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Dragon 1/35 M46 WIP

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  • Member since
    July 2010
  • From: Tempe AZ
Posted by docidle on Friday, September 4, 2020 1:17 AM

Stik,

I just found this thread. Outstanding work there sir! I really like everything about it but especially the Tiger or Dragon paint job, very impressive.

I took the plunge this summer and built eight tanks to get my *** back. I’m not sure if I’ll post the picures, but I now know the path to the Dark Side... or Heavy Metal, whichever you prefer.

Steve

       

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, September 3, 2020 11:00 AM

BrandonK

That is just too cool. Not sure I could even think of pulling this off. Awesome artwork for sure.

BK

 

Thank you Brandon. Its not as hard as you think. Just take it in stages. Base color, then secondary colors.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Thursday, September 3, 2020 9:03 AM

That is just too cool. Not sure I could even think of pulling this off. Awesome artwork for sure.

BK

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, September 3, 2020 12:25 AM

Thanks PJ. Some day down the road I’d like to do one of the Korean War E8 Sherman’s in the Tiger scheme also.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Wednesday, September 2, 2020 11:16 PM

That is really a very unique paint scheme indeed and the oil wash pops all the details really good. That is one of the coolest looking paint jobs I have ever seen on a tank.  Beer

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, September 2, 2020 3:21 PM

Gamera, Graysnake, Harold, thank you all for your kind words. I'm happy to hear that you guys like how this is turning out.

Harold, I do like the Korean War “tiger“ tanks. Such a unique and “look at me” bit of tank paint schemes. I am pretty sure that each tank was painted by its own crew, so that accounts for the variation in looks. Here is a link to a blog page with a good rundown on all the units involved.

https://mikesresearch.com/2019/02/24/operation-ripper-korea-1951/

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Wednesday, September 2, 2020 2:49 PM

stikpusher

 

Carlos, since you started his model I have taken an interest in the history of this cat like face and looked at dozens of pictures. None of the faces are the same and your paint work is the most fierce looking of them all.

It turns out that making faces at your enemies as you enter into battle has been done for thousands of years. It is believed it serves two purposes, one is to put fear in the mind of your enemy and the other is to build your own confidence in battle. The traditional New Zealand Maori face Haka War look is the most recent example of this devil-demon-monster-dragon impression. It is intended to convey the idea that he will not only kill you, but that he will eat you too.

Harold

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: AZ,USA
Posted by GreySnake on Friday, August 28, 2020 8:57 PM
The M46 is looking amazing. The oil wash really helped bring out the detail.

 
  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, August 26, 2020 9:35 AM

Love that SP! 

 Heart

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, August 24, 2020 7:50 PM

I’m back to work on this one too! Over the weekend I applied and cleaned up an oil wash.

 

 

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, July 30, 2020 11:42 AM

Great job there SP! The tiger face came out perfectly!!! Yes

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, July 29, 2020 4:50 PM

Yes, either jump boots or the M-1948 boots mentioned in the Olive Drab article. Those had a capped toe also. 

I still have my Corcorans. But they could use a new heel and front sole. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Wednesday, July 29, 2020 4:32 PM

stikpusher

 

Carlos, your TC figure appears to have Corcoran jump boots just like I wore in the Army.

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Wednesday, July 29, 2020 4:25 PM

M1GarandFan

Harold, those Corcoran jump boots look just like the ones in my closet that I bought in 1973 at the RAF Mildenhall BX. My original issue boots were too beat up to take a shine, and the Corcoran's were really comfortable.

 

I agree John, they were very comfortable and looked sharp with the toe caps nicely spit-shined.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Wednesday, July 29, 2020 3:37 PM

Harold, those Corcoran jump boots look just like the ones in my closet that I bought in 1973 at the RAF Mildenhall BX. My original issue boots were too beat up to take a shine, and the Corcoran's were really comfortable.

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Tuesday, July 28, 2020 1:42 PM

HooYah Deep Sea

I wore Corcoran jump boots while in the navy in the late '70's. They fit better than the boondockers and they looked like they had steel toes which was starting to be a requirement back then. I couldn't wear steel toes due to a motorcycle accident and left foot then out of calibration.

 

Welcome HooYah, I haven't seen your call sign on the Armor Forum before. Central Oregon is one of my favorite places, I love to fly fish. I was a Tin Can sailor from 1963 to 1969, wore boondockers most of that time. They were an ugly old boot, no pun intended.

