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Revell Northsea Fishing Trawler WIP

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  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Tuesday, November 22, 2022 5:09 PM

Dodgy
(Pussers. Australian and British term for the RN and the RAN. Derives from the family name of a ship's Chandler's who supplied the RN in Nelson's day. Same principle as GI. Government Issue, Pussers Issue).

Which has always been a bit of epynomous back-and-forth in maritime history.

In English, the senior member of the Service staff serving passengers has the title "Purser."

This is true for modern ships, and even airliners, where the flight attendants will have a supervisor titled Purser.  In many ocean liners, the Purser wears four stripes, and is considered as senior as the ship's Captain.  If not being in the command structure of operating the ship.

The person ranking just below the Purser is the Steward.

Etymology tells us "purser" comes from "the person carrying the Ship's Purse."  In Naval lingo, that would be a Disbursing Officer.

With a nudge from the anglo-french burser, which gives us Bursar in English.  (The latter is the formal title for a Treasurer at academic institutions.)

So then we have Mr Pusser, who sold rhum by the cask to the Royal Navy, dating back to the 1650s.  The casks had the Pusser's name branded into their heads.  And were acquired by the Ship's Purser.  Wh might be a Bursar in some navies.  For illiterate or semi-literate, sailors speaking Nautial English as a 3rd or 4th tongue, conflating Pusser with Purser is/was virtually inevitable.

  • Member since
    August 2013
  • From: Michigan
Posted by Straycat1911 on Wednesday, November 23, 2022 9:17 PM

Bakster
 

Don’t look to this build as being an expert boat builder showing his skils. I am not an accomplished boat builder and I know even less about boats. You can consider me a green horn or a landlubber. With that said, I love boats, and we must all start somewhere. This build is ripe for many mundane questions which many of you are in the know.
 
The release of this kit goes back many years and many of you may have built this at one time or another. So, feel free to offer up tips, thoughts, history, whatever. Consider it an open thread to educate me, but not only me, many others that might be in the same “boat." It will be a great opportunity for teaching and learning.
 
Looking at the kit I see some things I don’t like, but—for $15 and change and several months fun—I will do what I can to overcome them. And just maybe—with your help—turn out a decent build and in the process learn a heap more about boats.
 
Leaving my options open I may add a seascape to the equation. I am pushing the envelope of my skills with a seascape; anything can happen. Could be a sinking-- or a victory.
 
Lasty--I think this thread has the “potential” for one heck of a seafaring ride.
 
More to come.
 

I've got this one started; I'm doing it as a "what if" Great Lakes tour boat. 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, November 23, 2022 11:06 PM

Straycat1911

 

 
Bakster
 

Don’t look to this build as being an expert boat builder showing his skils. I am not an accomplished boat builder and I know even less about boats. You can consider me a green horn or a landlubber. With that said, I love boats, and we must all start somewhere. This build is ripe for many mundane questions which many of you are in the know.
 
The release of this kit goes back many years and many of you may have built this at one time or another. So, feel free to offer up tips, thoughts, history, whatever. Consider it an open thread to educate me, but not only me, many others that might be in the same “boat." It will be a great opportunity for teaching and learning.
 
Looking at the kit I see some things I don’t like, but—for $15 and change and several months fun—I will do what I can to overcome them. And just maybe—with your help—turn out a decent build and in the process learn a heap more about boats.
 
Leaving my options open I may add a seascape to the equation. I am pushing the envelope of my skills with a seascape; anything can happen. Could be a sinking-- or a victory.
 
Lasty--I think this thread has the “potential” for one heck of a seafaring ride.
 
More to come.
 

 

 

I've got this one started; I'm doing it as a "what if" Great Lakes tour boat. 

 

Sounds cool!

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, November 25, 2022 1:49 PM

Not much to see here but it's an update. Indifferent

Notice the mount from the mast to the spar. 

I tried to duplicate it.

And mounted.

Next to work on are the ladder rungs.

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, November 25, 2022 4:58 PM

I like your what if idea about the Great lakes touring boat. 

Nice work on the mass* standoff and the long skinny thing that holds those lines. As should be intuitively obvious, I am also not a boat expert. Pirate

Edit:

*Mast. Some one-liners about a mass standoff come to mind, though.

