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Formula One Group Build 2022 - CLOSED

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  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, July 27, 2022 7:03 AM

I've finally buttoned up the chassis and cockpit, less the steering wheel. I regret not doing cloth seatbelts, other than that, I'm happy with things so far.

Moving along to the engine and back end now.

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, July 27, 2022 4:10 AM

That's some real dedication you have going there, Ben. The engine is looking great.

All that metal plus your clever scratchbuilding.....interesting to watch to say the least!

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Monday, July 25, 2022 8:55 PM

Just a quick update to show the progress I've achieved on the engine detailing.

In a previous posting I was challenging myself to come up with a solution to the large rubber ignition wire set-up. The one to the left is from the kit and shows how thick and unrealistic the plug wires look. The hybrid part on the right is the magneto top and wires that lead to the metal wire conduit. In my mind what better was to replace a rubber part that is suppose to be metal than with metal, right?

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And now the big question; how do I make the individual plug wires come out of the metal tube, between the fuel injection tubes, and over and down to the spark plug? By studying the real photos I came up with a solution using a hollow aluminum rod and solder. 

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The hollow aluminum rod will be the plug boot. It will lay over the plug and allow the solder to act as the plug wire (more to scale).

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As far as how would they go into the metal conduit, well, they will not. As you see in the photos, you cannot tell where the plug wire goes after it feed beneath the fuel injection piping. My thought is as long as they lead to the conduit, it is assumed that they feed into it. 

Here's the engine to this point:

- exhaust headers added
- some of the painted details applied
- the spark plug boots and wires added 
- each conduit and magneto cap are attached above the right and left cam covers
- the supercharger is added with custom fitting details
- brass fuel lines also added to the carbs.
- the rear transaxle hoses, couplings, and half shaft boots were added
- the fuel injection plumbing has also been added. 

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I still need to add clamps to the axle boots and hose clamps between the right and left injection lines; finish the detail painting of the nuts and bolts; add a couple more external lines on the engine block, etc. 

So, thanks for following along, let me know what you think or if you have any ideas to apply to the build.

Ben / DRUMS01

"Everyones the normal until you get to know them" (Unknown)

LAST COMPLETED:

1/35 Churchill Mk IV AVRE with bridge - DONE

NEXT PROJECT:

1/35 CH-54A Tarhe Helicopter

 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, July 24, 2022 8:22 AM

wpwar11
Greg I got the belts at Spotmodel. You have a choice from 1/2 dozen or so fabric colors. The buckles are photoetch and this set has all the belt manufactures logo's. Threading the fabric into the PE buckles can be a little tricky but nothing patience and vodka cant overcome . Thanks for the kind words.

Thank you, Paul!

Oh, and you're welcome.

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Saturday, July 23, 2022 2:45 PM

Thanks gentlemen

Greg 
I got the belts at Spotmodel.  You have a choice from 1/2 dozen or so fabric colors.  The buckles are photoetch and this set has all the belt manufactures logo's.  Threading the fabric into the PE buckles can be a little tricky but nothing patience and vodka cant overcome .  Thanks for the kind words.  

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Saturday, July 23, 2022 2:15 PM

That's some fine workmanship, Paul. YesYes

Your seatbelts/harnesses are awesome. Can you tell me what they are and where you found them? I installed my paper ones in my Lotus over the past two days, I want to go down and throw rocks at them having seen yours!

Your wiring, so far, looks just as if you knew what you're doing. Smile

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, July 23, 2022 12:01 PM

Looking good Paul!

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Saturday, July 23, 2022 8:59 AM

  Just wanted to show progress on the Lotus 99T.  My first time using wires, hoses, etc.  I think it's ok.  I still want to use about a dozen more cables and such so I'm still sorting thru that.   Definitely learning what not to do for next time.  gluing the small wires down was a challenge.  A few glue marks I don't like but I figured out a way to avoid that next time I use wires.  The kit is just great.  Enjoying the build.  

  • Member since
    July 2009
  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Back to the bench on Thursday, July 21, 2022 3:57 PM

Real G

Yes, a fascinating story!  I have never heard of a successful race car driver that competed until 60!  Were there any others?  Racing in the 1950-1960 period was fraught with accidents and death.

