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DML Grille H Smart Kit WIP *COMPLETE Pics p.9* 05-03-09

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  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 6:29 PM
Thanks MR! For the dunkelgelb I used a 50-50 mix of enamel Model Master Dunkelgelb and Light Gray. I used to only lighten it with 20% Light Gray but decided after some trial and error that more was needed to get the desired result.
  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: N.H.
Posted by panzerguy on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 8:24 PM

   Wow bill looks like I missed a little bit while I was gone.Shock [:O]

   That cammo is really cool. I think I might have read somewhere that this was called a tortoise shell pattern. It does kind of remind me of a turtle.

 Interesting that you paint the tracks before the glue has completely dried. Do you ever have a problem with the tracks coming apart?

  Looking forward to seeing this guy with some Russian dust on itWink [;)].

    

"Happiness is a belt fed weapon"

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Rain USA, Vancouver WA
Posted by tigerman on Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:22 PM
Loving your work so far Bill. The camo scheme is so nice and fresh from the tri-color.

   http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y269/wing_nut_5o/PANZERJAGERGB.jpg

 Eric 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Wednesday, April 22, 2009 9:39 AM

Thanks Steve! The "tortoise" designation sounds as plausible to me as anything else...I've heard it referred to as a "giraffe" scheme when seen on the Ferdinands, "web" scheme, or even just simply "green stripes" scheme depending on who's doing the reaching for a handy name for it! Laugh [(-D] I guess that's the limitation we deal with in trying to attach a descriptor to what was really a non-standard type of thing.

As for the tracks, the only time I encounter a problem with the links trying to separate is if either 1) there hasn't been enough time for the glue to set properly or 2) I try to handle too long of a run and it comes apart due to weight/strain. Normally #1 is taken care of simply by the amount of time it takes to assemble, paint, and then install the tracks. In this particular case, it took me about 45 minutes to get the links all together once I'd started gluing (I clean up all the links first to cut down on the time) then another 30 minutes or so to do the painting, dry brushing, wash, etc. By the time I'm ready to install the links, they've been glued together for anywhere from 30 minutes to 75 minutes (I build the "solid" run for the lower portion first since it will have set the longest) and that's usually plenty to keep them together but still allow them to be flexible enough to fit around the sprockets/idlers and introduce sag with the toothpick method.

Eric thanks for the comments as well! While we all know and accept that "three tone" ruled the day from Feb '43 onward there are a lot of "exceptions" to the rule where only olivegrun or rotbraun were used over the dunkelgelb, usually due to prevailing Spring or Fall conditions and unit preferences, so there's room for variety even within the confines of the three-tone approach. The Kursk timeframe in particular provides a huge variety of schemes depending on the unit, vehicle type, and location. Glad you like it! Wink [;)]

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Sunday, April 26, 2009 8:27 PM

Originally I had thought that I would get everything completed this weekend on this particular project but, as it turned out, I didn't quite make it as far as I'd hoped. The first order of business was to add the last detail in the form of the radio antenna and get it painted up and installed. I applied a sealing coat of Future by airbrush and let it thoroughly dry for 1 hour before applying the kit-supplied decal markings. The markings were treated with Solvset and then a second sealing coat of Future applied. The second coat was allowed to cure overnight before the weathering process began. The markings were pretty straightforward, just the balkenkreuze on the superstructure sides and hull rear along with the LAH insignia front and back.

The first step was to apply an overall light wash of enamel Raw Umber using a #1 round sable brush.

That laid the foundation for the next round, the application of dot filters. The arsenal for that consisting of enamel Panzer Olivegrun, Deep Yellow, Flat White, and Military Brown, and a mixing bottle of clean thinner. 

The first dot filter used the Olivegrun, Deep Yellow, and Flat White to introduce some color variation and fading to the underlying paint scheme. Small dots of paint were applied in sections, working slowly around the vehicle one section at a time, and the dots blended in and away with a flat tipped brush dampened with clean thinner.

This was followed by the second dot filter using the Military Brown. This was applied with fewer dots and the initial blending done the same way as with the previous filter. To introduce/simulate dust/dirt streaking due to rain and prolonged exposure, I turned the flat tip brush 90 degrees and used repeated strokes to produce the desired amount of streaking.

Because all of this work involves working with thinner, I wore a paint breather mask the entire time even with the excellent air circulation at my work bench as a standard precaution.