-Greg

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, November 25, 2022 6:55 PM

Hey Greg, thanks Friend-o.

Nautical verbiage has been a topic of discussion.  For us landlubbers, long skinny thing must do.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, November 26, 2022 10:54 AM

Bakster

Not much to see here but it's an update. Indifferent

Notice the mount from the mast to the spar. 

Excellent view of the mast head lights, too.

Note that the "spar" is nothing but a spreader bar for the long-base radio antenna.

The halyard and sail head show that this vessel is a "dragger."  Fishing regulations vary nation-by-nation, and the conservation rules especially so.  So, some bottom fishing, where a trawl is drug across the bottom, is only permitted if not under power.  So, even modern vessels might be fitted with sails, so as to drift down wind.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, November 26, 2022 12:45 PM

CapnMac82

 

 
Bakster

Not much to see here but it's an update. Indifferent

Notice the mount from the mast to the spar. 

 

 

Excellent view of the mast head lights, too.

Note that the "spar" is nothing but a spreader bar for the long-base radio antenna.

The halyard and sail head show that this vessel is a "dragger."  Fishing regulations vary nation-by-nation, and the conservation rules especially so.  So, some bottom fishing, where a trawl is drug across the bottom, is only permitted if not under power.  So, even modern vessels might be fitted with sails, so as to drift down wind.

 

Excellent educating points, Capn! I would not have known that. Thanks for advising!

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, November 26, 2022 12:57 PM

Speaking of Friendo...

This guy made the movie worth watching.

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, November 26, 2022 1:11 PM

Or, the remaining skipjacks used for oyster dredging use a little push boat two days a week IIRC.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, November 26, 2022 6:29 PM

GMorrison

Or, the remaining skipjacks used for oyster dredging use a little push boat two days a week IIRC.

 

Bill

 

Ah... interesting. Yes

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, November 27, 2022 8:36 AM

Capn or other. 

So... being a dragger, edumecate me. What sort of aquatic are they fishing for? Also, you mentioned the net is drug along the bottom. Is that literally pulled along the seafloor? You'd think it'd snag on something. 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, November 27, 2022 12:56 PM

Well... the model threw me another curve ball. All the while I was making rungs I was thinking-- something is not right. I stopped to check the pitch several times and it checked out. The number of rungs between the rail anchors look good-- keep going Steve.

About halfway down the mast I thought --dang it-- something is off! There are far too many rungs!

I found a 1:1 image. Looking at it closely I counted roughly a total of seven anchors.

Look at the mast from the model. They have double that! 

That was the problem. I used those anchors as a gauge to pitch the rungs. I was building twice the number I should be. Who designed this model, Mickey Mouse? Lol.

Three hours into it I start ripping it apart. At this point, I had to repair some glue damage, then start over.

Below: I removed the extra anchors. I still don't think it is entirely right because the spacing changes towards the bottom of the mast. I was not about to fix that too; close enough.

I used .020 round stock for the side rails and .010 flat stock mounted on end for the rungs.

What do you know... the mast is done.

I will probably work on the fiber optic next.

End of update.

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, November 27, 2022 1:00 PM

Bakster
Also, you mentioned the net is drug along the bottom. Is that literally pulled along the seafloor? You'd think it'd snag on something. 

Largely, you frag for bivalves--oysters, scallops, and the like.

The net has a toothed frame designed to "chatter" on the bottom.  And, it's a small affair, perhaps a meter wide.

The draggers also "know their bottom," they don't drag where they get snags or the like.  (This is also a benefit of being under sail--no ripping the winches out or the like.)

Shrimp trawlers have their nets just above the bottom.  In days of old, there was a "necklace" with dangling chains ahead o the net, to "spook" the shrimp up off the bottom.  This is not allowed in modern fisheries.

The skipjacks Bill notes use a pushboat to get to the fishing ground, but are olny allowed to "dredge" under sail-this is to protect the oyster beds. The pushboats don't have rudders, as they are lashed to the sides/sterns o the skipjacks.