 

 

Paul Newman was one of the team members that won their class (and I think finished third overall) in a Roush Mustang in the 1995 Daytona 24 hours race. He was just over 70 years old and I believe he spent approximately 5 hours in the car including the last 1 hour stint. I believe his last professionally sanctioned race was run in a SCCA GT-1 class Corvette at Lime Rock. He won that race at the age of 82. I have read articles that claimed he had a problem with the cooling system in his race suit during that last race and it was a hot weekend. When interviewed after the race he reportedly said "it was tough, I wish I was 81 again"Big Smile

The dates and ages may be off by a year or so, I didn't do a lot of cross checking. Also not the level of F1 but still pretty darned amazing!

Gil

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Thursday, July 21, 2022 1:21 PM

Yes, a fascinating story!  I have never heard of a successful race car driver that competed until 60!  Were there any others?  Racing in the 1950-1960 period was fraught with accidents and death.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, July 21, 2022 11:39 AM

Thanks for the back story!

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, July 21, 2022 7:54 AM

Thanks for your kind words, Ben.

Interesting background info on Hans.

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 3:51 PM

Great save Greg, I knew you had it in you even if you were not too sure. They sure came out looking like the real deal. Like you say, the "valve" and Fitting"(?). I am in the same situation with the Auto union (no part descriptions, part numbers, color call-outs, etc.). Good skills there mate....

Hey John, I think I have to retract the 250mph. I saw that in a web site but I believe it was suppose to be 250 kph (155+ mph), not mph. The reason I say this is because the enclosed streamliner world record cars were only rising a little above 200 mph at the time and they were both more powerful and more aerodynamic. Still, with no seatbelts or zero other safety devices, I think the bug on the windshield analogoy is still on the money.

I am sharing this build on a couple other forums and was asked about Hans Stuk. Specifically, why didn't the Revival Model Company make the car for Rosemeyer, or one of the other 36-37 racers versus Stuk? Not having a solid answer I did some investigating and have this biography concerning Stuk. I think it fully explains why:

HANS STUK (King of the Mountains 1900 - 1978):

Hans Stuck was known as the 'King of the Mountains'. His forte was hill-climbing-or mountain races - but he was also an accomplished Grand Prix driver and record breaker. He competed until the early 1960s, collecting trophies and championships before finally retiring from motor sport to coach his son Hans-Joachim, who by the 1970s was one of Germany's leading racing drivers. Born in Warsaw (his parents were in business in Poland) on 7 December 1900, Hans Stuck enlisted in the artillery during World War 1. Afterwards he studied agriculture and engineering before settling down to help manage his parents' estates. His first car was a Diirkopp, little known outside Germany it was both fast and well-constructed. Hans soon set his engineering knowledge to good use modifying it for competition.

A quick road driver, his friends suggested he should compete in the Baden-Baden hill-climb in 1925, and bet him a crate of champagne he could not survive the distance! He did, and won his class. The following winter, Stuck tried his hand at ice racing while on holiday at Garmisch and won again. Then he decided to try some more famous events in 1926, entering his 2-liter Diirkopp P8B in the Salzberg and Latisbon hill-climbs and the Solitude races for fun. Again, he won his class each time. In 1927, Stuck was approached by Austro-Daimler to race one of their sports cars. Later, he graduated to a special, short-wheelbase 3-liter racing version. He won seven events in 1927, fourteen in 1928, nine in 1929 and twelve in 1930. In 1928, he was Swiss Mountain Champion, in 1929 and 1930 he was acclaimed as Austrian Mountain Champion and in 1930 he was European Mountain Champion. He was known as the 'King of the Mountains'. The crowds loved the spectacular driving style of the 6 ft 2 in blond extrovert.