Once that was complete, a pin wash of enamel Burnt Umber was applied to all the raised detail using a pointed 3/10 brush. Excess wash was carefully removed using the same brush and clean thinner to tighten things up. The Burnt Umber was was also applied to the road wheels and running gear in anticipation of the application of pigments, something that was scheduled for today but I didn't quite get to.

I will let this sit for a few days and then come back to it with a fresh set of eyes to evaluate if additional adjustments are needed before sealing it up with a flat coat and starting in on the final pigment weathering.

Total Session Time: 7.25 hours

Total Time to Date: 71.25 hours

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, April 26, 2009 11:17 PM
Very nice...do you usually use enamels for the "dot" treatment or do you alternate with oils???
  • Member since
    December 2005
  • From: Syracuse, NY
Posted by lexesbenz on Sunday, April 26, 2009 11:36 PM
Looking good Bill.
The flying hamster of doom rains coconuts on your pitiful city!!!!
  • Member since
    January 2012
Posted by I make stuff on Monday, April 27, 2009 12:26 AM

That's looking mighty fine, Bill.  I really like seeing the factory fresh scheme become more real with your methods, it really helps me moderate my colors when I paint my own projects to see examples of what washes do to the base coats.

Bill

  • Member since
    May 2006
  • From: Queensbury,NY
Posted by panzer88 on Monday, April 27, 2009 7:05 AM
Looking great!!!!

     

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: N.H.
Posted by panzerguy on Monday, April 27, 2009 8:59 AM

  At first I thought this thing was a little homely looking but not any more.

I think will have to start calling your wips Wbill's Extreme Makeover, Panzer additionBig Smile [:D].

  I've put off trying the dot method but I think I'll give it a go on my 251/22 build.  

"Happiness is a belt fed weapon"

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Monday, April 27, 2009 9:45 AM

Anthony, David, thanks for the comments!

Bill, thanks for the kind words and glad this is helpful. I experiment a lot with different colors depending on the underlying basecoat/camo colors and the effect I'm after. I've recently started playing around more with the layering effect and so far am happy with the results.

Steve, definitely recommend you give this method a whirl! It's extremely versatile and can yield some pretty good results right out of the gate. I like the "Panzer Makeover" line, good thing I wasn't drinking anything when I read it! Laugh [(-D] The Grille H is a squat/squarish little gun buggy but that's also part of its appeal, to me at least! Wink [;)]

 Mansteins revenge wrote:
Very nice...do you usually use enamels for the "dot" treatment or do you alternate with oils???

MR, I use the enamels as a rule vs. oils. The enamels have a shorter work time in terms of the dots so you have to work in smaller sections at a time as a result. I've found that to be an advantage in the sense that I can keep it all manageable and avoid rushing/fatigue and also not have to wait long periods of time for drying in between applying the filters. 

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Everett, WA
Posted by Schnobs on Monday, April 27, 2009 10:19 AM

Bill,

As is your standard the build and the build log are brilliant!  I really like your step by step method it's like looking over your shoulder and much appreciated.  The paint job is awesome!

 

"There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance. That principle is contempt prior to investigation." Herbert Spencer
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Monday, April 27, 2009 11:43 AM
Thanks Edmund! So it's you who's been creating the "I'm being watched" feeling I get from time to time? Now I know who to blame. Laugh [(-D]
  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Monday, April 27, 2009 12:19 PM

Bill - Very nice work along with your usual excellent explaintion. Love the photos of the dot filters.

Sounds like you need a paint booth/vent hood in the bench area.....

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    November 2006
  • From: Coastal Maine
Posted by dupes on Monday, April 27, 2009 12:50 PM

Bill - somehow I've completely missed your updates on this thread...where the heck have I been? Confused [%-)]

Looks great! Whether it's the "web" or whatever you want to call it, very cool scheme. Thumbs Up [tup]

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Monday, April 27, 2009 1:18 PM

Marc, better late than never! Thanks for the comments and for dropping by. Wink [;)]

 redleg12 wrote:

Sounds like you need a paint booth/vent hood in the bench area.....

Mike, as much as I would love to add a paint booth to the bench area, the configuration of the room doesn't allow for it. It's something I've looked into and tried to come up with various ways I could incorporate one but nothing ever seems to quite work out. So I open up the windows, use the cieling fan, and wear the breather mask. It doesn't cause a problem for the rest of the house in terms of fumes because I'm not airbrushing. I'm the one affected because I'm usually working inches away from the surface and using raw thinner at the same time! Laugh [(-D]

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Monday, April 27, 2009 3:08 PM
 wbill76 wrote:

Marc, better late than never! Thanks for the comments and for dropping by. Wink [;)]

 redleg12 wrote:

Sounds like you need a paint booth/vent hood in the bench area.....