A limited number of powerboats are allowed out on the oysterbeds, but, they are restricted to "tong-ing" for their catch.  The tongs are set up like a pair of 1m wide rakes with 3m hafts, pivoted like scissors.  You want to be a stout fellow to work the tongs and raise enough fresh oysters to make a living of it.

The North Sea trawlers, like the Tigers, made their living in the mid-depths, going after specific speies of fish--like herring or hake or the like.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, November 27, 2022 1:06 PM

The tongers have their own grounds where dredgers cant go.

Any fishing ground, and I've been on a few; can get very contentious and sometimes a little violent.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Sunday, November 27, 2022 3:02 PM

Hi Bill!

     You are so right! Even in the Deepwater Tuna Fleets each Fleet had it's ground, Don't trespass or you might get rammed or worse. Uncle Joe stayed out of that stuff.

 Like he said."Theysa stupido, Cotcha da fich, notta the punch onna de jaw!"

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, November 27, 2022 3:11 PM

"No Italian on the radio!".

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, November 27, 2022 4:19 PM

CapnMac82

 

 
Bakster
Also, you mentioned the net is drug along the bottom. Is that literally pulled along the seafloor? You'd think it'd snag on something. 

 

Largely, you frag for bivalves--oysters, scallops, and the like.

The net has a toothed frame designed to "chatter" on the bottom.  And, it's a small affair, perhaps a meter wide.

The draggers also "know their bottom," they don't drag where they get snags or the like.  (This is also a benefit of being under sail--no ripping the winches out or the like.)

Shrimp trawlers have their nets just above the bottom.  In days of old, there was a "necklace" with dangling chains ahead o the net, to "spook" the shrimp up off the bottom.  This is not allowed in modern fisheries.

The skipjacks Bill notes use a pushboat to get to the fishing ground, but are olny allowed to "dredge" under sail-this is to protect the oyster beds. The pushboats don't have rudders, as they are lashed to the sides/sterns o the skipjacks.

A limited number of powerboats are allowed out on the oysterbeds, but, they are restricted to "tong-ing" for their catch.  The tongs are set up like a pair of 1m wide rakes with 3m hafts, pivoted like scissors.  You want to be a stout fellow to work the tongs and raise enough fresh oysters to make a living of it.

The North Sea trawlers, like the Tigers, made their living in the mid-depths, going after specific speies of fish--like herring or hake or the like.

 

Hey Capn, that was extremely interesting to me. I always wondered how they did that, and now I have a better idea. Thanks for the info!

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, November 27, 2022 4:23 PM

GMorrison

The tongers have their own grounds where dredgers cant go.

Any fishing ground, and I've been on a few; can get very contentious and sometimes a little violent.

 

Bill

 

I can imagine it like in the series, Bering Sea Gold. They often had situations when miners  encroach on other miners claims. Money is money and you better stay out of my sandbox.

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 3:07 AM

Here in Lakes we have scallop boats, seiners, board trawlers and shark boats.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 8:23 AM

Ah, But Bill:

       That was said in the wheelhouse to me, Not on the Radio. We'sa spika da Yinglich inna da radio Tingy!

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 3:02 PM

I started on the fiber optics. The first thing I did was make the light engine housings and a pedestal. The fiber optic strands are stiff and the less stress on them the better. So, the pedestal is to help make them level with the porthole. 

You can see below the first half is fitted and here I am testing the light output. It works like a charm. I then proceeded to polish the ends and epoxy the strands in place. For the other half, I will duplicate the process going the other direction and using the other housing. And for the two larger portholes at the front of the cabin, I will have a separate light engine and I hope to light them both using one housing. Btw. I figured it pretty good when I said I should be able to fit 4 strands per housing. I can barely get the fourth in it. It is nice and snug.

My next update should hopefully show the entire assembly complete.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 5:08 PM

Well, ok then, Kalmbach is not letting me quote the post.

Note at the front of the house there are a couple of spotlights, which are mounted up under the overhang of the wheelhouse, above.  These are about 8-10" around, and show up in several photos. Those lights illuminate the well deck working area, and would be "on" during ordinary steaming.

This would seem to be the opportune time to install those, if not to affix them, per se.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 9:10 PM

CapnMac82

Well, ok then, Kalmbach is not letting me quote the post.