In 1930, he visited Britain, and set a new course record at Shelsley Walsh. In 1931, Stuck was approached by Mercedes- Benz to drive their 7-liter SSK cars, and he won the Lemberg Grand Prix. The following year, when Mercedes withdrew, he bought his own SSK and took it to South America where he won the Brazilian Mountain Grand Prix. Upon his return to Europe, he repeated his win in the European Mountain Championship once more. In 1934, Stuck was chosen to lead the new Auto Union Grand Prix team, and soon learned how to handle the difficult, sixteen cylinder, rear-engined machines. After establishing new records for one-hour, 100 miles and 200 km on the banked Avus track in Berlin, Stuck won the German, Swiss and Czechoslovakian Grands Prix, was second in Italy and fourth in Spain. With four hill-climb victories to add to this list of achievements, he was undisputed German Champion (had there been a World Championship in pre-war times, Stuck would almost certainly have won this, too). He concluded his most successful season by taking a streamlined Auto Union to a 201 mph flying-mile record.

In 1957, Stuck joined BMW as a demonstration and racing driver. Driving a 3-liter BMW 507, he won the GT class in many hill-climbs. Later, he switched to the 700CC BMW saloon; in 1960, he won a twelve-hour race at Hockenheim with the little BMW, co-driving with Sepp Greger. In 1963, Stuck finally retired at the age of 62. He had participated behind the wheel in over 700 events during the 38 years, and won 427 times.

So, in that span of racing (more than one of the early era's), to survive let alone thrive is quite remarkable in itself. For him to create his legend in motor racing that has endured even today is exceptional. This is the drivers car I'm attempting to replicate.

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Ben / DRUMS01

"Everyones the normal until you get to know them" (Unknown)

LAST COMPLETED:

1/35 Churchill Mk IV AVRE with bridge - DONE

NEXT PROJECT:

1/35 CH-54A Tarhe Helicopter

 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 1:33 PM

Real G

Greg, if the "doo-dads" are to connect hoses, your fix will be more durable anyway.  Good job! Yes

 

Thank you, G!

Say, that is true, it will be. I hope I didn't make these things too big so they restrict the engine/rear chassis assy later!

I just realized how handy it was that some of the US kit instructions labeled parts so we knew what they were/are. As a kid, I really didn't care. I do now and would like to know what a lot model parts represent.

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 1:30 PM

jeaton01
Nice recovery, Greg. Some kind of valve handles?

Thank you, John. Smile The lower one definitely looks like a valve handle. The upper one looks more like a hose connector, as G mentions above.

jeaton01
That engine in back, 250 mph car? In a crash how is the driver not going to be a bug on a windshield!

I know! Building this model has me thinking about so many things about these cars that I have never considered before.

And not only that, I presume that is the gas tank directly behind the driver. Yikes.

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 1:25 PM

Greg, if the "doo-dads" are to connect hoses, your fix will be more durable anyway.  Good job! Yes

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 12:27 PM

Nice recovery, Greg.  Some kind of valve handles?

That engine in back, 250 mph car?  In a crash how is the driver not going to be a bug on a windshield!

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 8:24 AM

This is rather petty after Ben's scratchbuilding report above, but I'm posting it anyway.

I don't remember ever improvising or scratchbuilding anything, ever. I had a tweezer disaster last night, sent two tiny parts flying. This almost led to a new rant thread about tweezers, but......

So anyway, after spending almost 3 hrs crawling about the floor, under the bench, you all know the drill....decided to be proactive and whittled out the two little do-dads below from left over sprues and a piece of .025 piano wire.

The two do-dads are in the center of the image.

Almost time to move on to the engine, just have to finish the cockpit.

Thanks for the incentive, Ben.

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Monday, July 18, 2022 11:49 PM

JonnyK: I have to agree, while I thought it may be a little challenging, it is already becoming a monster. 

Moving on with part 2 or phase 2 of Step 1. I managed to get some photos for the parts I'm going to replicate:

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Perhaps I should've done a step-by-step picture shoot on how I made the parts:

- FRONT OF BLOCK PUMP(?) It started as an extruded plastic rod cut to the proper length. The center was drilled and small extruded plastic rod was added around the outside of the main part to replicate the contours where the bolts ran through the part. Next was adding the steps or features of the casting where I used solder for the facing and filed to shape. I still need to detail paint the bolt heads. The tube coming out of the pump is make of hollow aluminum simply cut and bent to shape with a spares fitting added to the end. 