Mike, as much as I would love to add a paint booth to the bench area, the configuration of the room doesn't allow for it. It's something I've looked into and tried to come up with various ways I could incorporate one but nothing ever seems to quite work out. So I open up the windows, use the cieling fan, and wear the breather mask. It doesn't cause a problem for the rest of the house in terms of fumes because I'm not airbrushing. I'm the one affected because I'm usually working inches away from the surface and using raw thinner at the same time! Laugh [(-D]

DAMM.....I wish I could help.....but, this explains why you are..the way you are  Whistling [:-^]

Over the years in my line of work and all the solvents I have delt with....my brain puts me in the catagory of Sign - With Stupid [#wstupid]

Wink [;)]

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    June 2008
  • From: Iowa
Posted by Hans von Hammer on Monday, April 27, 2009 3:11 PM
I don't bother going into MOPP 4 for painting...  It's nefer aflected mee yett...

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: League City, Texas
Posted by sfcmac on Monday, April 27, 2009 3:27 PM

 I really like the effect of the dot wash! I too thought it was eclusively for oil paints but you have proved that wrong!

 I have 2 big window fans in two windows that are  right next to my bench. I turn them on to blow outside and it gets rid of the dust and the fumes. Even pulls up my directions sometimes but I don't smell a thing.  I did spill a whole jar of Mr Surfacer 500 once and it even overcame them. I had to leave the room for a couple hours cuz man that stuff is potent!

 Think it made my hair grow out really fast Hans! Laugh [(-D]

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Monday, April 27, 2009 6:07 PM

Aaron, thanks for the comments. While the dot filter method is commonly associated with oils, I've never had any problems using the same method with enamels. Enamels have a lot of common qualities with enamels but with a shorter drying time.

Mike, HvH , I've learned my lesson about getting non-alcoholic induced hangover headaches the morning after a long modelling session! Laugh [(-D]

  • Member since
    August 2008
  • From: S.W. Missouri
Posted by Pvt Mutt on Monday, April 27, 2009 6:13 PM

Dang-it Bill would you quit running your mouth and get on with.Smile,Wink, & Grin [swg]

Listen to me,you would think i'm anxious or something.Big Smile [:D]

Tony the Mutt

Shoot Low Boys They're Ridin Ponys

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Monday, April 27, 2009 6:14 PM
Sorry Tony...you'll have to wait to the next weekend for this one to get finished...patience, patience! Propeller [8-] Laugh [(-D]
  • Member since
    February 2008
  • From: ladner BC Canada
Posted by stick man on Monday, April 27, 2009 6:38 PM

Very nice Bill! I can't wait till I can get this kit.

Smile [:)]

I'm 15 and I model I sk8board and I drum what could be better.
  • Member since
    June 2008
  • From: Iowa
Posted by Hans von Hammer on Monday, April 27, 2009 6:48 PM
 wbill76 wrote:

 

Mike, HvH , I've learned my lesson about getting non-alcoholic induced hangover headaches the morning after a long modelling session! Laugh [(-D]

Never had a headache, but my wife says that I can't stay focused on anything... I tell her she's wrong, I'm fine and that...Oh look, there's a bunny outside the window..

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Monday, April 27, 2009 8:57 PM

Thanks Orion! It's got some tricks up its sleeves but nothing that would make it too tough to build, look forward to seeing what you do with it when the time comes.

HvH, chasing butterflies (or bunnies)...that's the ticket! Wink [;)]

  • Member since
    May 2005
  • From: Dublin Rep Of Ireland
Posted by terry35 on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 3:21 PM

Hi, Bill the build is comming along great. Can't say much more, except brilliant. The book arrived and I enjoyed it, thanks for the recommendation.

Terry.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 5:21 PM
 terry35 wrote:

Hi, Bill the build is comming along great. Can't say much more, except brilliant. The book arrived and I enjoyed it, thanks for the recommendation.