Harold

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Tuesday, July 28, 2020 12:27 PM

I wore Corcoran jump boots while in the navy in the late '70's. They fit better than the boondockers and they looked like they had steel toes which was starting to be a requirement back then. I couldn't wear steel toes due to a motorcycle accident and left foot then out of calibration.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Monday, July 27, 2020 10:17 PM

CapnMac82

But the field gear stayed brown until during VN.  Which then started in a bunch of over-dying of existing leather, with mixed results.

SF & Ranger units started using black boots in the 60s, which may have started a trend.

 

CapnMac82, when I joined the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, I wore jump boots instead of standard issue. It was not required, but they fit better and looked sharp, a lot of men had them in the 60's and 70's.

Harold

  U.S. Army Paratrooper Jump Boots

 

Vietnam era Standard issue U.S. Army Boots

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, July 27, 2020 9:23 PM

I had a nice long detailed reply typed up, but when I went to get a photo and come back, the typical site FUBAR action wiped it out and logged me off.

 

Pathetic. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, July 27, 2020 8:12 PM

No doubt the USMC lagged one step behind.

Back to the Army, here's pop 1952.

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Monday, July 27, 2020 7:50 PM

During KW, 1950-53, the leather was generally no longer a red russet leather, but was a dark stained brown.  This spanned a lot of leather items, boots, holsters, bino cases and the like.

Now, from fickle memory, Army adopted black low quarters with the "pickle suit."  But the field gear stayed brown until during VN.  Which then started in a bunch of over-dying of existing leather, with mixed results.

SF & Ranger units started using black boots in the 60s, which may have started a trend.

The Sea Services had been using black for some times (other than avaiation personnel).

It can all be a muddle.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, July 27, 2020 7:16 PM

Thanks Mike! I’m happy to hear that you like what you see.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Tumwater, WA.
Posted by M. Brindos on Monday, July 27, 2020 2:36 PM

It's been a while since I've poked around on this forum and I'm not dissapointed, Carlos.

Fantastic work thus far! Bring on the dirt!

- Mike Brindos

Figure Painting Moderator -- Genessis-Models

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, July 27, 2020 11:30 AM

Thank you Gino. The figure is by DEF resins. I picked it up from Sprue Brothers. You are so right about trying to find tank crew figures from that era.... extremely hard to find. It’s all WWII or late Cold War thru current for US tankers. I never even thought of a head swap, and yes if this guy is posed in a hatch, depending upon which type of helmet is on the head, he’d be great for up to the 80s.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Valrico, FL
Posted by HeavyArty on Monday, July 27, 2020 10:32 AM

Both the tank and the TC look awesome. 

I may have missed it, but where did you get the TC figure from?  He looks great.  As you know, it is hard to find figures from that period, esp. in cold weather gear.  With a head change, he could work for most of the Cold War (up through the late '70s - early '80s) as well.

Gino P. Quintiliani - Field Artillery - The KING of BATTLE!!!

Check out my Gallery: http://smg.photobuck...v231/HeavyArty/?

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." -- George Orwell

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Monday, July 27, 2020 10:21 AM

Carlos & Harold

I stand corrected, sirs! Thanks for the link. It's very helpful.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, July 26, 2020 10:42 PM

Yup, the boots were brown in Korea

 

 

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2018
  • From: Vancouver, Washington USA
Posted by Sergeant on Sunday, July 26, 2020 10:08 PM

stikpusher

Here is a rundown on US Army uniform transition during the 50s

 

https://olive-drab.com/od_soldiers_clothing_1950s.php

 

Carlos, unless I missed something in your article the U.S. Army combat boot changed color from brown to black in 1958. That would be five years after the Korean War.

Harold

At the beginning of the 1950s, the World War II double-buckle boot, revised in 1947, was still issued for field and work duty. By 1953, the Boots, Service, Combat, Russet M1948 (introduced in 1948) replaced the WW II boot. The new combat boot was 10 1/2 inches high with rubber sole, polished grain leather and cap toes. In 1958, the boot color was changed to black and remaining stocks of russet boots were dyed to match.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, July 26, 2020 8:40 PM

Here is a rundown on US Army uniform transition during the 50s

 

https://olive-drab.com/od_soldiers_clothing_1950s.php

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

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