the rims. 

3. Tracks painted using Tamiya Rubber Black (LP65). I like this paint. It went on well.  I thinned it some using MR Color Leveler. Probably, I didn't need to thin the paint but I like to err on the side of thin. Less airbrush trouble. Which, there were none.

 

So, at this point, I can use the tool I made and finish the tires. Probably, not today. 

End.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 30, 2024 12:47 PM

PS: I masked using tape. I didn't want to risk the gumminess of my tack. 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, June 30, 2024 8:13 PM

Well, I did it today anyhow.

The tool worked well. The main issue is getting spray into the recessed areas. Not so easy. Also, since the wheels are so close to each other, I needed to cut a cardboard scrim to move in between wheels as I go. Otherwise, overspray would have made the whole excersize a moot point.

As a result of the tight maneuvering, the paint has some shiny areas. I was going to use my Badger 200 single action for more flow control, but the darn thing would not pass paint. Something is plugged. I hate that brush. Nothing but problems when I use it. Once I weather it more and flat coat, the shinyness should get knocked down.

Anyhow, more to be done. There is yet a gear I need to paint. You can see it is still taped. It is base coated in the Alclad. I dont want it silver. In the 1:1 it is black with mounting hardware in silver. Rather than the rubber black, I want to use something else. Maybe gun metal or something. It will still look dark but it will have a subtle difference. Also, left to do, I want to add terrain dust to the assembly, and I want to dry brush the cleats in a metalic. I want them to stand out and to simulate wear.

End.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Tuesday, July 2, 2024 4:13 PM

Looking Good.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, July 4, 2024 10:27 AM

CapnMac82

Looking Good.

 

Hey thanks, Capn.  Progress. 

Have a great Independence Day celebration ...

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, July 5, 2024 9:22 PM

Looks good to me Bakster! 

And I had a Badger 200 years ago. Did not like it. I moved beyond it years ago. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, July 6, 2024 11:11 AM

Gamera

Looks good to me Bakster! 

And I had a Badger 200 years ago. Did not like it. I moved beyond it years ago. 

 

Thanks, Gam.

I must give the 200 a good soak. Not sure what is plugged. Everything looks open on it. Must be something in the body. 

For grins, I research brands and types of single action brushes. I came across a Reddit post where a guy said, why get a single action brush when you already have one with a dual action. He says, unchuck the needle, pull the needle back some, then retighten. Then just press the trigger like a single action, you should get paint.

I never thought of that. That should work.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, July 6, 2024 1:29 PM

Bakster
He says, unchuck the needle, pull the needle back some, then retighten. Then just press the trigger like a single action, you should get paint. I never thought of that. That should work.

Yeah, should work.

Mind, I find there's a lot of snobbery about dual versus single actions.  And, outside of the modeling world, there's rather a lot of "work" single actions get put through, and as a go-to choice.

Does that makes them ideal for miniature work?  Probably not.  Especially for where a person does not have the physical amount of room wanted to properly feather the spray.

A case can be made either way--and really, it's down to what a given modeler is most comfortable with.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, July 6, 2024 2:27 PM

CapnMac82

 

 
Bakster
He says, unchuck the needle, pull the needle back some, then retighten. Then just press the trigger like a single action, you should get paint. I never thought of that. That should work.

 

Yeah, should work.

Mind, I find there's a lot of snobbery about dual versus single actions.  And, outside of the modeling world, there's rather a lot of "work" single actions get put through, and as a go-to choice.

Does that makes them ideal for miniature work?  Probably not.  Especially for where a person does not have the physical amount of room wanted to properly feather the spray.

A case can be made either way--and really, it's down to what a given modeler is most comfortable with.

 

Right on, Capn.

I just tested it and it works. Interestingly, some of the same issues arise. Very quickly paint stops flowing. But, pull back on the trigger, and it clears.

And that is a big advantage over a dedicated single action. Dual action keeps the needle moving, thus keeping paint from drying. With how I used it today, it is much easier to clear the clog by just pulling the trigger. On a dedicated single action brush you'd have to loosen the needle, pull the needle back to clear it, then reset it. A much more time consuming and annoying process. For the same reasons single action require a much more precise mix of paint/thinner.

I like this methodolgy. For my purposes, it works well.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, July 6, 2024 2:32 PM

And now the gear-cog is painted with Alclad Steel. 

 

More to come.

End

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, July 7, 2024 3:43 PM

And today I added terrain dust. I used Vallejo Orange Rust thinned generously. I focused "mainly" within the track assembly. I imagined dust would get trapped and collect there the most. The camera loses some things in translation, but close enough.

 


Next up is to block out the metal cleats. Mainly, dry brushing.

End

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, July 7, 2024 11:53 PM

Rain continues around here so it is good time to keep working on this.

Cleats are coming around. Camera is not capturing some of the details and colors, but this gives you an idea where I am at.

I mentioned I was going to dry brush. Well, I was about to, when I had an epiphany. How about using a marker? I tested it, and sure enough, it got me what I wanted. The beauty of it was it was so easy. Dry brushing is easy too but I'd have to be careful about getting paint where I don't want it.

1. I used a silver Sharpie marker to paint the cleats. 

2. They were too bright at this point. So, I sanded them back until I had a good compromise.

3. I applied a sand colored wash to filter them. 

I am happy with how they turned out and the ease of it.

What will not be so easy is dealing with the interior side of the tracks. On the fence about that. I can leave them and imagine all the dust covered things up. Which, it is feasable. It does not make much sence showing shiny metal where I modeled lots of dust. I will have to ponder that one. 

Later.

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, July 8, 2024 8:18 PM

They look perfect from here Bakster!!! Yes

I think dust on the inner surfaces sounds just fine. I wouldn't worry about it too much. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

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