Thanks Terry for the comments and my pleasure on the book recommendation. Thumbs Up [tup]

  • Member since
    April 2007
  • From: Schroon Lake, NY
Posted by SMJmodeler on Friday, May 1, 2009 9:34 AM

Bill: I was reading a German book from a bookclub I just joined and saw a vehicle that looked like an elefant...I think this is it!  What is the full name of this beast?...I'd like to confirm it... 

I like the camo work, I'll have to scroll back and read how you did that!  I noticed you used the "dot" technique and then used a brown color for the dirt/dust streaks.  Do you ever deviate from the brown, or is that your color of choice due to the fact that the streaks could be "browned' by the small flakes of worn metal?  OR, do you just choose brown based on the color of the vehicle?  I have seen/used buff in a similar fashion and wanted to know a little more about your selection...

By the way, I have a new appreciation for your interior work after the amount of time I have spent on my 251 Stuka Zu Fuss...It sure adds more time and much more planning to sequence the painting process correctly.  Not to mention, PE work, seat painting, mortar/shell sanding, etc...

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Friday, May 1, 2009 10:33 PM

Steve, appreciate the comments and hope you get the chance to scroll through the earlier posts! Wink [;)]

The full name will vary depending on the source but the official designation for this vehicle was 15cm sIG 33 (Sfl.) auf Pz.Kpfw. 38(t) Ausf H or simply Sdkfz 138/1. Modelers commonly refer to it as the "Grille" H but that was never an official designation for this particular vehicle. Dragon, for some reason, chooses to call it the Sdkfz 138/1 Geschutzwagen 38 H fur sIG 33/1 but I honestly don't know where they got that from. As far as looking like an elefant, I guess that would depend on the picture you saw! Laugh [(-D] This particular vehicle is actually pretty small in size compared to the Elefant tank destroyer platform.

As for your question on the weathering, I can and do deviate from the brown depending on the look I'm after. I used brown in this case because it's going to be a close match to the pigment weathering I'm going to apply to the lower hull, running gear, and tracks and so will help tie in the overall weathered look of the vehicle so that it all makes sense in the end. The intention here is to show dirt streaking on the slab sided panels and not streaking due to rust or chipped metal.  When I'm looking for a lighter color I will often go with Raw Sienna or a lighter tan/sand depending, it's something that I play around with and am not "set" on using all the time. In this particular case, because there's no brown in the camo scheme, it also contrasts a bit better against the dunkelgelb/green combination IMHO.

Working on a vehicle with an open top/interior combination definitely adds to the work load and planning required. Glad to see you branching out and looking forward to seeing your results. Thumbs Up [tup]   

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Saturday, May 2, 2009 10:52 PM

Picking up from where I left off last week, I made a few minor adjustments here and there in the previous pin wash work and decided that a little something more was called for. Given the fact that the fighting compartment sides extend right to the edge of the fenders, I decided to add some slight scratching to the previous weathering. To do this, I used the 50-50 dunkelgelb/light gray mix from before and an 18/0 Script brush to add in the marks where desired. I followed this up with a slightly dampened square tip blender brush and carefully worked the scratching into the rest of the finish on both sides.

The next step was to seal everything in with an overall coat of Testors Lusterless Flat lacquer in the spray can. This was left to thoroughly dry for an hour or so before starting in on the pigment weathering.

I mixed up a batch of 50-50 Mig Dark Mud and Europe Dust pigments as a dry powder in an old prescription bottle lid until they were thoroughly combined. Water was added to create a wet mixture and the mixture then applied to the lower hull, running gear, and tracks with a round 0 sable brush and allowed to air dry. After an hour or so, I donned a sanding/dust mask (reminded me of the H1N1 footage on TV!) to avoid inhaling pigment dust and began the fine-tuning process by removing the excess pigment using a square tipped stiff bristled brush.

The next step involved the removal of even more pigment, this time using a Q-tip moistened with water. This allows for a more strategic removal and blending process along with a dry Q-tip end to get a varied look to the pigment application. The Dark Mud is a powerful pigment, capable of staining all by itself and is the main reason I pair it up with the lighter Europe Dust pigment to prevent a too-dark end result. The Q-tip treatment is applied to all the road wheels, sprockets, idlers, and return rollers as well as the track faces themselves.

The final touch was a light dry brushing of Steel to bring out some of the contact points on the guide horns and track faces.

Tomorrow I'll do the walk-around photo inspection to see if there's anything else I missed or need to adjust before this one is marked down as complete.

Total Session Time: 4.25 hours

Total Time to Date: 75.50 hours

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