- SIDE WATER PUMP(?): This part was a little more complex. It started as a larger size hollow plastic extruded tube. I cut and filed two holes across from each other. A similar sized hollow aluminum rod was bent to the approximate angle shown in the instructions and photo then inserted through both holes. Next was more solder built up and shaped for the external fitting. The face and rear of the pump was covered with a die round stamping of sheet plastic that was glued to main part, The facing was then drilled and a brass rode added to represent the shaft for the fully to go on. The I added the same diameter small plastic rod outside the body of the pump to replicate the contours and bolts that run through the assembly. Last a very fine precision solder was wound around a same brass rod that was used as the pull shaft. It was cut with a razor knife thus creating very fine circles. One of this circles was added to the base of the shaft for a spacer for the pully. 

Anyway, here is what I ended up with to create the three missing parts:

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All this scratch work has got me thinking of how I can improve other elements of the engine or simply add more detail. One of the first things that came to mind was the replacement of the rubber ignition lines and conduit. The kist hat a rather thick ignition line leading into a rubber conduit that is suppose to be metal. The kit part looks terrible, but I may use part 9or none) of the rubber along with a polished aluminum conduit replacement. At this point I'm still brain storming.

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As you can tell by the last engine photo, I've also began painting the engine. There is still much to do with the ignition lines, file injection assembly, other hoses, the entire supercharger, the exhaust headers, detail painting, etc. Here are some detail images of the real engine to give you an idea what I'm working towards:

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And here is a photo of the interior body reinforcements I may replicate after filling in the ejection pin marks and seams:

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I've also been cleaning up the tube chassis and its corresponding supports and brackets while the paint dries on the engine. 

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It's hard to believe there were men willing to sit on this chassis with zero safety standards and half their body exposed going over 250 MPH. I can only imagine that the braking points with those skinny tires were W-A-Y longer that what we see today. Thank goodness they had that large windscreen to protect them (just kidding... that was a joke):

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I should have more to show tomorrow.

Ben / DRUMS01

"Everyones the normal until you get to know them" (Unknown)

LAST COMPLETED:

1/35 Churchill Mk IV AVRE with bridge - DONE

NEXT PROJECT:

1/35 CH-54A Tarhe Helicopter

 

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, July 18, 2022 1:50 PM

I enjoy building challenging kits, but this kit does not look like a fun build. Good luck with this one.

Your comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, July 18, 2022 8:03 AM

keavdog
Looks like a lot of work and a bit of a different skill set.

I was thinking the same.

keavdog
What do you fill with?

Ditto that.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, July 17, 2022 7:54 PM

Maybe not so fun... Tongue Tied.  Looks like a lot of work and a bit of a different skill set.  What do you fill with?  I guess bondo would work.  Still fun to watch the build of this car.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Sunday, July 17, 2022 7:40 PM

Moving to phase 2 of part 1 in the instructions problems occurred right away. 

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Specifically, the casting sprue that contained the fuel pump (the item in front of the engine block), the fuel pick-up tube (the item attaching to the fuel pump, and the water pump (the item that inserts in the left front of the engine block that also has a fully with belts), are all missing from the kit. This is now the third Revival kit in a row that has one or more parts missing (?), so I question the quality control of Revival in general. Now I am researching the details of the real parts so I can scratch build them.

So at this point I am stuck in phase2 of part 1 until I can find detailed images or drawings of those parts. That gave me time to start looking at other parts a little closer; here is what I found out:

(a) The main body has a heavy seam through the top center running the entire length front to back.

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(b) Every body part will need attention to remove ejection pin marks, tabs, etc.

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(c) The engine cover has a couple tabs molded into one of the sides and the thickness from one side or the panel to the other is grossly inconsistent (see photo). And yes, this does impact the fit of the engine cover on the body.

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(d) The front cover not only has ejection pin marks, but also flash inside the vent that needs cleaning. I would've thought the flash should've been removed prior to painting the part (?).

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(e) The seam between the upper body and the belly pan is not uniformed, flat, but instead partially rounded which causes gaps between both.

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(f) The water, and fuel tanks are made of plastic and have large seam issues when assembled. Also the tube chassis has seams and ejection pin marks to be resolved.