Note at the front of the house there are a couple of spotlights, which are mounted up under the overhang of the wheelhouse, above.  These are about 8-10" around, and show up in several photos. Those lights illuminate the well deck working area, and would be "on" during ordinary steaming.

This would seem to be the opportune time to install those, if not to affix them, per se.

 

It's good you mentioned it now because I am nearing that point of attaching the assembly. Then it's too late.

Are these the lights you are talking about under the wheelhouse? It looks easy enough to do.

I have been using white LEDs for the exterior lighting and maybe I should have used yellow. Not that I care that much. I will probably just keep it consistent and do the same on these.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, November 30, 2022 12:55 PM

"Found this small motor (which likely needs a potentiometer to reduce rpm) that might be less work than a vibrator motor.

https://nfpshop.com/product/4mm-smallest-dc-motor-12mm-length-3-7v-dc-model-nfp-d0412-3978"


Hey Capn, I wote these guys and they confirmed what you said about reversing the polarity to change the direction of rotation. For grins, I will order a few to experiment with. With luck, maybe get it encorporated into the build.

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, December 1, 2022 3:11 PM

Bakster
Are these the lights you are talking about under the wheelhouse? It looks easy enough to do.

Cool, Qoute Function works today.

Yes, those are the very ones.

I'll wager they appear yellow from being incandescent lamps (although there is a possibility they are low-pressure sodium High Intensity lamps--which have an ocher sort of amber light).

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, December 1, 2022 3:20 PM

Bakster
Hey Capn, I wote these guys and they confirmed what you said about reversing the polarity to change the direction of rotation.

That's the way most DC motors work.  So, it seemed a safe assertion to make.

Al manner of cool things around, really.  Did you see Thomas over at LaserCreationWorld used a magnet to levitate an "anti-gravity car" in a recent video?

So many options out there.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, December 1, 2022 8:15 PM

CapnMac82

 

 
Bakster
Hey Capn, I wote these guys and they confirmed what you said about reversing the polarity to change the direction of rotation.
 

 

That's the way most DC motors work.  So, it seemed a safe assertion to make.

Al manner of cool things around, really.  Did you see Thomas over at LaserCreationWorld used a magnet to levitate an "anti-gravity car" in a recent video?

So many options out there.

 

I got as far to finalize the order when the cost of shipping came up. It was $30 to ship a few tiny $3 motors. Apparently, they only ship DHL air and these come from China. So... for something that may or may not work for me it would cost over $40. I backed out of the order... we can use our imagination on this one. 

No I hadn't seen that one about the levitating car. It sounds cool and I will look into it.

Thanks, Capn!

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, December 1, 2022 9:18 PM

CapnMac82

 

 
Bakster
Are these the lights you are talking about under the wheelhouse? It looks easy enough to do.

 

Cool, Qoute Function works today.

Yes, those are the very ones.

I'll wager they appear yellow from being incandescent lamps (although there is a possibility they are low-pressure sodium High Intensity lamps--which have an ocher sort of amber light).

 

 

Sounds good... I will fabricate them. I made the mast and stern light a pure white. Are those colors technically correct? I have no idea.

I just searched fishing boats imaged at night and it looks like the various light sources can be mash of different colors from pure white, to yellow, to an almost green. Some of that probably altered by the camera, and some from what the various light sources are made from. The point though, they appear different.

At first I was leaning towards making them white and in keeping with the other exterior lighting but... as per the above, yellow might make it more visually interesting to say the least, and possibly more accurate when we consider the Ross Tiger photo I posted earlier.

Anyway, that is how I am leaning. Your thoughts are always welcome.

 

  • Member since
    July 2015
Posted by MR TOM SCHRY on Friday, December 2, 2022 8:03 AM

Bakster,

I've been following along with this build and the work that you're doing to this "vintage" kit is amazing.  I have the same kit so I'm taking a ton of notes.  When this model is completed have you considered entering it in the annual Manitowoc Ship Model Contest or perhaps the 2024 IPMS Nationals which are being held in Madison, WI?  Something of this quality needs to be seen by a lot more people.

tjs

TJS

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