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(g) And the rubber / flexible hoses show fittings, junctions, and cylinders molded in within the instructions but they are not on the part or a separate themselves. These fittings and cylinders will need to be scratch built. In addition the instructions do not show where the transaxle hoses join with the axle boot covers (?) or that they show attached to the side of the transaxle but there is no means or direction to do that on the model kit.

(h) There is no molded in details inside the body work but actual source photos show reinforcement ribs and joints that will also need to be scratch built to authentically replicate the real car. 

With all this said, I am locating the detail pictures and will be working those areas before moving forward.

Till next time...

Ben / DRUMS01

"Everyones the normal until you get to know them" (Unknown)

LAST COMPLETED:

1/35 Churchill Mk IV AVRE with bridge - DONE

NEXT PROJECT:

1/35 CH-54A Tarhe Helicopter

 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Saturday, July 16, 2022 8:55 AM

I'm worn out from you putting that engine block together, Ben.

You've reminded me of a cast classic car I tried to build as a kid. Never got anywhere at all with it. Had no idea what to do, really.

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Friday, July 15, 2022 7:48 PM

Thanks everyone for the great words. I can only hope to earn them through this build. 

Greg: They are no where near as difficult as the Pocher 1/8 kits, but they are plenty challenging enough in thier own right. I look forward to your next Lotus update. As for the backwards steering wheel, you know the Germans had a "thing" going on back then, so that most likely explains the unique engineering. Plus remember that these cars were originally designed by Dr. Porsche all the way back in 1933. If I remember correctly, Porsche finally made a successful series of rear engine cars. Wink

Well, prior to starting the build I always recommend you study and inventory of any Revival kit. Fortunately for me Revival's part 1 to step 1 is rather simple as far as parts counts go. Revival was also thoughtful to keep all the small parts needed for part 1 in one small bag which minimized the searching for parts (especially since they are not numbered or marked other than the bag itself). 

Next is to take out the necessary tools needed to complete a Revival kit; files, sandpaper, and various jewelers screwdrivers and pliers and snips (along with the regular modeling stuff). 

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Every part in part 1 of step 1 is made in cast metal. This means that every part will need considerable filing and cleaning to remove flash and ejection pin marks. I recommend taking special attention to all mating surfaces and holes or cutouts for future items. While thin flash can be removed by a dull hobby knife, the larger areas and those connected at the sprue point will need filing. 

One neat thing I noticed was the internal axles inserted inside and protruding as screws out of the transaxle are made of brass and they articulate, good job and kudo's to Revival. Here is what I'm referring to.

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To attach the engine / transaxle sides together it requires two very small screws. How small you say? Just the typical Revival type of screw...... look.

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I cannot stress how important it is to test fit and clean and true everything prior to assembly. If you do not there will be gaps or parts laying crooked within assemblies. Both screw holes are then covered with plugs glued in representing an engine or transaxle part. 

Once the halves were screwed together I also dropped some CA cement into the inside seams of the block which filled the small gaps. Now take another look at the engine halves and true the sides to one another by filing, which will also removed the stepped seams in the cast metal. The top part of the engine is attached by a long screw through the bottom of the oil pan and up into a joint under the top engine head and intake. The kit does not provide any fill for that screw, but I will make an oil drain plug to cover it from spares.

The left, right, and center camshaft covers are attached by glue. Again filing and truing the parts for a flush fit will be necessary. In fact, the center cam cover was bent by at least 1/32 inch so careful pressure and bending was needed for the correct fit.

In the photo below you can see some of the filing done to the transaxle casing. It still needs further work to remove the file marks. Then there's also the need for some scratch detailing on top of the transaxle and perhaps some bolt heads on the intake and other areas; and later on to painting. 

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Next update will be paint, then part 2 step 2. Till then, comments or constructive input is welcome.Yes

Ben / DRUMS01

"Everyones the normal until you get to know them" (Unknown)

LAST COMPLETED:

1/35 Churchill Mk IV AVRE with bridge - DONE

NEXT PROJECT:

1/35 CH-54A Tarhe Helicopter

 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, July 15, 2022 9:50 AM

Ben, that looks like quite a project. And based on your description, a challenge as well.

The packaging reminds me of the classic Pocher kits back in the 60's/70's.

I wonder if they know they have the steering wheel facing the wrong way?? Smile

Meanwhile, I've been away for a week and am looking forward to getting back to my Lotus build at home.

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Thursday, July 14, 2022 9:27 PM

Monster car and kit!

John

To see build logs for my models:  http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.html

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Thursday, July 14, 2022 9:05 PM

Man that looks like a fun kit!

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Thursday, July 14, 2022 7:21 PM

Ben,

That is a stunning model you have chosen for the GB - and SIX WHEELS!  Yes  I love it already,

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Thursday, July 14, 2022 5:38 PM

Finally opened the box for my build, 1/20 Revival multi media model of the 1936/37 Tipo "C". Here is a brief history about the pre-war Auto Unions (Wikipedia):

The Auto Union Grand Prix Racing cars, types A to D, were developed and built by a specialist racing department of Auto Union's Horch works in Zwickau, Germany, between 1933 and 1939, after the company bought a design by Dr. Porsche in 1933.

Of the 4 Auto Union racing cars, the Types A, B and C, used from 1934 to 1937 had supercharged V16 engines that developed almost 620 horsepower. All of the designs were difficult to handle due to extreme power/weight ratios (wheelspin could be induced at over 100 mph (160 km/h)), and marked oversteer due to uneven weight distribution (all models were tail heavy). The Type D was easier to drive because of its smaller, lower mass engine that was better positioned toward the vehicle's center of mass.

Between 1935 and 1937, Auto Unions won 25 races. Auto Union proved particularly successful in the 1936 and 1937 seasons. Their main competition came from the Mercedes Benz team, which also raced sleek, silver cars. Known as the "Silver Arrows", the cars of the two German teams dominated Grand Prix racing until the outbreak of World War 2 in 1939.

For 1936, the engine had grown to the full 6 litres, and was now producing 620 bhp (460 kW); and reaching 258 mph (415 km/h) in the hands of Rosemeyer and his teammates, the Auto Union Type C dominated the racing world. Rosemeyer won the Eifelrennen,  German, Swiss and Italian Grands Prix and the Coppa Acerbo (as well as second in the Hungarian Grand Prix). He was crowned European Champion (Auto Union's only win of the driver's championship), and for good measure also took the European Mountain Championship. Varzi won the Tripoli Grand Prix (and took second at the Monaco, Milan  and Swiss Grands Prix). Stuck placed second in the Tripoli and German Grands Prix, and Ernst Von Delius took second in the Coppa Acerbo. In 1937, the car was basically unchanged and did surprisingly well against the new Mercedes W125, winning 5 races to the 7 of Mercedes-Benz. 

My build will represent the dual rear wheeled 1936 car championed my Hans Stuk during the hill climbing events. 

For those not knowledgible of the Revival brand of model kits, they make a economy level kit with plastic wheels and bodies, and a high end kit with metal pre-painted bodies, full metal chassis and running gear, and beautiful metal spoked wire wheels; the kit I'm building is the latter. 

The box comes with a nice photo of the completed model on the top:

After taking the cardboard box top off, you see this (covered in a plastic shell):

While the large instruction book is nice, underneath the instructions is better:

Here are the little parts:

The large metal bags of parts:

Plastic:

Dually wheels and decals:

The four major complaints with the Revival kits are (a) the lack of accurate details, (b) many large mold or casting lines and flash on all metal parts, (c) many instances where the applied paint on the bodies bubble or flake off, and (d) extreme difficulty putting the rubber wheels over the metal inner liners. Oh!, and one other thing with the Revival kit line is the inconsistant engineering quality from kit to kit. While some build beautifully, some are much more difficult to fit correctly. Other than the mold lines and flash I hope to not run into any of the other issues during the Auto Union build, but at least it will not be a surprise if I do.

The instructions sheet is laid out in typical Revival manner, meaning if you are expecting part by part arrow and written instructions and paint call outs you will be disappointed:

I've built several Revival Grand Prix kits over the years, so I think I know what to expect. Up next, the build starts....

Ben / DRUMS01

 

"Everyones the normal until you get to know them" (Unknown)

LAST COMPLETED:

1/35 Churchill Mk IV AVRE with bridge - DONE

NEXT PROJECT:

1/35 CH-54A Tarhe Helicopter

 

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